"Fiction Distorting Fact": The Prison Life, Annotated by Jefferson Davis

Forside
Mercer University Press, 1987 - 168 sider
This new study of 'Prison life' places the work and these two years in proper perspective. Davis was imprisoned and Craven was assigned to be his physician, not much more than that should be accepted as fact. This edition reproduces Davis's annotations and comments from his personal copy, along with editorial notes and explanations. It also provides a clear, objective description of Davis's life at Fort Monroe, based on evidence and Davis's own letters from prison.
 

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Innhold

PREFACE
vii
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
ix
INTRODUCTION
xi
CHAPTER 1
1
CHAPTER 2
5
CHAPTER 3
10
CHAPTER 4
15
CHAPTER 5
20
CHAPTER 13
74
CHAPTER 14
80
CHAPTER 15
85
CHAPTER 16
90
CHAPTER 17
94
CHAPTER 18
102
CHAPTER 19
108
CHAPTER 20
114

CHAPTER 6
26
CHAPTER 7
32
CHAPTER 8
37
CHAPTER 9
43
CHAPTER 10
54
CHAPTER 11
60
CHAPTER 12
68
CHAPTER 21
119
CHAPTER 22
128
CHAPTER 23
136
APPENDIX
141
BIBLIOGRAPHY
151
INDEX
165
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Side xii - I'm not trying to be funny, smart. I just want to understand it if I can and I dont know how to say it better. Because it's something my people haven't got. Or if we have got it, it all happened long ago across the water and so now there aint anything to look at every day to remind us of it...
Side xix - The past is dead; let it bury its dead, its hopes and its aspirations. Before you lies the future, a future full of golden promise, a future of expanding national glory, before which all the world shall stand amazed. Let me beseech you to lay aside all rancor, all bitter sectional feeling, and to take your places in the ranks of those who will bring about a consummation devoutly to be wished — a reunited country.

Om forfatteren (1987)

Jefferson Davis was born in Kentucky but grew up in Mississippi. After graduating from West Point in 1828, he served at frontier military posts and in the Black Hawk War. He resigned from the military in 1835. For the next 10 years, he managed his brother's isolated plantation in Mississippi. In 1845, he entered the world of politics as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Davis's reputation as a historian rests on one work - The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1878-81), an account based in large measure on his own intimate experiences. Chosen by the provisional congress as president of the Confederate States of America in 1861, Davis faced criticism throughout his tenure. After Lee surrendered without his approval, Davis was indicted by the federal government for treason. Although he spent several years in prison, he was never brought to trial. In 1867, he was released on bond, and he retired to his estate, Beauvoir, on the Gulf of Mexico in Mississippi. There he wrote The Rise and Fall to vindicate the South in general and his presidency in particular.

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