The British Prose Writers: Junius's letters

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J. Sharpe, 1821
 

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Side 120 - Resolved, that Robert Walpole, esq. having been this session of parliament expelled the house, was, and is,- incapable of being elected a member to serve in the present parliament.
Side 133 - The use you have made of these uncommon advantages might have been more honorable to yourself, but could not be more instructive to mankind. We may trace it in the veneration of your country, the choice of your friends, and in the accomplishment of every sanguine hope which the public might have conceived from the illustrious name of Russell.
Side 186 - ... complaints of your people. It is not, however, too late to correct the error of your education. We are still inclined to make an indulgent allowance for the pernicious lessons you received in your youth, and to form the most sanguine hopes from the natural benevolence of your disposition. We are far from thinking you capable of a direct deliberate purpose to invade those original rights of your subjects on which all their civil and political liberties depend. Had it been possible for us to entertain...
Side 194 - Being who gave them the rights of humanity, whose gifts it were sacrilege to surrender, let me ask you, Sir, upon what part of your subjects would you rely for assistance ? The people of Ireland have been uniformly plundered and oppressed. In return they give you every day fresh marks of their resentment. They despise the miserable governor* you have sent them, because he is the creature of Lord Bute; nor is, it from any natural confusion in their ideas, .that they are so ready to confound the original...
Side 189 - Without entering into a minuter discussion of the merits of the peace, we may observe, in the imprudent hurry with which the first overtures from France were accepted, in the conduct of the...
Side 89 - ... had some apparent influence upon every administration; and every set of ministers preserved an appearance of duration as long as they submitted to that influence. But there were certain services to be performed for the 'Favourite's security, or to gratify his resentments, which your predecessors in office had the wisdom or the virtue not to undertake. The moment this refractory spirit was discovered, their disgrace was determined. Lord Chatham, Mr. Grenville, and Lord Rockingham, have successively...
Side 79 - ITie condition of the present times is desperate indeed ; but there is a debt due to those who come after us ; and it is the historian's office to punish, . though he cannot correct. I do not give you to posterity as a pattern to imitate, but as an example to deter...
Side 143 - It is in vain, therefore, to shift the scene ; you can no more fly from your enemies than from yourself. Persecuted abroad, you look into your own heart for consolation, and find nothing but reproaches and despair. But, my lord, you may quit the field of business, though not the field of danger ; and though you cannot be safe, you may cease to be ridiculous.
Side 122 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people; and by the advice of jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom, has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Side 185 - SIR : — It is the misfortune of your life, and originally the cause of every reproach and distress which has attended your government, that you should never have been acquainted with the language of truth, until you heard it in the complaints of your people.

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