The Theory and Practice of Banking, Volum 2

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Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1886
 

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Report of the Committee
18
The Committee report that the Directors should regulate their issues by the price of guineas and the foreign Ex changes
19
The Committee do not discuss tho new theory of paper currency
20
First declaration by a Parliamentary Committee that the paper currency should be regulated by the Foreign Ex changes
21
Renewal of the Banks loan to Government
22
Perfidious conduct of Prussia in 1805
23
The Berlin decree against British commerce in 1807
24
Immense speculation in 1808 and subsequent years
25
Great rise in the market price of gold
26
Names of the Committee
27
Remarks upon some of the evidence
28
State of facts agreed upon
29
Issues maintained by the other party
30
Discussion of the points of difference
31
Evidence of Mr Chambers
32
Bemark of Mr Huskisson 84
34
Another illustration
35
Discussion on second point of difference between the two parties
36
Opinion of a foreign merchant 87
37
Discussion of the third point of difference between the parties
38
Discussion of the fourth point of difference reserved
39
The same continued
40
The same continued
41
The same continued
42
The same continued
43
The same continued
44
The same continued
45
The same continued
46
The same continued
47
Besolutions of Mr Horner
48
Mr Roses reply to Mr Horner
49
Mr Vansittarts resolutions
50
Historical untruth of the doctrine that the coinage never was intended to contain any fixed quantity of bullion
52
Examples of this given by Mr Sharp
53
Rejection of the Bullion BeportMr Peel votes with the majority
54
Mr Canning tries to persuade Mr Vansittart to abstain from pressing his resolution
55
Letter of Lord King
56
Opposed by Lord Grenville
57
Observations of Lord Stauhope
58
Alleged injustice of making the Bank buy gold at the market price
59
Great speculations and increase of country banks in 1813
60
Great destruction of country bank paper in 1816 rise in the foreign exchanges and fall in the market price of gold
61
Which is an example of the truth of the principles of the Bullion Report
62
Partial resumption of cash payments in 1816
63
Great drain of bullion in 181819appointment of Com mittee by both Houses of Parliament to enquire into the expediency of resuming cash payments
64
Opinion of Mr Dorrein Governor of the Bank
65
Opinion of Mr Pole DeputyGovernor of the Bank
66
Opinion of Mr Haldimand Director of the Bank
67
Opinion of Mr Ward Director of the Bank
71
Opinion of Mr Samuel Thornton late Director of the Bank
72
Opinion of Mr Thomas Tooke
74
Opinion of Mr Ricardo
75
Opinion of Mr Baring
77
Opinion of Mr John Ward
79
Reports of the Committees to both Houses
80
125 Ministerial resolutions
81
Speeches of Lord Lauderdale and Lord King
83
Table shewing the chief variations in the marketprice
95
Sir Robert Peel is entitled to neither the merit nor the blame
104
Description of the speculative mania of 1825
112
Fatal conduct of the Bank of England at this period
113
Bapid efflux of Bullion from the Bank of England in 1824
114
Banking panic in the autumn and winter of 1825
115
General run upon the London and country bankers
116
The great pressure in the moneymarket turns the exchanges in favour of England
117
S3 Issue of 1 notes by the Bank which stays the panic in the country
118
The crisis an example of the truth of the principles of the Bullion Report
119
The speculative mania not attributable to the Bank or to the country banks
120
The bold policy of the Bank saved it from bankruptcy
121
Abolition of 1 and 2 bank notes
122
Mr Barings condemnation of the small notes
123
Opinion of Sir John Newport
125
Speech of Sir Robert Peel
126
Provisions of the Act suppressing small notes in England
127
Intention of the Government to suppress the small notes in Scotland abandoned in consequence of the recommenda tion of Committees of both Hous...
