Putnam's Magazine: Original Papers on Literature, Science, Art, and National Interests, Volum 10

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G. P. Putnam & Son., 1868
 

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Side 239 - IT is not growing like a tree In bulk, doth make Man better be; Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere: A lily of a day Is fairer far in May, Although it fall and die that night; It was the plant and flower of light. In small proportions we just beauties see; And in short measures, life may perfect be.
Side 101 - And that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us, and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people on whom he also obtruded them ; thus paying off former crimes committed against the LIBERTIES of one people with crimes which he urges them to commit against the LIVES of another.
Side 104 - I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise THEIR CONTROL WITH A WHOLESOME DISCRETION, THE REMEDY IS NOT TO TAKE IT FROM THEM, BUT TO INFORM THEIR DISCRETION BY EDUCATION.
Side 101 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.
Side 102 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Side 396 - Oh that I had in the wilderness a lodging place of wayfaring men; That I might leave my people, and go from them ! For they be all adulterers, an assembly of treacherous men.
Side 242 - The individual who causes two blades of grass to grow where but one grew before, is held in highest emulation as a benefactor of his race.
Side 397 - Therefore not unto us, 0 Lord, not unto us ; but unto thy Name be given the glory.
Side 103 - For if a slave can have a country in this world, it must be any other in preference to that in which he is born to live and labor for another...
Side 291 - Llewellyn homeward hied ; when, near the portal seat, his truant Gelert he espied, bounding his lord to greet. But when he gained the castle door, aghast the chieftain stood ; the hound was smeared with gouts...

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