The Repository, Or, Treasury of Politics and Literature for ...: Being a Complete Collection of the Best Letters (including Those of Junius) and Essays from the Daily Papers, Volum 2

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J. Murray, 1771
 

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Side 431 - Sullen and severe without religion, profligate without gaiety, you live like Charles the Second, without being an amiable companion, and, for aught I know, may die as his father did, without the reputation of a martyr.
Side 425 - In a heart void of feeling, the laws of honour and good faith may be violated with impunity, and there you may safely indulge your genius.
Side 174 - I'll beg your's and the Dean's acceptance of). You must look on me no more a poet, but a plain commoner, who lives upon his own, and fears and flatters no man. I hope before I die to...
Side 476 - ... blessings of your reign, and paid you in advance the dearest tribute of their affections. Such, Sir, was once the disposition of a people, who now surround your throne with reproaches and complaints. Do justice to yourself.
Side 449 - We owe it to our ancestors, to preserve entire those rights which they have delivered to our care : we owe it to our posterity, not to suffer their dearest inheritance to be destroyed.
Side 477 - On your part we are satisfied that every thing was honourable and sincere, and if England was sold to France, we doubt not that your majesty was equally betrayed.
Side 459 - As well might VERRES have returned to Sicily. You have twice escaped, my Lord; beware of a third experiment. The indignation of a whole people, plundered, insulted, and oppressed as they have been, will not always be disappointed.
Side 436 - His views and situation required a creature void of all these properties ; and he was forced to go through every division, resolution, composition, and refinement of political chemistry before he happily arrived at the caput mortuum of vitriol in your grace.
Side 459 - They are still base enough to encourage the follies of your age, as they once did the vices of your youth.
Side 482 - The Praetorian bands, enervated and debauched as they were, had still strength enough to awe the Roman populace: but when the distant legions took the alarm, they marched to Rome, and gave away the empire.

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