128
Beform Bill
129
Committee of the Commons on the Bank Charter
130
Mr Horsley Palmers description of the method adopted by the Bank to carry out the principles of the Bullion Report
131
First appearance of the heresy that bills of exchange form no part of the circulating medinm
132
Definition of the Banks exclusive privilege of banking
133
The Banks privilege held not to exclnde the formation of Joint Stock Banks of deposit
134
Provisions of the Act renewing the Bank Charter in 1833
135
Depression of the price of wheat in 18343536
136
Position of the Bank in 18333435
138
Decline of bullion in the Bank in 1836
139
Difficulties of the Agricultural and Commercial Bank in Ireland
140
Position of the Bank in March 1838
142
The Bank sends a million of sovereigns to America
143
The bank rate of discount much below the market rate
144
Appointment of the Committee on banks of issue in 1840
145
Lord Overstone points out the fundamental vice of the bank principle of 1832
147
Unsatisfactory character of the inquiry
148
State of the country from 1838 to 1844
149
FROM THE BANK ACT OF 1844 TO THE PRESENT TIME 1 Sir Robert Peels views regarding the Currency on introducing the Bank Act of 1844
150
Unfairness of his illustration
153
Continuation of Sir Robert Peels speech
155
Further proposals of Sir Robert Peel
156
Extract from Sir Charles Woods speech
157
Chief provisions of the Act
158
Tlie Act authorises a violation of its own principle
160
Incorrect to say that the Act of 1844 is the complement of the Act of 1819
161
Great error of writers who think that prices must vary exactly with the amoilnt of the Currency
162
The Bank Act shewn to be subject to the same radical vice as the bank principle of 1832
165
Passes off after the first week of May
167
Great failures in the Autumn of 1817
168
The Government letter authorising the Bank of England to issue notes beyond the limits prescribed by the Act of 1814
170
Extraordinary aid afforded by the Bank of England to Com mercial houses in the Autumn of 1847
171
Meeting of Parliament in November 1847
172
Speech of Sir Robert Peel
175
The same continued
176
Opinion of the Governor aud DeputyGovernor of the Bank of England on the Act of 1814
177
Mr Guineys opinion
178
Mr Loyds opinion
179
Mr Glyns opinion
180
Comparative view of the bullion and the rate of discount of the Bank of England during 1855
182
Jndicious conduct of the Bank during this drain
183
Pressure in 1856
184
Improved management of the Bank
185
Commencement of the crisis of 1857
186
Increase of the panic
187
Evidence of the Governor
188
Notes issued in excess of the Act
190
Pressure in 1863 and 1864
191
Bank of England joins the Clearing House
192
Third Suspension of the Bank Charter Act
195
Act to forbid the optional clauses
208
Extract from Adam Smith
209
The Ayr Bank
213
The Bank of Scotland increases its Capital
216
The Scotch Banks suspend payments in cash in 1797
217
The Commercial Bank founded in 1810
218
Committees of Parliament on Scotch Banks 219
219
Scotch Banking Act of 1845
220
Failure of the Western Bank in 1857
221
Details of this failure
233
The circumstances of this failure prove the solidity of the Scotch Banking system
234
On the Right of the Scotch Banks to open Branches in England
237
Stoppage of the City of Glasgow Bank
241
ON SOME THEORIES OF CURRENCY 1 It is necessary not only to ascertain the true principles of monetary science but to point out the fallacy of f...
243
Peculiarity of Laws system
244
It is a violation of the fundamental conception of a Currency established in this work
245
Some account of Laws Theory of Money
246
The same continued
247
The same continued
248
The same continued
249
The same continued
250
The essence of Lawism is that money represents commodities and that paper currency may be based upon commodities Bloney does not represent Co...
251
The Theory of basing a paper currency upon commodities involves the palpable contradiction in terms that a person may buy commodities and keep...
