The Eastern Question

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Routledge, 10. jul. 2014 - 676 sider
First Published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
 

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Innhold

I Turkey
1
II The London PressPolicy of Napoleon on the Turkish Question
10
III The Real Issue in Turkey
14
IV The Turkish Question
20
V Turkey and Russia
27
VI The Ultimatum and After
30
VII The English and French FleetsThe TimesRussian Aggrandizement
33
VIII The Russian Humbug
36
LIX Russia and the German Powers
333
LX Turkey and GreeceItaly
340
LXI Austria and ServiaGreece and TurkeyTurkey and the Western Powers
343
LXII The Greek InsurrectionAlliance between Prussia and AustriaRussian Armaments
346
LXIII Bombardment of OdessaAustria and RussiaThe Greek InsurrectionMontenegroManteuffel
349
LXIV Prussian Policy
355
LXV The Exploits in the Baltic and Black SeasAngloFrench System of Operations
360
LXVI Delay on the Danube
367

IX Brunnow and ClarendonArmenian Proclamation
40
X Aberdeen Clarendon BrunnowConnivance of the Aberdeen Ministry with Russia
42
XI Russian Policy against Turkey
48
XII Austria and Russia
54
XIII LayardGladstoneAberdeenPalmerston
56
XIV The RussoTurkish DifficultyDucking and Dodging of the British CabinetNesselrodes Latest Note
58
XV The Russian QuestionCurious Diplomatic Correspondence
64
XVI Russia and the Western Powers
71
XVII Traditional Policy of Russia
76
XVIII The Press on Eastern AffairsNotes of England and Russia
82
XIX Russian MovementsDenmarkUnited States and Europe
87
XX To Withdraw or Not to Withdraw
92
XXI UrquhartBemThe Turkish Question in the House of Lords
94
XXII The Turkish Question in the Commons
103
XXIII Affairs Continental and English
118
XXIV The Vienna Note
123
XXV The Vienna Note continued
128
XXVI The English Ministry OutwittedPanic
134
XXVII The War Question
142
XXVIII The Turkish Manifesto
145
XXIX The Northern Powers
148
XXX War
150
XXXI The Holy War
153
XXXII PersiaDenmark
158
XXXIII Diplomacy Again
161
XXXIV The War on the Danube
163
XXXV The Quadruple ConventionEngland and the War
171
XXXVI The Russian VictoryPosition of England and France
180
XXXVII Private News from St Petersburg
183
XXXVIII Russian Policy
186
XXXIX Palmerstons Resignation
190
XL Progress of the Turkish War
194
XLI England and Russia
201
XLII More Documents
211
XLIII The European War
215
XLIV The War in Asia
222
XLV The Czars ViewsPrince Albert
228
XLVI Cobden and Russia
232
XLVII War Finance
237
XLVIII Blue BooksAmbassadors Withdrawing
240
XLIX Russian DiplomacyThe ShrinesMontenegro
245
L Count Orloffs Proposals
253
LI Debates in Parliament
256
LII KossuthDisraeli and HumeUnited StatesFrance and EnglandGreece
261
LIll France and EnglandThe Greek RisingAsia
271
LIV The Russian Retreat
279
LV The Documents on the Partition of Turkey
285
LVI The Secret Diplomatic Correspondence
298
LVII War DeclaredMussulman and Christian
314
LVIII War with Russia
324
LXVII SpeechesSt Arnaud
372
LXVIII State of the Russian War
379
LXIX The WarDebate in Parliament
387
LXX The Russian Failure
396
LXXI Russia Austria Turkey Wallachia and Redcliffe
400
LXXII Austria
409
LXXIII The Siege of Silistria
413
LXXIV The Theatre of WarThe Russian Note to the German PowersServia and Austria
419
LXXV The Private Conference at ViennaMinisterial Crisis
425
LXXVI Another War Debate
431
LXXVII The AustroTurkish TreatyMore Parliamentary Talk
437
LXXVIII That Bore of a War
448
LXXIX The Russian RetreatDenmark
454
LXXX The Evacuation
457
LXXXI ServiaEngland France and Constantinople
462
LXXXII The Capture of Bomarsund
465
LXXXIII The Condition of WallachiaRevolution in Turkey
467
LXXXIV The Fleet off at LastRevolt of the Moldavians
469
LXXXV The Attack on Sebastopol
474
LXXXVI The Decay of Religious Authority
482
LXXXVII The Military Power of Russia
489
LXXXVIII The Siege of Sebastopol
492
LXXXIX Progress of the War
498
XC British Disaster in the CrimeaThe British War System
506
XCI Russian Diplomatists
513
XCII Affairs in Russia
518
XCIll Fate of the Great Adventurer
521
XCIV Napoleons Last Dodge
526
XCV Prospects in France and England
531
XCVI Napoleons Apology
537
XCVII Panslavism
542
XCVIII Austrias Weakness
545
XCIX The New Arbiter of Europe
551
C Another Vienna Disclosure
554
CI Ministerial Crisis in England
558
CII The Birmingham Conference
562
CIII Austria and England
567
CIV Napier and Graham
573
CV The Great Event of the War
579
CVI Alarums and Excursions
587
CVII The Russians as Fighters
593
CVIII The Russian Loan
600
CIX Traditional English Policy
607
CX The Fall of KarsI
611
CXI The Fall of KarsII
620
CXII The Fall of KarsIII
631
CXIII The Fall of KarsIV
641
Index
649
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Om forfatteren (2014)

Karl Heinrich Marx, one of the fathers of communism, was born on May 5, 1818 in Trier, Germany. He was educated at a variety of German colleges, including the University of Jena. He was an editor of socialist periodicals and a key figure in the Working Man's Association. Marx co-wrote his best-known work, "The Communist Manifesto" (1848), with his friend, Friedrich Engels. Marx's most important work, however, may be "Das Kapital" (1867), an analysis of the economics of capitalism. He died on March 14, 1883 in London, England.

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