The Poetical Works of Joseph Addison, Gay's Fables, and Somerville's Chase: With Memoirs and Critical Dissertations

Forside
J. Nichol, 1859 - 386 sider

Inni boken

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 140 - The unwearied sun, from day to day, Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an Almighty hand. Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth...
Side 140 - Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth ; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Side 50 - Amidst confusion, horror, and despair, Examined all the dreadful scenes of war: In peaceful thought the field of death surveyed, To fainting squadrons sent the timely aid, Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage.
Side 145 - THE Lord my pasture shall prepare, And feed me with a shepherd's care ; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye : My noon-day walks he shall attend, And all my midnight hours defend.
Side xxv - I fared like a distressed Prince who calls in a powerful neighbour to his aid. I was undone by my auxiliary. When I had once called him in, I could not subsist without dependence on him.
Side 312 - Though battle call me from thy arms, Let not my pretty Susan mourn; Though cannons roar, yet, safe from harms, William shall to his dear return. Love turns aside the balls that round me fly, Lest precious tears should drop from Susan's eye.
Side 141 - WHEN all thy mercies, O my God! My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view, I'm lost In wonder, love, and praise. 2 O how shall words with equal warmth, The gratitude declare, That glows within my ravish'd heart ! But thou canst read it there.
Side 191 - Tis necessary Wolves should eat. If, mindful of the bleating weal, Thy bosom burn with real zeal, Hence, and thy tyrant lord beseech ; To him repeat the moving speech: A Wolf eats sheep but now and then, Ten thousands are devour'd by men. An open foe may prove a curse, But a pretended friend is worse.
Side 311 - William, who high upon the yard Rock'd with the billow to and fro, Soon as her well-known voice he heard, He sigh'd, and cast his eyes below; The cord slides swiftly through his glowing hands, And (quick as lightning) on the deck he stands. So the sweet lark...
Side 152 - For dignity composed, and high exploit : But all was false and hollow ; though his tongue Dropt manna, and could make the worse appear The better reason, to perplex and dash Maturest counsels...

Bibliografisk informasjon