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CHAPTERI

DUTIES OF THE OFFICER OF THE WATCH

SECTION 1. GENERAL DUTIES

1. The officer of the watch is in charge of a ship's watch section. Ship personnel, except those to whom the officer of the watch is subordinate, must obey all orders of the watch officer. 2. The following personnel are subordinate to the officer of the watch:

a) personnel of command posts and battle stations in a condition of readiness, personnel engaged in matters relating to handling of the ship, lookout and the use of weapons;

b) the watch detail, duty sections and guard detail (except for the Officer of the Deck). 3. The officer of the watch shall:

a) in carrying out his duties be guided by station bills and other instructions concerning combat operations and the daily routine of the ship;

b) maintain the designated condition of readiness of the ship;

c) take charge of the ship's watch section and see to it that personnel carry out their routine duties, and make sure that signalmen and other lookouts stand a vigilant watch;

d) take responsibility for the safety of the ship and take measures to prevent accidents;

e) be familiar with the condition of visual communications and lookout equipment, learn how to use it, and properly employ recognition signals;

f) sound alarms (on order or by acting independently);

g) take responsibility for proper operation of machinery and equipment on the upper deck;

h) make sure that rescue equipment is in a constant state of readiness;

i) demand that all personnel observe ship regulations, wear the prescribed uniform, and maintain order and cleanliness on the upper deck and on the sides of the ship;

j) issue orders and sound alarms in connection with the ship's routine and see to it that they are carried out;

k) salute officials arriving aboard ship, and render proper salutes when meeting and passing other vessels;

1) maintain a rough deck log during the watch and, after being relieved of the watch, sign all entries made in this log.

4. The officer of the watch must be able to direct damage control operations. In event of fire or flooding of a compartment (or space) he immediately sounds the alarm and takes damage control measures, reporting this to the Commanding Officer of the ship and the Officer of the Deck.

5. The officer of the watch must know what measures to take in event of cooler weather, the approach of tropical cyclones (typhoons, hurricanes) and detection of fog.

If the need arises, the officer of the watch has the right, both day and night, to ask the Commanding Officer (or Executive Officer) for permission to go aloft. This permission is requested in the following manner: "Comrade Captain Second Rank, permission is requested to go aloft."

In any unanticipated event or situation, when the officer of the watch is in doubt or when there is a need for assistance, advice or the presence of the Commanding Officer (or Executive Officer), he must immediately ask him to go aloft. In urgent, extreme circumstances, the officer of the watch must act independently, informing the Commanding Officer and others concerned of the situation involved as soon as possible.

6. The officer of the watch must not be distracted by any extraneous activities not related to the fulfillment of his duties.

7. The officer of the watch must be equipped with binoculars, whistle and megaphone. Moreover he must also have a pencil and notebook.

8. In event of alarm, the officer of the watch turns over his duties to the Executive Officer and takes his station according to the station bill.

9. Upon being relieved of the watch, the officer of the watch shall provide information concerning:

a) the designated condition of readiness of the ship;
b) the ship's position (by locality (sic) and chart);
c) recognition signals;
d) operating machinery;
e) the condition and mode of operation of lookout equipment;

f) the position of the Commanding Officer and the Executive Officer as well as the Commanding Officer of the formation and the Chief of Staff;

g) orders and instructions issued by the Commanding Officer of the ship or the Commanding Officer of the formation for the watch;

h) exercises, drills and activities conducted aboard ship;
i) atomic defense equipment;

j) time of the last battery ventilation. 10. The officer of the watch (Officer of the Day) may issue orders affecting all personnel of the ship or subdivisions on the PA system. In issuing a command over the PA system, account must be taken of the immediate situation, and orders should not be given which might reveal the force organization and/or the activity of the ship.

The PA system may be used by the following: the Commanding Officer of the ship, the Executive Officer, the head of the political department, officer of the watch (Officer of the Deck), the officer on duty below decks and the head of the electrical department of a submarine.

SECTION 2. DUTIES UNDERWAY

11. The officer of the watch under way is subordinate to the Commanding Officer of the ship, or to the Executive Officer if the latter, replacing the Commanding Officer, is in the main control room.

No one, aside from the aforementioned and their immediate superiors, may interfere with the orders of the officer of the watch.

12. The officer of the watch is directly subordinate to the Commanding Officer or the Executive Officer in questions related to maneuvering, the use of weapons in event of sudden encounters with the enemy, evasion of attacks by submarines, aircraft and torpedo boats, and also evasion of detected torpedoes and mines. 13. The officer of the watch shall:

a) see that the prescribed course, speed, station of the ship in order, depth and operating conditions and propulsion of a submarine are precisely maintained;

b) observe plotting of the ship's course, periodically determining its position;

c) observe the change in bearing in meeting warships;

d) observe proper operation of running lights and, in navigating without lights, observe complete darkening of the ship;

e) take measures to eliminate emission of smoke, sparks and flames from the stacks if they occur;

f) supervise hoisting of signals whenever there is a change in course, speed and maneuvering;

g) report to the Commanding Officer (or Executive Officer) on everything observed which could affect the safety of navigation or fulfillment of the assigned task, as well as changes in situation and conditions;

h) alert the head of the electrical department one-half hour prior to arrival of the ship at its destination (anchorage, narrows, etc.), and in other cases when deemed necessary.

