From Many, One: Readings in American Political and Social Thought

Forside
Richard C. Sinopoli
Georgetown University Press, 30. des. 1996 - 448 sider

Unique among readers in American political and social thought, From Many, One is a broad and balanced anthology that explores the problem of diversity and American political identity throughout American history. From the classic texts of the American political tradition to diverse minority writings, this book offers a wide spectrum of ideas about identity, gender, immigration, race, and religion, and addresses how these issues relate to the concept of national unity.

Covering the gamut of viewpoints from majority to minority, from conservative to radical, from assimilationist to separatist, the authors range from the Founding Fathers to Frederick Jackson Turner, from Abigail Adams to bell hooks and Catharine MacKinnon; from Abraham Lincoln to Malcolm X; from Roger Williams to Ralph E. Reed.

Sinopoli's extensive introductory and concluding essays set the context for and draw out the implications of the fifty readings. The conclusion includes case studies of three minority groups—homosexuals, Mexican-Americans, and Chinese-Americans—to illustrate further the themes of the volume. Brief introductions to each reading and to each of the five sections provide background information.

In examining one of the central questions of American public life—the issue of national diversity—From Many, One will be a useful text for courses in American political thought, sociology, American Studies, and American history.

 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Innhold

American Unity and Diversity Political Principles and National Identity
23
The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America In Congress July 4 1776
27
Brutus and Cato
32
The Federalist Papers 1787
45
George Washington Farewell Address 1796
60
Tecumseh Sleep Not Longer O Choctaws and Chickasaws and Father Listen The Americans Have Not Yet Defeated Us By Land
68
FATHER LISTEN THE AMERICANS HAVE NOT YET DEFEATED US BY LAND 1813
71
John C Calhoun A Disquisition on Government 1853
73
Plyler v Doe 457 US 202 1982
222
Michael Walzer Multiculturalism and Individualism 1994
232
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
240
Race and Politics Two Americas or One?
241
Race and Politics Two Americas or One?
243
An Address to the Inhabitants of the British Settlements in America Upon SlaveKeeping 1773
247
Henry David Thoreau Slavery in Massachusetts 1854
255
George Fitzhugh Cannibals All Or Slaves Without Masters 1857
262

Abraham Lincoln The Perpetuation of Our Political Institutions Address Before the Springfield Young Mens Lyceum January 27 1838
77
Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg Address 1863
85
Frederick Jackson Turner The Significance of the Frontier in American History 1893
86
James Bryce The Uniformity of American Life from The American Commonwealth 1908
92
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
97
Gender and Politics Citizenship Equality and Difference
99
Gender and Politics Citizenship Equality and Difference
101
Letters of Abigail and John Adams 1776
105
The Sentiments of an American Woman 1780
109
On the Equality of the Sexes 1790
112
Elizabeth Cady Stanton Lucretia Mott et al Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions Seneca Falls 1848
118
Frances D Gage Sojourner Truth Ant I A Woman? 1851
123
Susan B Anthony Constitutional Argument 1872
126
Elizabeth Cady Stanton Address to the Founding Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association 1890
137
Emma Goldman Woman Suffrage 1917
141
The National Organization for Women Statement of Purpose 1966
150
Feminism A Movement To End Sexist Oppression 1984
156
Catharine A MacKinnon The Sexual Politics of the First Amendment 1986
164
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
172
Immigration and National Identity from the Melting Pot to Multiculturalism
173
Immigration and National Identity From the Melting Pot to Multiculturalism
175
Hector St Jean de Crevecoeur Letters from an American Farmer 1782
181
James Madison et al Report on the Resolutions Concerning the Alien and Sedition Acts 1799
185
KnowNothing Party America for Americans and The Silent Scourge 1855
191
Theodore Roosevelt True Americanism 1897
196
A Study of American Nationality 1915
200
John Dewey Nationalizing Education Address to the National Education Association 1916
208
Korematsu v United States 323 US 214 1944
215
Abraham Lincoln Second Inaugural Address 1865
267
Frederick Douglass Oration in Memory of Abraham Lincoln 1876
269
W E B Du Bois The Conservation of Races 1897 and On Being Ashamed of Oneself 1933
278
An Essay on Race Pride 1933
283
Booker T Washington Democracy and Education 1896
288
Marcus Garvey The Negro and his Weakness 1935 and Be King of Circumstances 1935
294
BE KING OF CIRCUMSTANCES 1935
297
Brown v Board of Education of Topeka Kansas 347 US 483 1954
299
Dr Martin Luther King Jr I Have A Dream 1963
304
Malcolm X The Ballot or the Bullet 1964
309
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
319
Religion and Politics Pluralism and Common Bonds
321
Religion and Politics Pluralism and Common Bonds
323
Roger Williams The Bloudy Tenent of Persecution for Cause of Conscience 1644
329
A Little Speech on Liberty 1645
332
James Madison et al Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments 1785
335
1792
341
Thomas Jefferson Letter to the Danbury Baptists 1802
344
Religion the Only Sure Basis of Free Government 1804
346
Alexis de Tocqueville Indirect Influence of Religious Opinions Upon Political Society in the United States 1835
353
Mark Twain Christian Science 1906 and Walker v Superior Court of Sacramento Cty 47 Cal 3d 112 1988
358
John E Kennedy Remarks on Church and State 1960
366
Lemon v Kurtzman et al 403 US 602 1971
370
Speech to the Economic Club of Detroit 1995
379
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
386
Richard C Sinopoli and Teena Gabrielson Pluralism and Identity Politics Today Three Case Studies
387
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
421
Opphavsrett

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 61 - The unity of government which constitutes you one people, is also now dear to you. It is justly so ; for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence ; the support of your tranquillity at home ; your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize.
Side 66 - It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world; so far, I mean, as we are now at liberty to do it ; for let me not be understood as capable of patronizing infidelity to existing engagements. I hold the maxim no less applicable to public than to private affairs, that honesty is always the best policy. I repeat it, therefore, let those engagements be observed in their genuine sense. But, in my opinion, it is unnecessary, and would be unwise to extend...
Side 67 - ... never cease to view them with indulgence ; and that, after forty-five years of my life dedicated to its service with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent abilities will be consigned to oblivion, as myself must soon be to the mansions of rest. Relying on its kindness in this, as in other things, and actuated by that fervent love towards it which is so natural to a man who views in it the native soil of himself and his progenitors for several generations...
Side 51 - But the most common and durable source of factions has been the verious and unequal distribution of property. Those who hold and those who are without property have ever formed distinct interests in society. Those who are creditors, and those who are debtors, fall under a like discrimination. A landed interest, a manufacturing interest, a mercantile interest, a moneyed interest, with many lesser interests, grow up of necessity in civilized nations, and divide them into different classes, actuated...
Side 51 - The regulation of these various and interfering interests forms the principal task of modern Legislation, and involves the spirit of party and faction in the necessary and ordinary operations of the Government.
Side 65 - In the execution of such a plan nothing is more essential than that permanent, inveterate antipathies against particular Nations and passionate attachments for others should be excluded; and that in place of them just and amicable feelings toward all should be cultivated.
Side 64 - Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labour to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens.

Bibliografisk informasjon