The Gentleman's and London Magazine: Or Monthly Chronologer, 1741-1794

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J. Exshaw., 1741
 

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Side 81 - Men, therefore, in society having property, they have such a right to the goods, which by the law of the community are theirs, that nobody hath a right to take them, or any part of them, from them without their own consent; without this they have no property at all. For I have truly no property in that which another can by right take from me when he pleases against my consent.
Side 395 - ... any false news or tales, whereby discord, or occasion of discord or slander, may grow between the King and his people, or the great men of the realm ; and he that doth so, shall be taken and kept in prison, until he hath brought him into the court, which was the first author of the tale.
Side 26 - ... if our trade may be taxed, why not our lands ? Why not the produce of our lands and everything we possess or make use of ? This we apprehend annihilates our charter right to govern and tax ourselves. It strikes at our British privileges, which, as we have never forfeited them, we hold in common with our fellow subjects who are natives of Britain.
Side 520 - ... for defraying the charge for allowances to the feveral officers and private gentlemen of the two troops of horfe guards, and regiment of horfe, reduced, and to the...
Side 81 - The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property...
Side 306 - Cursed be their anger, for it was fierce; and their wrath, for it was cruel: I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel.
Side 350 - She was civilly received by the mother, who bid her welcome — when it was too late. But her daughter Hannah lay at his back, to cut them off from all opportunity of exchanging their thoughts. At her return home, on hearing the bell toll out for his departure, she screamed aloud that her heart was burst, and expired some moments after.
Side 282 - Gentlemen, may soon be shewn to you and all Men to be weak, and to have neither Law nor Reason for their Foundation, so cannot long stand you in stead : Therefore, you had much better as yet leave...
Side 467 - It was then I first began to trouble myself with the difference between the principles of Whig and Tory ; having formerly employed myself in other, and I think much better speculations.
Side 590 - It happens to very few men, in any age or country, to come into the world with so many advantages of nature and fortune, as the late Secretary Bolingbroke : Descended from the best families in England, heir to a great patrimonial estate, of a sound constitution, and a most graceful, amiable person : But all these, had they been of equal value, were infinitely...

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