The Louisiana Purchase and Our Title West of the Rocky Mountains: With a Review of Annexation by the United States

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1900 - 87 sider
 

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Side 23 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations who in conjunction can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the Uritish fleet and nation. * * * This is not a state
Side 28 - or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States." And whereas, in pursuance of the treaty, and particularly of the third article, the French Republic has an
Side 39 - Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States
Side 47 - as follows: Commencing from the southernmost point of the island called Prince of Wales Island, which point lies in the parallel of 54° 40' north latitude, and between the one hundred and thirty-first and one hundred and thirty-third degree of west longitude (meridian of Greenwich), the said line shall ascend to the north along the channel called
Side 47 - as far as the point of intersection of the one hundred and forty-first degree of west longitude (of the same meridian); and finally, from the said point of intersection, the said meridian line of the one hundred and fortyfirst degree in its prolongation as far as the
Side 28 - an. 9 (ist October, 1800,) between the First Consul of the French Republic and his catholic majesty, it was agreed as follows: " His catholic majesty promises and engages on his part, to cede to the French Republic, six mouths after the full and entire execution of the conditions and stipulations
Side 24 - opposing it. To the first one Napoleon communicated his final resolution, saying: It is not only New Orleans that I will cede, it is the whole colony without any reservation. * * * To attempt to retain it would be folly. I direct you to negotiate this offer with the envoys of the United States. * * * I will
Side 24 - one town in Louisiana, but I already consider the colony as entirely lost; and it appears to me that in the hands of this growing power it will be more useful to the policy, and even to the commerce, of France, than if I should attempt to keep it.
Side 13 - line drawn along the middle of the river Mississippi, from its source to the river Iberville, and from thence by a line drawn along the middle of this river, and the lakes Maurepasand
Side 28 - after the full and entire execution of the conditions and stipulations herein relative to his royal highness, the Duke of Parma, the colon}- or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain,

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