Manor of Rensselaerwyck

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Albany and Rensselaer Anti-Rent Associations, 1846 - 34 sider
 

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Side 30 - That all such parts of the said common law, and all such of the said statutes and acts aforesaid, or parts thereof, as may be construed to establish or maintain any particular denomination of Christians or their ministers...
Side 21 - Base services were such as were fit only for peasants, or persons of a servile rank ; as to plough the lord's land, to make his hedges, to carry out his dung, or other mean employments.
Side 21 - TTie certain services, whether free or base, were such as were stinted in quantity, and could not be exceeded on any pretence ; as, to pay a stated annual rent, or to plough such a field for three days. The uncertain...
Side 30 - For the purpose of constituting an adverse possession, by any person claiming a title founded upon a written instrument, or a judgment or decree, land shall be deemed to have been possessed and occupied in the following cases: 1. Where it has been usually cultivated or improved: 2.
Side 30 - ... common law, and all such of the said statutes and acts aforesaid, or parts thereof, as may be construed to establish or maintain any particular denomination of Christians or their ministers, or concern the allegiance heretofore yielded to, and the supremacy, sovereignty, government or prerogatives, claimed or exercised by the king of Great Britain and his predecessors over the colony of New York and its inhabitants, or are repugnant to this constitution, be and they hereby are, abrogated and...
Side 22 - ... baron, or hath been at any time in the hands of the crown. In imitation whereof these inferior lords began to carve out and grant to others still more minute estates, to be held as of themselves, and were so proceeding downwards...
Side 23 - ... and also that the mesne lords themselves were so impoverished thereby, that they were disabled from performing their services to their own superiors.
Side 24 - And that all fines for alienations, tenures by homage, knight-service, and escuage, and also aids for marrying the daughter or knighting the son, and all tenures of the king in capite, be likewise taken away.
Side 30 - ... the statute law of England and Great Britain, and of the acts of the legislature of the colony of New York, as together did form the law of the said colony on the...
Side 23 - Almost all the real property of this kingdom is, by the policy of our laws, supposed to be granted by, dependent upon, and holden of, some superior...

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