14. The Commanding Officer sets the course and speed of the ship through the officer of the watch.

The officer of the watch may, without permission from the Commanding Officer, change the course and speed whenever the safety of the ship is threatened; for example, to avoid colliding with another ship upon detection of a sudden navigation hazard, in order to evade sudden attacks by the enemy, and also to rescue a man overboard.

15. The officer of the watch shall keep himself informed of navigating conditions and shall properly inform the helmsman of:

1) changes in course and speed;
2) the beginning and end of a change to a new course;

3) detected beacons and markers threatening the safety of navigation, and all other circumstances having a bearing on the accuracy of course plotting and the safety of navigation.

In this connection, the establishment of a clearly defined relationship between the officer of the watch, navigator and Combat Information Center (CIC) of the ship assumes particular importance. The officer of the watch must personally supervise watch standing by CIC radar operators by periodically scanning the horizon on the circular scope position indicator screen.

16. While navigating in narrows, near shores and shoals, or in approaching them, or whenever the ship's position is in doubt, the officer of the watch shall carefully observe the following precautionary measures:

a) determine the position of the ship using all available methods and means;

b) reduce speed or stop the engines;
c) take depth soundings;
d) use lookout equipment to detect navigation hazards;
e) clear away the anchor and cables;
f) let out anchor in order to detect a hazardous depth;

g) dog down and check hatches and handholes.
17. On submarines navigating submerged, the officer of the watch shall:

a) maintain a 360° periscope lookout when the submarine is operating at periscope depth;

b) look after the trim, buoyancy and depth of the submarine and adjust the trim if necessary;

c) observe the density and voltage of the battery and the percentage content of hydrogen and harmful gases, and report this to the Commanding Officer of the submarine;

d) regulate the movement of personnel between compartments and maintain calm and order in these compartments.

18. When the submarine is lying on the bottom or anchored underwater, the officer of the watch shall:

a) observe the readings on the depth gauge and the trim indicator;

b) make sure that the regeneration system is in good operating condition and the composition of the air is proper, and observe the presence of hydrogen and harmful gases;

c) make sure that the pressure hull is watertight and the battery tanks, bilges and compartments are always dry.

19. The officer of the watch shall remain on the bridge at all times when the ship is under way. Officers of the watch are relieved (or relieved temporarily) with the permission of the Commanding Officer of the ship (or Executive Officer).

20. In addition to the aforementioned (under general duties) the officer of the watch underway, upon being relieved of his watch, shall also provide information concerning:

a) position of the ship (observed or calculated), course according to gyroscopic and magnetic compasses and the time at which the course is changed, speed, nature of the formation or the number of the formation position of the ship in formation;

b) conditions in the area of navigation; beacons, markers, lookout stations, depth, current, meeting and overtaken ships, etc.

c) machinery and equipment propelling and handling the ship, as well as time of inspection of engines operating while surfaced, battery density and battery voltage.

The oncoming officer of the watch shall personally check the position, course, speed and position of the ship in formation.

Moreover, the following information must be provided when the watch is relieved on submarines: operating depth submerged, operating conditions, how the submarine answers the planes, visibility range of the periscope, percentage content of hydrogen and harmful gases, the condition of special air regeneration instruments and equipment, position of the submarine, condition of the negative tank, condition of the battery and ship ventilation, and the procedure for releasing personnel to the bridge.

SECTION 3. DUTIES WHILE ANCHORING OR MOORING

21. With a warship anchoring, mooring to a buoy or alongside, the officer of the watch is subordinate to the Executive Officer (or Officer of the Deck).

Nobody, except for the Executive Officer (Officer of the Deck) and his immediate superiors, may interfere with the orders of the officer of the watch. 22. The officer of the watch shall:

a) report to the Officer of the Deck on everything observed which could affect the safety of anchorage;

b) insure proper use of ship's boats and launches, supervise their launch and recovery and land personnel in them, insuring that they are not loaded beyond their capacity;

c) insure observance of harbor and port regulations by personnel of the ship and passing launches and boats;

d) take necessary measures to insure safe mooring and movement of boats and launches alongside the ship;

e) take necessary measures to render assistance to boats in distress and to rescue those who are drowning;

f) submit a morning report to the Executive Officer, one-half hour before hoisting the colors, in the form prescribed in Appendix 10 of the Navy Regulations.

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