Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

Expenditures :

Salaries,
Groceries, coal, etc.,
Repairs and additions,.
Farm,
Deposited to permanent fund,

$1,397 25 1,277 21 641 97 878 72 300 00

Balance Jan. 1, 1900,.

$4,495 15

10 63

$4,505 78

Amount of outstanding bills (loan, groceries, grain, lumber

and coal),

$2,018 95

The permanent fund amounts to

$2,260 55

John W. CARTER, Treasurer,
PETER E. CLARK,
ROBERT R. ENDICOTT,
ANNIE M. KILHAM,
GILBERT A. TAPLEY,
CHARLES WOODBERRY,
PATRICK J. LYNCH,
SAMUEL COLE,

Trustees.

APPENDIX I.

REPORT ON COUNTY TRUANT SCHOOLS.

By FRANK A. HILL, SECRETARY OF THE BOARD.

Based on Reports by Superintendents of the Truant Schools, by John T.

Prince, J. W. MacDonald and G. T. Fletcher, Agents of the

Board, and on Information from Other Sources.

THE COUNTY TRUANT SCHOOLS.

Visitation by the State Board of Education. - The Legislature of 1898 ordered that county truant schools should be subject to visitation by the State Board of Education and by the State Board of Lunacy and Charity, and that said boards should report thereon annually to the Legislature.

Accordingly, agents of the Board have visited the different county truant schools, and made reports thereon to the secretary of the Board. From their reports as well as from such other sources as are available, the material of the present report has been prepared. No attempt has been made to give a complete or exhaustive view of the county truant schools. In some instances the report is limited to educational conditions only.

County Truant Schools of the State. — The following table gives a list of the different county truant schools in the State :

County Truant Schools.

Location.

Superintendent.

No. of Paplls.

36

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

26

.

.

[ocr errors]

Essex, .

Lawrence,

H. E. Swan, Hampden,

Springfield, E. G. Ward, Hampshire and Franklin, Goshen,

W. A. Barrus, Middlesex, .

No. Chelmsford, M. A. Warren, Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth, Walpole, . A. R. Morse, Suffolk, Boston Parental, West Roxbury, Buel C. Day, . Worcester, :

Oakdale,

F. L. Johnson,

116

.

50

196

.

28

Total, .

452

It will be noticed that but ten of the fourteen counties of the State are named in the foregoing list. The counties of Barn

stable, Berkshire, Dukes and Nantucket are by law exempted from maintaining truant schools of their own, but the county commissioners of each of these excepted counties are authorized to avail themselves of any existing county truant school as a place of commitment.

ESSEX COUNTY TRUANT SCHOOL.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. The School. – The Essex County Truant School is located at Lawrence, about two miles below the city, on the bank of the Merrimac River. The buildings were formerly occupied as a school for boys, and owned by the city of Lawrence. At that time the number of pupils was much less than at present. The school, since its change to a truant school, has grown until the buildings are too small to accommodate the number of pupils now there. Much of the cellar has been taken for the steam plant, thus curtailing the playroom and laundry.

A farm of thirty-three acres is connected with the school. It yields hay enough to keep a stock of six cows and three horses, the cows supplying a liberal quantity of healthful food for the pupils. Many vegetables are also raised for home use, and the surplus is readily disposed of at the city, the proceeds of which add materially to the support of the school, as may be seen by the annexed table, and the work affords healthful open-air exercise for the boys.

The health of the pupils has been excellent, not a case of serious illness having occurred during the year.

Reasons for More Uniform Sentences. — The act of the Legislature of 1898, which placed the pardoning power in the hands of the county commissioners, has in some cases seemed to shorten the time of sentence. Formerly most of the sentences were for two years, while now they are for less than eighteen months. Only five towns and cities of Essex County are now represented at the school. One city has committed eighteen pupils, while another city nearly as large has but four. Why is this? As much as possible (with the aid of the truant officers) we keep trace of the lives of the boys after they leave the school. But can it be expected that a large per cent. of

« ForrigeFortsett »