Speeches of the Late Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan: (Several Corrected by Himself)

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Side 194 - He has already declared) to meet any disposition to negociation on the part of the enemy, with an earnest desire to give it the fullest and speediest effect...
Side 218 - Parliament their famous motion, that an humble address be presented to his Majesty that he would be graciously pleased to remove the Right Honourable Sir Robert Walpole...
Side 21 - To bereave a man of life, or by violence to confiscate his estate, without accusation or trial, would be so gross and notorious an act of despotism, as must at once convey the alarm of tyranny throughout the whole kingdom. But confinement of the person, by secretly hurrying him to gaol, where his sufferings are unknown or forgotten; is a less public, a less striking, and therefore a more dangerous engine of arbitrary government.
Side 330 - That an humble address be presented to his Majesty, that he will be graciously pleased to give directions that a monument be erected in the Cathedral Church of ST.
Side 21 - Of great importance to the public is the preservation of this personal liberty ; for if once it were left in the power of any, the highest, magistrate to imprison arbitrarily whomever he or his officers thought proper, (as in France it is daily practiced by the crown,) (A;) there would soon be an end of all other rights and immunities.
Side 111 - Nort'i moved in the House of Commons for leave to bring in a bill "for the better regulating the government of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.
Side 290 - That his Majesty's ministers, having authorised and directed, at different times, without the consent, and during the sitting of Parliament, the issue of various sums of money for the service of his Imperial Majesty, and also for the service of the army under the Prince of Conde, have acted contrary to their duty, and to the trust reposed in them, and have thereby violated the constitutional privileges of this House.
Side 101 - ... of such measures as may tend to alleviate the present distress, and to prevent, as far as possible, the renewal of similar embarrassments in future. Nothing has been omitted on my part that appeared likely to contribute to this end ; and you may be assured of my hearty concurrence in whatever regulations the wisdom of parliament may adopt on a subject so peculiarly interesting to my people, whose welfare will ever be the object nearest my heart.
Side 370 - An elderly lady in the city, of great credit and long standing, who had lately made a faux pas, which was not altogether inexcusable. She had unfortunately fallen into bad company, and contracted too great an intimacy and connection at the St. James's end of the town. The young gentleman, however, who had employed all his arts of soft persuasion...
Side 380 - From these and other causes they are fully of opinion that the Governor and Deputy Governor can give no advice to Mr. Pitt in favour of such a measure, which is indeed of a wide political extent, and beyond the line of their duty to judge of.

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