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CHAPTER III.
THE ENGLISH WHITE TERRIER.

ON several occasions I have quoted the number of entries in the “ Kennel Club Stud Book ” as indicative of the rise or fall in popularity of the different varieties of dogs to which they allude. These figures must not always be taken as an actual and infallible guide either one way or the other, for when the first volume of the Stud Book was published the registration of dogs was, as it were, in its infancy. The general public knew little about the thing, and only those intimately connected with shows as exhibitors and breeders took the trouble to have their dogs entered. This is not so now, for pretty nearly everyone who has a dog of good pedigree will have him entered in the Stud Book, whether it be shown or not.

However, so far as the little dog whose name heads this chapter is concerned, the inference may be correctly drawn, for no one believes that this, perhaps the least hardy of all our terriers, is so

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common and easily to be found as he was five-andtwenty years ago. In the first volume of the “ Kennel Club Stud Book,” published in 1874, there are fifty-four entries under the head “English and Other Smooth-haired Terriers,” which did not include black and tans, and was, as a matter of fact, confined to the English white terrier under notice. The second volume contained only ten entries, whilst during 1894. there were twenty-seven registered, the section then being divided according to the sexes. However, about ten years since some little impetus was given the variety by the establishment of a club to look after its interests, and judging from the excellent entry made at Liverpool in 1894 this enterprising body seemed to be doing some service. At this show there was certainly the best collection of white terriers I had seen brought together for many years, and at the same exhibition in 1896, there was likewise a capital entry; but this appeared to be almost a dying endeavour. The latest secretary of the club writes me, at the end of October, 1902, that the body seems to have lapsed, is now nonexistent, and the climax of the downfall of the breed was reached when the Kennel Club at their show the same year crossed their classes out of the schedule. Little is known of the early history of the English white terrier; where he originally sprang from, who

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