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CHAPTER XXIV.

Commencement of the summer campaign-Forward movement of

the army of Virginia—Cavalry fights in Loudoun and Fauquier

counties—The cavalry fight near Middleburg, 19th of June--I

am severely wounded--Stay at Upperville, and retreat from there

to Mr B.'s plantation—The last eighteen months of my stay in

the Confederacy-Departure for Richmond, and sojourn at the

capital and in the vicinity-Winter 1863-64-Stuart's death-

Departure for England,

. 283

MEMOIRS

OF THE

CONFEDERATE WAR.

CHAPTER X.

CHANGE OF BASE-CROSSING OF THE SHENANDOAH-FIGHTS IN

LOUDOUN AND FAUQUIER-CROSSING OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK-FIGHTS IN THE REGION BETWEEN THE HAZEL AND RAPPAHANNOCK RIVERS—HEADQUARTERS NEAR CULPEPPER COURT-HOUSE-MY DEPARTURE FOR RICHMOND—FIGHTS AT

THE POTHOUSE AND ALDIE-RECEPTION AT MIDDLEBURG.

GENERAL M‘CLELLAN, the Federal Commander-inChief, having largely reinforced his army with regiments from the new levy of 300,000 volunteers called out for nine months, and having brought it to a strength of 140,000 men, well equipped in every respect, had at last determined upon a forward movement, all unknowing at the time that the supreme command was soon to be taken from him by the Government at Washington. The right wing of the

VOL. II.

А

2

PLANS AND COUNTER-PLANS.

Federal forces, by a strong demonstration towards Harper's Ferry, made a show of invading Virginia from this point, but the great bulk of the army crossed the Potomac about fifteen miles lower down, near the little town of Berlin. General Lee, having been opportunely informed by his vigilant cavalry of the enemy's operations, had commenced, in the mean time, a movement on the opposite side of the Blue Ridge, in a nearly parallel direction towards Front Royal, being about a day's march ahead. Longstreet's corps was in the advance, Jackson's troops following slowly, covering the rear, and still holding the passes of the Blue Ridge, Snicker's, Ashby's and Chester Gaps. The cavalry under Stuart had orders to cross the Ridge at Snicker's Gap, to watch closely the movements of the enemy, retard him as much as possible, and protect the left flank of our army.

So we rode quietly along in the tracks of our horsemen, who, before the Staff had left “ The Bower," had proceeded in the direction of Berryville. Our mercurial soldiers were as gay as ever, and even the most sentimental members of the Staff had rallied from the despondence incidental to departure from our late encampment, when during the afternoon we reached en route the little town of Smithfield, where, under Bob Sweeney's direction as impresario, we managed to get up a serenade for the

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