252
Laws idea
253
The most celebrated examples of Lawism
254
Accounts of the French Assignata
255
The same continued
256
The same continued
257
The same continued
258
His extraordinary inconsistency
260
The same continued
262
Practical results of Laws Theory
263
Fifth exampleThe American banking convulsions of 183739
264
The principle of basing a paper currency on the public funds is identical with and is as vicious as basing it on land
266
Fundamental vice of the constitution of the Bank of England
267
The consequences of this vicious principle are prevented by its being limited to that single instance
268
This refutation incomplete
271
The same continued
273
Specific meaning of overissue
274
Fallacy of the expression good bills
275
Bullion is only the regulator of its amount
276
Specie and credit must always increase and decrease to gether
277
The rate of discount is the true mode of acting upon the paper currency
278
Effects of the action of this principle
279
In all commercial crises production should be curbed
280
The same continued
281
Historical proof of the fallacy of this theory
282
Consequences of adopting Sir A Alisons plan
283
S Still in spirit the Common Law of England
291
All Negotiable Instruments are Currency
304
Writers who include Bank Credits as Currency
312
Discussion between Mr Hume and Lord Overstone
320
Legal and philosophical errors of these opinions
326
Opinion of M Michel Chevalier
333
An example of Lawism
336
On the causes which compelled the Suspension of the Bank
348
When the Foreign Exchanges are adverse the Bank must contract its issues 283
350
tive Theory
354
The Rate of Discount is the true Supreme Power
365
Mr Lowe on Commercial Panics
368
The Bank Act has rendered all banking illegal
371
The Cheque Bank
374
Illegality of this Bank
375
An Inquiry into the Banking System of the country will become necessary
378
CHAPTER XVII
379
Statute of 1826 permitting Joint Stock Banks of Issue 65
382
Slow progress in forming Joint Stock Banks
383
Regulations of Bank Charter Act 1833
384
Joint Stock Banks founded in London
385
Contest of Joint Stock Banks with the Bank
386
Statute of 1838 c 96
387
Committees of House of Commons on Joint Stock Banks
388
Limited liability conceded to Banks
389
Causes of the failure of Joint Stock Banking in England
390
VOL II
391
Consequences of this monopoly 339
394
Modern commercial ideas
395
Decay of private Banking
396
Statutes of 1858 and 1879 extending limited liability to Banks
400
CHAPTER XVIII
402
Trading customers
405
Nature of Banking
408
Relation of Banker to customer as Pawnee of banking securities
410
On Short Bills
412
Belation of Banker to customer as Warehouseman of his plate jewels specie deeds securities itc
413
Bankers as Agents or Correspondents of other bankers
415
On Banking Investments
419
On discounting Bills of Exchange
420
Advances on loan with security
424
Advances by way of Cash Credits and Overdrawn Accounts
427
Bill brokers
429
On the Clearing System
435
On the Edinburgh Clearing House
437
On the London Clearing House
443
CHAPTER XIX
448
Gray
450
On Goods taken as Security
452
Policies of Life Assurance taken as Securities
453
On Title Deeds taken as Security
455
On Securities by third persons
459
Puller 412
460
Loyd 513
461
On Dock Warrants and Bills of Lading
462
The Factors Act
463
Factors Acts limited to mercantile transactions
469
Factors Acts Amendment Act 1877
472
On Bills of Lading
474
Bills of Lading Amendment Act 1855
476
CHAPTER XX
478
Definitions and General Principles
480
On the Transfer of a Credit or Debt
481
Jones
484
Witt
492
Vaughan 572
495
Sweetapple 505
505
Hale 460
511
Crossed Cheques
520
Allport
529
Lloyd i 221 ii 481
544
Harrison
548
Macdermot
561
Richardson
563
Maffey
576
Measure of Damages of a Dishonoured Bill
579
Bruce 490
593

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Side 566 - Where the instrument contains or a person adds to his signature words indicating that he signs for or on behalf of a principal, or in a representative capacity, he is not liable on the instrument if he was duly authorized; but the mere addition of words describing him as an agent, or as filling a representative character, without disclosing his principal, does not exempt him from personal liability.
Side 578 - Partial, that is to say, an acceptance to pay part only of the amount for which the bill is drawn ; 3.
Side 572 - In the hands of any holder other than a holder in due course, a negotiable instrument is subject to the same defenses as if it were non-negotiable. But a holder who derives his title through a holder in due course, and who is not himself a party to any fraud or illegality affecting the instrument, has all the rights of such former holder in respect of all parties prior to the latter.
Side 556 - Where a banker in good faith and without negligence receives payment for a customer of a cheque crossed generally or specially to himself, and the customer has no title, or a defective title, thereto, the banker shall not incur any liability to the true owner of the cheque by reason only of having received such payment.
Side 418 - ... any body politic or corporate whatsoever created or to be created, or for any other persons whatsoever united or to be united in covenants or partnership exceeding the number of six persons in that part of Great Britain called England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money on their bills or notes payable on demand or at any less time than six months from the borrowing thereof...
Side 566 - But if any such instrument, after completion, is negotiated to a holder in due course, it is valid and effectual for all purposes in his hands, and he may enforce it as if it had been filled up strictly in accordance with the authority given and within a reasonable time.
Side 515 - Act had not passed), to pass and transfer the legal right to such debt or chose in action from the date of such notice, and all legal and other remedies for the same, and the power to give a good discharge for the same, without the concurrence of the assignor...

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