Party and Patriotism: Or, The Degeneracy of Politics

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Swan Sonnenschein, Le Bas & Lowrey, 1886 - 149 sider

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Side 137 - And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts : I am no orator, as Brutus is ; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man...
Side 35 - Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests ; which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates ; but parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole ; where, not local purposes, not local prejudices ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole. You choose a member indeed ; but when you have chosen him he is not a member of Bristol,...
Side 52 - The spirit of our American radicalism is destructive and aimless: it is not loving; it has no ulterior and divine ends, but is destructive only out of hatred and selfishness. On the other side, the conservative party, composed of the most moderate, able and cultivated part of the population, is timid, and merely defensive of property.
Side 19 - Party is a body of men united, for promoting by their joint endeavours the national interest, upon some particular principle in which they are all agreed.
Side 104 - It were good therefore that men in their innovations would follow the example of time itself, which indeed innovateth greatly, but quietly and by degrees scarce to be perceived...
Side 43 - ... there never was more necessity for surrounding individual independence of thought, speech, and conduct with the most powerful defences, in order to maintain that originality of mind and individuality of character which are the only source of any real progress, and of most of the qualities which make the human race much superior to any herd of animals.
Side 56 - ... although we think we govern our words, and prescribe it well, loquendum ut vulgus, sentiendum ut sapientes ; yet certain it is that words, as a Tartar's bow, do shoot back upon the understanding of the wisest, and mightily entangle and pervert the judgment.
Side 36 - ... parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole ; where not local purposes, not local prejudices, ought to guide, but the general good resulting from the general reason of the whole : — you choose a member indeed ; but when you have chosen him, he is not a member of Bristol, but he is a member of parliament.
Side 105 - It is good also not to try experiments in states, except the necessity be urgent, or the utility evident; and well to beware that it be the reformation that draweth on the change, and not the desire of change that pretendeth 4 the reformation.
Side 92 - AA death. If we take the wrong road, we shall be dashed to pieces. We do not certainly know whether there is any right one. What must we do ? ' Be strong and of a good courage.

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