Encyclopædia Britannica: or, A dictionary of arts and sciences, compiled by a society of gentlemen in Scotland [ed. by W. Smellie]. Suppl. to the 3rd. ed., by G. Gleig

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Side 397 - If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, and one of you say unto them ; Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled, notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body ; what doth it profit ? Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone.
Side 2 - Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit : For a patriot, too cool ; for a drudge, disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient.
Side 396 - Neither was there any among them that lacked: for as many as were possessors of lands or houses sold them, and brought the prices of the things that were sold, and laid them down at the apostles...
Side 397 - Let your light fo Ihine before men, that they may fee your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.
Side 102 - Hermippus Redivivus : or, the Sage's Triumph over Old Age and the Grave ; wherein a method is laid down for prolonging the life and vigour of man ; including a commentary upon an ancient inscription, in which this great secret is revealed, supported by numerous authorities ; the whole interspersed with a great variety of remarkable and well-attested relations.
Side 21 - Latin ; but my girl sung a song which was said to be composed by a small country laird's son, on one of his father's maids, with whom he was in love ; and I saw no reason why I might not rhyme...
Side 146 - CANTIDM; an ancient territory in South Britain, whence the English word Kent is derived, supposed to have been the first district which received a colony from the continent The situation of Cantium occasioned its being much frequented by the Romans, who generally took their way through it in their marches to and from the continent. Few places in Britain are more frequently mentioned by the Roman writers than Portus Rulupensis.
Side 227 - O Pallas, thou hast failed thy plighted word, To fight with caution, not to tempt the sword. I warned thee, but in vain, for well I knew What perils youthful ardour would pursue ; That boiling blood would carry thee too far ; Young as thou wert in dangers, raw to war. O curst essay of arms, disastrous doom, Prelude of bloody fields and fights to come.
Side 15 - ... four or five inches diameter at the mouth, having the bottom taken off, and the sides well fixed in the clay rammed close about it. Within the pot is a brown water, Thick as puddle, continually forced up with a...
Side 2 - Townshend to lend him a vote; Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit: For a patriot...

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