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along constantly on three legs, keeping one of them up as if to rest it.

“ The Skye terrier has a great deal of quiet intelligence, learning to watch his master's looks and understand his meaning in a wonderful manner. This dog shows great impetuosity in attacking vermin of all kinds, though often his courage is accompanied by a kind of shyness and reserve ; but when once roused by being bit or scratched in its attack on vermin, the Skye terrier fights to the last, and shows a great deal of cunning and generalship as well as courage.

Unless well entered when young they are apt to be noisy, and yelp and bark more than fight. The terriers I have had of this kind show some curious habits, unlike most other dogs. I have observed that when young they frequently make a kind of seat under a bush or hedge, where they will sit for hours together crouched like a wild animal. Unlike other dogs, too, they will eat (though not driven by hunger) almost anything that is given them, such as raw eggs, the bones and meat of wild ducks or wood pigeons and other birds that every other kind of dog, however hungry, rejects with disgust. In fact, in

In fact, in many respects their habits resemble those of wild animals. They always are excellent swimmers, taking the water quietly and fearlessly when very young.”

My favourite author then proceeds to write of their use in taking his master quickly up to a wounded deer, but, irrespective of the latter, no one can say that St. John's description does not altogether tally with that of the Scottish terrier. It is over a quarter of a century since the late Captain Mackie gave me a small, semi-prick eared dog he had got from the north of Scotland, from which the above description might have been taken. It ran at times on three legs, was slow to be the aggressor, but was a terrible punisher for a fourteen pound dog when he did start; and he, too, was at times shy and reserved, and would eat grouse and pigeon as freely as he would any butchers' meat, and he liked the “wee burn troot" likewise.

Long before I owned this dog a friend of mine had a similar one sent out of Caithness-shire, which was called a "Skye terrier," but again he turned out to be just a Scottish little fellow, short on the legs, hard in coat, and as game as possible. Both these were brown brindles in colour, which I fancy were at that time more plentiful than the black brindles or almost black dogs, oftener, seen on the show bench to-day.

It was about the year 1874 that a newspaper controversy brought the Scottish terrier prominently before the public, and the Crystal Palace shows and the one at Brighton the following year, viz., in 1876,

along constantly on three legs, keeping one of them up as if to rest it.

“ The Skye terrier has a great deal of quiet intelligence, learning to watch his master's looks and understand his meaning in a wonderful manner. . This dog shows great impetuosity in attacking vermin of all kinds, though often his courage is accompanied by a kind of shyness and reserve; but when once roused by being bit or scratched in its attack on vermin, the Skye terrier fights to the last, and shows a great deal of cunning and generalship as well as courage.

Unless well entered when young they are apt to be noisy, and yelp and bark more than fight. The terriers I have had of this kind show some curious habits, unlike most other dogs. I have observed that when young they frequently make a kind of seat under a bush or hedge, where they will sit for hours together crouched like a wild animal. Unlike other dogs, too, they will eat (though not driven by hunger) almost anything that is given them, such as raw eggs, the bones and meat of wild ducks or wood pigeons and other birds that every other kind of dog, however hungry, rejects with disgust. In fact, in many respects their habits resemble those of wild animals. They always are excellent swimmers, taking the water quietly and fearlessly when very young.”

My favourite author then proceeds to write of their use in taking his master quickly up to a wounded deer, but, irrespective of the latter, no one can say that St. John's

John's description does not altogether tally with that of the Scottish terrier. It is over a quarter of a century since the late Captain Mackie gave me a small, semi-prick eared dog he had got from the north of Scotland, from which the above description might have been taken. It ran at times on three legs, was slow to be the aggressor, but was a terrible punisher for a fourteen pound dog when he did start; and he, too, was at times shy and reserved, and would eat grouse and pigeon as freely as he would any butchers' meat, and he liked the wee burn troot” likewise.

Long before I owned this dog a friend of mine had a similar one sent out of Caithness-shire, which was called a “ Skye terrier," but again he turned out to be just a Scottish little fellow, short on the legs, hard in coat, and as game as possible. Both these were brown brindles in colour, which I fancy were at that time more plentiful than the black brindles or almost black dogs, oftener seen on the show bench to-day.

It was about the year 1874 that a newspaper controversy brought the Scottish terrier prominently before the public, and the Crystal Palace shows and the one at Brighton the following year, viz., in 1876,

provided classes for them, which, however, failed to fill. Then there came a lull, a club was formed, and in 1879 Mr. J. B. Morrison, of Greenock, was invited to the Alexandra Palace show to judge the Scotch terriers in a class which had been provided for them. A few months later divisions were given them at the Dundee gathering, when the winner, though a pure “Scottie," was called a Skye terrier, and came from that island Birmingham provided a class in 1881, and with an incompetent judge the prizes were withheld, though such men as the late Captain Mackie, Mr. Ludlow, and Mr. J. A. Adamson were exhibitors. The Curzon Hall show appears to have been rather unfortunate in this sort of thing, for previously the leading prize in wire-haired fox terriers was withheld when there was as good a specimen of the variety as we ever saw on the bench or in the ring at any time. However, another year things went better with the Scottish terriers, as in 1883 Messrs. Ludlow and Blomfield, of Norwich, to whom much of the credit for the popularisation of the breed in England is due, again made entries and won chief honours with their little dogs Rambler and Bitters. Two years later the late Captain Mackie was the most successful competitor, securing the leading prizes with his historical Dundee and his lovely little bitch Glengogo.

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