The Spectator

Forside
Putnam, 1856
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Side 48 - Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep : All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night.
Side 12 - It is said he keeps himself a bachelor by reason he was crossed in love by a perverse beautiful widow of the next county to him.
Side 83 - When I read the several dates of the tombs, of some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.
Side 381 - I could discover nothing in it; but the other appeared to me a vast ocean planted with innumerable islands, that were covered with fruits and flowers, and interwoven with a thousand little shining seas that ran among them.
Side 381 - I observed some with scimitars in their hands, and others with urinals, who ran to and fro upon the bridge, thrusting several persons on trap-doors which did not seem to lie in their way, and which they might have escaped, had they not been thus forced upon them. "The genius, seeing me indulge myself in this melancholy prospect, told me I had dwelt long enough upon it. ' Take thine eyes off the bridge,' said he, ' and tell me if thou yet seest anything thou dost not comprehend.' Upon looking up,...
Side 220 - The stout Earl of Northumberland, A vow to God did make, His pleasure in the Scottish woods Three summer's days to take; The chiefest harts in Chevy-Chase To kill and bear away.
Side 289 - ... his virtues, as well as imperfections, are as it were tinged by a certain extravagance, which makes them particularly his, and distinguishes them from those of other men. This cast of mind, as it is generally very innocent in itself, so it renders his conversation highly agreeable, and more delightful than the same degree of sense and virtue would appear in their common and ordinary colours.
Side 6 - Cocoa-tree, and in the theatres both of Drury-lane and the Haymarket. I have been taken for a merchant upon the Exchange for above these ten years, and sometimes pass for a Jew in the assembly of stockjobbers at Jonathan's.
Side 379 - I see a bridge, said I, standing in the midst of the tide. The bridge thou seest, said he, is human life ; consider it attentively.
Side 302 - There is not, in my opinion, a more pleasing and triumphant consideration in religion than this, of the perpetual progress which the soul makes towards the perfection of its nature, without ever arriving at a period in it.