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the powers of courts of probate. The judges of the superior court are elected by the legislature for three years; the justices of the inferior courts, and justices of the peace, are elected quadrennially by the people; and the clerks of the superior and inferior courts, biennially.

The constitution grants the right of suffrage to all citizens and inhabitants who have attained the age of twenty-one years, and have paid all the taxes which may have been required of them, and which they may have had opportunity of paying, agreeably to law, for the year preceding the election, and shall have resided six months within the county.

FLORIDA.

The constitution of this state was formed by a convention of delegates chosen by the people, and was adopted by said convention in January, 1839, but Florida remained under a territorial government until the 3d of March, 1845, when it was admitted into the Union as a state by act of Congress.

The legislative power is vested in a General Assembly, consisting of a senate and house of representatives. The senators are elected by the people, in districts, for two years, one half of the number going out of office every year. The present number of senators is seventeen. The representatives are elected by the people, by counties, annually, their number never to exceed sixty; at present, forty-one are chosen. The annual election takes place on the first Monday in October, and the legislature meets at Tallahassee on the fourth Monday in November of each year.

The executive power is vested in a governor, who is chosen by the people once in four years, and he is not eligible for the four years next succeeding his term of office.

The judicial power is vested in a supreme court, having appellate jurisdiction only, and composed of the circuit judges for five years after the election of those judges, and thereafter until the general assembly shall otherwise provide; also in circuit courts, the state being divided into four circuits, in each of which a judge of the supreme court has jurisdiction. These judges have also equity powers until a separate chancery court shall be established by thfe legislature. The judges are elected by the legislature, at first for five years; after that term, during good behavior. There are also courts of probate, held by a judge of probate, one being appointed for each county in the state.

The right of suffrage may be exercised by every free white male, aged twenty-one years, or upward, who has resided in Florida for two years, and in the county for six months, and who shall be enrolled in the militia, or by law exempted from serving therein. The general assembly shall provide for the registration of all qualified voters.

No laws shall be passed to emancipate slaves, or to prohibit the immigration of persons bringing slaves with them. The general assembly may prevent free colored persons from entering the state.

No act of incorporation shall be passed or altered, except by the assent of two-thirds of each branch of the legislature. No bank charter shall be granted for more than twenty years, nor shall it ever be extended or renewed. The capital of a bank shall not exceed one hundred thousand dollars, nor shall a dividend be made, exceeding ten per cent, a year. Stockholders shall be individually liable for the debts of the bank, and no notes shall be issued for less than five dollars. The credit of the state shall not be pledged in aid of any corporation whatsoever.

For an amendment of the constitution, two-thirds of both houses of the general assembly must assent; the proposed alteration must then be published six months before the succeeding election, and then be again approved by a two-third vote in the succeeding assembly.

ALABAMA.

The constitution was formed at Huntsville, in August, 1819.

The legislative power is vested in two branches, a senate and house of representatives, which together are styled the General Assembly of the State of Alabama.

The representatives are elected annually, and are apportioned among the different counties in proportion to the white population; the whole number cannot exceed one hundred, nor fall short of sixty. The present number is one hundred. The senators are elected for three years, and one-third of them are chosen every year. Their number cannot be more than one-third, nor less than one-fourth of the number of representatives. There are thirty-three at present.

The executive power is vested in a governor, who is elected by the people for two years; and is eligible four years out of six.

The representatives and one-third of the senators are elected annually on the first Monday in August, and the day following; and the governor is elected biennially at the same time.

The general assembly meets annually (formerly at Tuscaloosa, in future at Montgomery), on the fourth Monday in October.

The right of suffrage is possessed by every white male citizen of twenty-one years of age, who has resided within the state one year preceding an election, and the last three months within the county, city, or town, in which he offers his vote,

The judicial power is vested in a supreme court (consisting of three justices), which has appellate jurisdiction only; in a court of chancery, consisting of three chancellors, the state being divided into three chancery districts; in circuit courts, each held ly one judge, the state being divided into eight circuits, and such inferior courts as the legislature may establish. The judges of the supreme and circuit courts, and the chancellors, are elected by a joint vote of the two houses of the general assembly, for six years.

