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THE

LIFE

OF

HIS GRACE

ARTHUR
DUKE, MARQUIS, AND EARL OF

WELLINGTON,

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9 VISCOUNT WELLINGTON OF TALAVERA AND OF WELLINGTON, AND BARON DOURO OF WELLESLEY, ALL IN THE COUNTY

OF SOMERSET, K. G. AND FIELD MARSHAL OF THE BRITISH FORCES; MARSHAL-GENERAL OF THE PORTUGUESE, AND CAPTAIN-GENERAL OF THE SPANISH ARMIES; Commander-in-Chief of bis Britannic Majesty's Forces serving in the Peninsula ; also Grandee of the First Class in Spain, Duke of Ciudad Rodrigo, and Knight of the Golden Fleece, &c. &c. &c.

AND IN PORTUGAL DUKE OF VITTORIA, MARQUIS OF TORRES VEDRAS, Conde De Vimiera, Knight.Grand Cross of the Royal Military Order of the

Tower and Sword, &c. &c. &c.

WITH

COPIOUS DETAILS AND DELINEATIONS

HISTORICAL,
Political, and Military,

OF THE VARIOUS

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IMPORTANT SERVICES

In which he has been engaged in
FLANDERS, IRELAND,

SPAIN,
INDIA,

DENMARK, PORTUGAL
AND FRANCE.

TOO ETHER WITH
CIVIL AND POLITICAL ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE SPANISH AFFAIRS,
AND OF THE OCCURRENCES IN DIFFERENT QUARTERS

OF THE PENINSULA;

AND OF THE RECENT EVENTS IN FRANCE: Thus crowning the Everlasting Monumental Pillar of British National Glory.

Including Numerous Interesting

Professional Anecdotes,

NOT ONLY OF HIS BRETHREN IN ARMS, BUT ALSO OF THE GREAT GENE

RALS OPPOSED TO HIM IN VARIOUS PARTS OF THE WORLD.

FORMING
Ą Complete and General View of his Services,
AND OF THEIR BENEFICIAL CONSEQUENCES AS TO THE POLITICAL
SITUATION, AND HONOURABLE CHARACTER,

OF THE BRITISH NATION.

BY FRANCIS L. CLARKE.

ILLUSTRATED BY ENGRAVINGS.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

LONDON:
PRINTED BY AND FOR J. AND J. CUNDRE,

IVY-LANS, PATERNOSTER-ROW.

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THERE never was a question in politics, perhaps, in which there has been a greater, a more extreme, difference, than on that of the war in the Peninsula ; and it is not less worthy of notice, that, perhaps, there never was a greater degree of unanimity of approval than at present upon this very question.

When all Spain rose, as it were by a miracle, (for the effect was simultaneous and without combination) in opposition to the insidious thraldom of France, her exertions were looked on by many in this country with coolness, and even apathy. It was supposed im possible for a degraded, and almost enslaved popula tion to resist, even for a moment, the military powe and political machinations of him who had conquere more than half of the civilized world. All feare

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her eventual success, and some prognosticated, with the most determined assertions, her eternal subjugation, Yet, in the space of a few short years, how changed is the scene !~so changed, that even our most desponding statesmen venture to look forward to her restoration to her ancient rank among the kingdoms of Europe, and to her resuming that rank accompanied with feelings of esteem and gratitude to Britain ; feelings which, in future political connections, may ultimately tend highly both to the political welfare and internal comfort of each country. To what, then, has this wonderful, this extraordinary, change been owing ? To what, indeed, but to the liberal and friendly assistance of this country ;-to the gallantry of our troops, and to the consummate skill and approved valour of him who has so frequently led them on to glory! During the whole progress of this arduous, this almost unequalled contest, the gallant Wellington has unequivocally afforded grounds for the highest honours that his Sovereign could shower down upon him, or his grateful country could beston. He has, by his example, given spirit and enthusiasm, not only to his own troops, but to those of the sister kingdoms of the Peninsula. By his cousummate skill, indefatigable exertions, and excellent judgment, he has foiled the best Generals of France, overcome difficulties considered insuperable, and directed the excertions of Britain, and the force of her unfortunate allies, to those points where, in all cases, they were most available.

By his steadiness, and his Fabius movements, he has preserved his own strength unbroken, whilst that

of

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