The Scots Magazine, Volum 49

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Sands, Brymer, Murray and Cochran, 1787
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Side 560 - Franklin, as president of the "Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery," etc., issued the following letter: — "AN ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC. " From the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes unla-wfully held in Bondage.
Side 524 - But alas ! recollection at hand Soon hurries me back to despair. But the sea-fowl is gone to her nest, The beast is laid down in his lair, Even here is a season of rest, And I to my cabin repair. There's mercy in every place, And mercy, encouraging thought ! Gives even affliction a grace, And reconciles man to his lot.
Side 446 - As an artist he has exhibited as great a proof of mechanical genius as the world has ever produced. He has not indeed made a world ; but he has by imitation approached nearer its Maker than any man who has lived from the creation to this day.* As in philosophy and war, so in government.
Side 484 - I may as well go to the meeting too, and I went with him. There stood up a man in black, and began to talk to the people very angrily. I did not...
Side 111 - All that he had ever heard, all that he had ever read, when compared with it, dwindled into nothing, and vanished like vapour before the sun;
Side 484 - If a white man in travelling through our country, enters one of our cabins, we all treat him as I treat you; we dry him if he is wet, we warm him if he is cold, and give him meat and drink, that he may allay his thirst and hunger; and we spread soft furs for him to rest and sleep on: We demand nothing in return.
Side 292 - See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight, So abject, mean and vile, Who begs a brother of the earth To give him leave to toil ; And see his lordly fellow-worm The poor petition spurn, Unmindful though a weeping wife And helpless offspring mourn.
Side 483 - Therefore as soon as they arrive within hearing, they stop and halloo, remaining there till invited to enter. Two old men usually come out to them, and lead them in. There is in every village a vacant dwelling, called the strangers
Side 15 - The flame now rested upon a pair of ample folding doors at the end of the gallery. Sir Bertrand went up to it, and applied the key to a brazen lock — with difficulty he turned the bolt...
Side 302 - ... humbly acknowledging, that we cannot expect the blessing and goodness of Almighty God, (by whom Kings reign, and on which we entirely rely,) to make our reign happy and prosperous to ourself and our people, without a religious observance of God's Holy Laws...

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