Engendering Legitimacy: Law, Property, and Early Eighteenth-century Fiction

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Bucknell University Press, 2006 - 231 sider
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Engendering Legitimacy: Law, Property, and Eighteenth-Century Fiction is a study of the intersecting of law, land, property, and gender in the prose fiction of Mary Davys, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, and Jonathan Swift. The law of property in early modern England established relations for men and women that artificially constructed, altered, and ended their connections with the material world, and the land they lived upon. The cultural role of land and law in a changing economy embracing new forms of property became a founding preoccupation around which grew the imaginative prose fiction that would develop into the English novel. Glover contends that questions of political and legal legitimacy raised by England's Revolution of 1688-89 were transposed to the domestic and literary spheres of the early 1700s.
 

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Innhold

Acknowledgments
9
List of Abbreviations
11
Introduction
13
Conceiving the Civil Subject Property Power and Prose
19
Who Shall Inherit the Earth? Jonathan Swift and the Jure Paterno
43
Laying Claim to Title Mary Davys and Authorial Dispossession
74
The Incomplete Tradesman Daniel Defoe and the Lay of the Land
101
Heirs of the Flesh Eliza Haywood and the Body of Law
133
Conclusion
157
Notes
162
Bibliography
198
Index
227
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Om forfatteren (2006)

Susan Paterson Glover is Assistant Professor of English at Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario.

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