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DISPATCHES AND LETTERS

OP

VICE ADMIRAL

LORD VISCOUNT NELSON;

WITH NOTES BY

SIR NICHOLAS HARRIS NICOLAS, G.C.M.G.

“ The Nation expected, and was entitled to expect, that while Cities vied with each other
in consecrating Statues in marble and brass to the memory of our Nelson, a Literary
Monument would be erected, which should record his deeds for the immortal honour of his
own Country, and the admiration of the rest of the World."-QUARTERLY REVIEW.

THE SEVENTH VOLUME.

AUGUST TO OCTOBER 1805.

LONDON:
HENRY COLBURN, PUBLISHER,

GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

MDCCCXLVI.

22,4..164

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PREFACE.

In this Volume the Collection of LORD NELSON'S Letters is completed, and such a variety of matter has been inserted, that it is the more necessary to give a particular account of the contents.

The Letters extend from the 1st of August 1805, (when LORD NELSON was on his way to Ushant, after his return from the West Indies in pursuit of the French Fleet) until the 21st of October, the day of his glorious death. On the 15th of August he joined the Channel Fleet under Admiral Cornwallis, with whom he left all his own Squadron except the Victory and Superb, and proceeded with these Ships to England. He arrived at Spithead on the 18th of August; the next day he struck his Flag, and then went to Merton.

The most remarkable of his Letters about this time is the one to Captain Fremantle, wherein he speaks, in a truly modest and generous manner, of Sir Robert Calder's Action. " Who,” he asks, “ can command all the success which our Country may wish? We have fought together, and therefore well know what it is. I have had the best disposed Fleet of friends, but who can say what will be the event of a Battle? and it most sincerely grieves me that in

LONDON:

HARRISON AND CO., PRINTERS,

ST. MARTIN'S LANE.

PREFACE.

In this Volume the Collection of LORD NELSON'S Letters is completed, and such a variety of matter has been inserted, that it is the more necessary to give a particular account of the contents.

The Letters extend from the 1st of August 1805, (when LORD. NELSON was on his way to Ushant, after his return from the West Indies in pursuit of the French Fleet) until the 21st of October, the day of his glorious death. On the 15th of August he joined the Channel Fleet under Admiral Cornwallis, with whom he left all his own Squadron except the Victory and Superb, and proceeded with these Ships to England. He arrived at Spithead on the 18th of August; the next day he struck his Flag, and then went to Merton:

The most remarkable of his Letters about this time is the one to Captain Fremantle, wherein he speaks, in a truly modest and generous manner, of Sir Robert Calder's Action. " Who,” he asks, “can command all the success which our Country may wish? We have fought together, and therefore well know what it is. I have had the best disposed Fleet of friends, but who can say what will be the event of a Battle? and it most sincerely grieves me that in

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