MISSISSIPPI.

The original constitution of this state was formed at the town of Washington, near Natchez, in August, 1817; and the present revised constitution was formed by a convention, at Jackson, in October, 1832.

The legislative power is vested in a senate and house of representatives, together styled the Legislature of Mississippi. The senators are chosen for four years, by the people, by districts, one-half being elected biennially; and their number cannot be less than one-fourth, nor more than one-third of the whole number of representatives.

The representatives are chosen by the people, by counties, every two years, on the first Monday in November, and the day following; their number not to be less than thirty-six nor more ihan one hundred, which last is the present number fixed. The legislature meets at Jackson, on the first Monday in January, biennially.

The executive power is vested in a governor, who is chosen by the people, qualified as electors, for two years, and cannot hold the office more than four years, in any term of six years. The secretary of state, treasurer, and auditor of public accounts, are all chosen by the people, for two years.

The judicial power is vested in a high court of errors and appeals, held at least twice a year, consisting of three judges, chosen by the people for six years, one being elected in each of the three districts into which the state is divided, and one of the three judges being chosen biennially; in a circuit court, held in each county at least twice in each year, the judges being chosen by the people of each judicial district, and holding their office four years; in a superior court of chancery, the chancellor being chosen by the people of the whole state for six years; in a court of probate, the judge being elected by the people of each county for two years; justices of the peace and constables are also elected for two years.

Every free white male person, of the age of twenty-one years or upward, who shall be a citizen of the United States, and shall have resided in the state one year next preceding an election, and the last four months within the county, city, or town, in which he offers to vote, is a qualified elector. The mode of election is by ballot.

LOUISIANA.

The original constitution of this state was formed in 1812, and the present revised constitution formed by a convention of delegates in May, 1845, was accepted by the people in November, 1845.

The legislative power is vested in a senate and house of representatives, both together styled the General Assembly of the State of Louisiana.

The senators are elected by the people, by districts, for a term of four years, one half being chosen every two years, at the time of the election of representatives. The present number of senators is thirty-two.

The representatives are elected by the people by parishes, apportioned according to population, for a term of two years. Their number is not to be more than one hundred, nor less than seventy. Their present number is ninety-eight.

The executive power is vested in a governor, who is elected by the people for a term of four years; and is ineligible for the next four years. A lieutenant-governor is chosen at the same time.

The biennial elections are held in November, and the sessions of the legislature are to be held biennially, at such place as may be fixed upon by the legislature, which must not be at New Orleans, or within sixty miles of that city. The sessions are to commence the third Monday in January, and the period of the session is limited to sixty days.

The legislature is prohibited from granting any bank charters, or renewing any now in existence; it is prohibited also from loaning the credit of the state, or borrowing money, except in case of war, invasion, or insurrection.

The judicial power is vested in a supreme court of four judges, which has appellate jurisdiction only, and such inferior courts as the legislature may establish. The state is divided into twelve or more districts, in each of which there is a judge for the district courts. The life-tenure of the judges is abolished by the new constitution; those of the supreme court are to be appointed for eight years, and of the lower courts for six years. Sheriff's, coroners, clerks of court and justice of the peace, are to be elected by the people.

The right of suffrage is extended to all white males above twenty-one years of age, who have resided two consecutive years in the state; provided that no naturalized citizen" can vote until two years after he becomes a citizen.

All citizens are disfranchised, both as to voting and holding office, who may fight, or in anyway be connected with fighting a duel, either in or out of the state.

ARKANSAS.

The constitution of this state was formed by a convention of delegates, at Little Rock, in January, 1836.

The legislative power is vested in a general assembly, consisting of a senate and house of representatives.

The senators are elected by the people, by districts, for a term of four years; the representatives by counties, for two years.

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