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However, this is the Yorkshire terrier now, and will no doubt remain so till the end of his time, or until his place is usurped by other dogs which, certainly not handsomer, will be less difficult to keep in prime coat and in good condition. It has been said that the late Mr. Peter Eden, of Manchester, so noted in his day for pigs and bulldogs, had “invented” the Yorkshire terrier. This he had not done, although in its early day he owned some very excellent specimens, which for the most part he had purchased from the working men in Lancashire. They were their breeders, and delighted to show them at the local exhibitions, of which that at Middleton, near Manchester, was the chief. Here, and at the Belle Vue shows, were always to be found the choicest specimens, which their owners treasured with great care, and who had to be uncommonly “hard up ” to be induced to sell their favourites. They would get 7620 or J630 for a good specimen, more if it was “ extra special,” and this at a time when dogs did not run to so much money as they do now. We have on record that Mrs. Troughear, of Leeds, sold her little dog Conqueror to Mrs. Emmott, wife of an American actor, for £250. Still, since its first introduction the Yorkshire terrier has not progressed in public estimation; indeed the contrary is the case, the reasons for which will be plainly enough told before the conclusion of this chapter.

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Originally this terrier was a bigger dog than heis to-day, specimens of Iolb. to 14lb. weight being not at all uncommon, so repeatedly classes hadbeen provided for them in two sections—dogs over 8lb. and dogs under that weight—whilst in addition there mightbe divisions for rough-haired toy terriers, the maximum allowed being 61b. At the time I write, Yorkshire terriers over 81b. weight are seldom 'seen at our canine gatherings, the prevailing weight being from 4lb. to 6lb.; but the club scale still allows for three classes, .51b. and under; 71b. but not under 51b; and over 71b. No specimen should, however, exceed 12lb. in weight.

The Yorkshire terrier at his best is a smart, handsome little dog, and some I have known were handy as rat-killers, although as a rule kept aspets and for show purposes. If running outside on awet or dirty day, their beautiful long, silky coat getsbedraggled,-sometimes almost spoiled and ruined; and even in the house extraordinary care and much skill are required to keep the jacket of the Yorkshire; terrier in order. Indeed, itv has been said that the number of exhibitors in this country who thoroughly understand the treatment of this little pet dog can be counted on the fingers of the two hands. Whether this is so or not I will not commit myself by saying, but I do know that Yorkshire terriers shown by one who “knows how ” and by one who does “ not know how” are terribly different in appearance. Indeed, the extraordinary length and profusion of coat to be found on a perfect specimen are in a certain degree due to artificial aid, for, when the dog is comparatively young, its skin is dressed daily with an ointment or wash which acts in a wonderful manner in stimulating and promoting the growth of the hair.

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The puppies when born are quite black, and those darkest in hue usually turn out to be the best in colour when fully coated and matured, which is not until they are about two years old. Not long ago I had a letter from someone who was about to bring an action against a well-known “fancier” because he had sold him a bitch in pup to a pure bred dog, and when the pups were born they were black with faint tan shadings on them. The purchaser destroyed the puppies; but before bringing the action he intended, and having the vendor before the Kennel Club, he wrote to the Field, when he was told how foolishly he had acted in the transaction. Rather curious are these great changes in the appearance and colour of some puppies, and it is well known that Dalmatians, spotted carriage dogs,

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are invariably produced from their dam quite free from black or brown markings.

When the Yorkshire terrier is about three to four months old, his colour begins to change down the sides, on his legs, &c. ; but even at nine or ten months the back is still very dark, excepting in such specimens as eventually turn out too silvery and light in colour when fully matured. As a rule no more attention than daily washing, combing, and brushing need be paid to the puppy until it is approaching, say, ten months in age, when the coat is commencing to “break in colour” and increase in length and denseness. Then the following preparation should be obtained and rubbed thoroughly into the roots of the hair once a week: Tincture of cantharides, 1 ounce; oil of rosemary, % an ounce; bay rhum, % of a pint; olive oil, % a pint, and white precipitate, I drachm. At the same time the puppy must be kept scrupulously clean and not allowed to run about too much. Indeed, he ought to be housed or kennelled in a case, one about 18in. by 14in. and some 16in. depth being the most adaptable size. A cushion should be used to lie upon, as hay, straw, shavings, &c., are liable to become entangled in the coat, of course to its detriment. As I have said, the dressing must be applied once a week, and done thoroughly, but twice a day, i.e., night and morning, the coat should be thoroughly well brushed. It may occasionally be combed, but when the latter is being done, great care must be taken not to break any of the hairs or pull out any of the jacket. In addition the dog must be washed each week, and continuously wear on his hind feet “boots” or “shoes,” or “socks” or “stockings,” or whatever one likes to call them, of wash-leather. Such are sometimes made from linen or other material, but wash or chamois leather appears to be the best for the purpose. These of course prevent the little fellow from spoiling his coat by scratching, at the same time preserving the hair on the feet.

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In due course the hair on the head or skull of ' the dog will increase in length, and when grown sufficiently, it should be tied up and plaited; this must be done afresh daily, at the same time it has to be well brushed, care being taken that none of the hairs become matted or stick to each other. There is a special brush used for the purpose, rather smaller than the ordinary toilet article, with the bristles about three inches in length; a suitable article costs about five shillings. The Yorkshire terrier, once upon a time, had, as a rule, his ears cut, but now this mutilation is discontinued we shall find him with the neat drop ears he often carried at the

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