The Grenville Papers: Being the Correspondence of Richard Grenville, Earl Temple, K.G., and the Right Hon: George Grenville, Their Friends and Contemporaries, Volum 1

Forside
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Innhold

The Duke of Bedford to Mr George Grenville November 11
55
Admiral Anson to Mr George Grenville November 4
60
Colonel Speed to Mr Richard Grenville June 29 Critical
63
Mr Pelham to Mr George Grenville April 30 Preliminaries
74
Mr Pelham to Mr George Grenville September 11 Express
79
The Duke of Newcastle to Mr GrenvilleTemple September 30
85
Viscount Cobham to Mr Grenville November 26
91
Mr Pitt to Mr Grenville November 16 Respecting the
99
Mr Potter to Mr Grenville January 11 On the nomination
102
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville July 9 Movements of
108
Mr Pitt to Earl Temple March 7 Mr Pelhams death
110
Mr Pitt to Mr Grenville March 24 Lord Bolingbrokes
117
Lady Hester Grenville to Earl Temple October Her
123
Mr Pitt to Earl Temple November 1 Lord Fane Duke
129
Earl Temple to Mr Grenville May 8 The French and
134
Mr Potter to Earl Temple October Conversation with
140
The Earl of Holdernesse to Mr Grenville November 20
148
1756
154
Mr Gilbert Elliot to Mr Grenville May 25 Debate on
159
Mr Potter to Mr Grenville June 11
166
Mr Potter to Mr Grenville September 11 Preparations
172
Lord Hillsborough to Mr Grenville October 26 Rumours
178
bringing over his Electoral Troops
183
Sir Henry Erskine to Mr Grenville April 1 Rumours of poli
189
Mr Horace Walpole to Mr Grenville May 13 Encloses
195
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville July 21 Lord Loudon sailed
201
Captain Rodney to Mr Grenville September 23 Taking of
208
Captain Rodney to Mr Grenville October 13 The most san
214
Mr Elliot to Mr Grenville October 18 Unable to comprehend
218
Mr Wilkes to Mr Grenville October 22 General discontent
224
Earl Temple to Mr Grenville November 24
230
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville April 4 French and Russian
235
Mr Pitt to Mr Grenville June 27 Prince Ferdinands vic
244
Sir Richard Lyttelton to Mr Grenville July 22 Siege
250
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville August 14 Surrender
256
Mr Pitt to Mr Grenville May 28 Announces Lady Hesters
301
Mr Pitt to Mr Grenville June 23
307
Mr Pitt to Mr Grenville July 21
314
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville September 6 Continental
324
Mr Pitt to Earl Temple November 13
330
The Duke of Devonshire to Earl Temple November 15
332
Memorandum by Earl Temple in reply to the Duke of Devon
337
Mr Elliot to Mr Grenville March
340
Mr Pitt to Earl Temple July 22 Reinforcements sent to
346
Earl Temple to Mr Grenville October 4 Sends some impor
352
Countess Temple to Earl Temple January 6 Death of Lady
358
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville June 11
364
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville June 23 Bussy is horrified
371
Lady Hester and Mr Pitt to Mr James Grenville July 22
377
Mr Pitt to Earl Temple August 10 French Ultimatum Pros
385
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville October 2 Mr Pitt and Lord
391
Mr Grenville to Mr Prowse October 14 Requests that he will
398
Earl Temple to Mr Wilkes October 16 Mr Pitts resignation
404
The Earl of Bute to Mr Grenville November 11
416
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville April 10 Despatches from
420
Mr Jenkinson to Mr Grenville April 13 Consternation
439
Mr Martin to Mr Grenville May 21
445
The Earl of Bute to Mr Grenville May 30 Draft of
454
Earl Temple to Mr Wilkes June 27 Militia arrangements
460
Mr Edward Weston to Mr Grenville July 9 Suggestions
463
Earl Temple to Mr Wilkes September 11 Ardent zeal of
469
The Earl of Egremont to Mr Grenville September 26 The
475
The Earl of Egremont to Mr Grenville October 10 Lord Bute
481
Memorandum by Mr Grenville respecting Cabinet arrangements
482
Earl Temple to Mr Wilkes October 17 The Buckinghamshire
488
Earl Temple to Mr Wilkes November 2
494
456
497
ent in
499
Mr Pitt to Earl Temple March 19 Entreats him not to sup

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side xi - These forms are adapted to ordinary occasions ; and therefore persons who are nurtured in office do admirably well, as long as things go on in their common order ; but when the high roads are broken up, and the waters out, when a new and troubled scene is opened, and the file affords no precedent, then it is that a greater knowlege of mankind, and a far more extensive comprehension of things is requisite than ever office gave, or than office can ever give.
Side 498 - BELL (Sir Charles). The Anatomy and Philosophy of Expression, as Connected with the Fine Arts.
Side 501 - BUTTMAN'S LEXILOGUS ; or, a Critical Examination of the Meaning and Etymology of numerous Greek Words and Passages, intended principally for Homer and Hesiod. Translated, and edited, with Explanatory Notes and copious Indexes, by REV.
Side x - With a masculine understanding', and a stout and resolute heart, he had an application undissipated and unwearied. He took public business, not as a duty which he was to fulfil, but as a pleasure he was to enjoy ; and he seemed to have no delight out of this House, except in such things as some way related to the business that was to be done within it.
Side xi - He was bred to the law, which is, in my opinion, one of the first and noblest of human sciences; a science which does more to quicken and invigorate the understanding than all the other kinds of learning put together ; but it is not apt, except in persons very happily born, to open and to liberalize the mind exactly in the same proportion.
Side 502 - Life and Times of Titian, with some Account of his Family, chiefly from new and unpublished records. With Portrait and Illustrations. 2 vols. 8vo. 42s. CUMMING (R. GORDON). Five Years of a Hunter's Life in the Far Interior of South Africa.
Side 496 - BUTTON'S TABLES OF THE PRODUCTS AND POWERS OF NUMBERS. 1781. Folio. Is. 6d. 20. LAX'S TABLES FOR FINDING THE LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE. 1821. 8vo. 10s. 21. LUNAR OBSERVATIONS at GREENWICH. 1783 to 1819. Compared with the Tables, 1821. 4to. 7s.
Side 357 - For the King himself, he seems all good-nature, and wishing to satisfy everybody; all his speeches are obliging. I saw him again yesterday, and was surprised to find the levee-room had lost so entirely the air of the lion's den. This Sovereign don't stand in one spot, with his eyes fixed royally on the ground, and dropping bits of German news; he walks about, and speaks to everybody. I saw him afterwards on the throne, where he is graceful and genteel, sits with dignity, and reads his answers to...
Side 413 - Majesty's consideration ; too proud to receive any mark of the King's countenance and favour, but above all doubly happy could I see those dearer to me than myself comprehended in that monument of royal approbation and goodness, with which his Majesty shall condescend to distinguish me.

Bibliografisk informasjon