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The wind-flower and the violet, they perish'd long

ago, And the brier-rose and the orchis died amid the

summer glow; But on the hill the golden-rod, and the aster in the

wood, And the yellow sunflower by the brook, in autumn

beauty stood, Till fell the frost from the clear cold heaven, as falls

the plague on men, And the brightness of their smile was gone from

upland, glade, and glen.

And now, when comes the calm mild day, as still

such days will come, To call the squirrel and the bee from out their

winter home ; When the sound of dropping nuts is heard, though

all the trees are still, And twinkle in the smoky light the waters of the

rill, The south wind searches for the flowers whose

fragrance late he bore, And sighs to find them in the wood and by the

stream no more.

And then I think of one who in her youthful beauty

died, The fair meek blossom that grew up and faded by

my side.

In the cold moist earth we laid her when the forest

cast the leaf, And we wept that one so lovely should have a life

so brief ; Yet not unmeet it was that one, like that young

friend of ours, So gentle and so beautiful, should perish with the

flowers,

WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT.

THE RAINY DAY.

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary ;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,

And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary ;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast,

And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart ! and cease repining ;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining ;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.

HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW.

[graphic]

“ WHEN I CONSIDER HOW MY LIGHT' IS SPENT.

ON HIS BLINDNESS.

WHEN I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide,
Lodg’d with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lesi he returning chide;
Doth God exact day labor, light deny’d,
I fondly ask? but patience to prevent
That murmur soon replies, God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts; who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best : his state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed,
And post o'er land and ocean without rest ;
They also serve who only stand and wait.

John Milton.

BREAK, BREAK, BREAK.

BREAK, break, break,

On thy cold gray stones, O Sea!
And I would that my tongue could utter

The thoughts that arise in me.

O well for the fisherman's boy

That he shouts with his sister at play!
O well for the sailor lad

That he sings in his boat on the bay!

And the stately ships go on;

To their haven under the hill;

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But O for the touch of a vanish'd hand,

And the sound of a voice that is still !

Break, break, break,

At the foot of thy crags, O Sea !
But the tender grace of a day that is dead

Will never come back to me.

ALFRED TENNYSON.

ABOU BEN ADHEM AND THE ANGEL.

ABOU BEN ADHEM (may his tribe increase) Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace,

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