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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

SPECIAL BULLETIN +

Issued Under the Direction of
THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION

JOHN MITCHELL, Chairman
EDWARD P. LYON

JAMES M. LYNCH
LOUIS WIARD

HENRY D. SAYER
WILLIAM S. COFFEY, Secretary

No. 91
JANUARY, 1919

A PLAN FOR SHOP
SAFETY, SANITATION AND HEALTH

ORGANIZATION

USINI
757

Prepared by
THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS AND INFORMATION

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INTRODUCTION

VALUE OF SHOP SAFETY ORGANIZATION The indispensable function of accident prevention and maintenance of cleanliness and orderliness is carried on haphazardly in most manufacturing plants. Instead of centralizing the work in the care of one person, it is generally divided up and parts are added to the other duties of several of the managerial staff. As the management and its subordinates are mostly preoccupied with the more pressing responsibilities of production and marketing, shop safety, sanitation and health usually receive but incidental and unsystematic attention. Even where the management assigns a person to supervise this work, its failure to realize the significance of this phase of shop management often leads it to choose one who can be spared rather than one best qualified for this highly important task. Yet these matters vitally affect the compensation insurance premium as well as plant output. Practical business men, who have resorted to this form of shop activity, testify enthusiastically that a safe and sanitary shop not only means fewer accidents but a more efficient working force. Since it is good business to prevent accidents and maintain orderliness and cleanliness in the factory, supervision of the work is assigned to a competent person, who can give to it whatever time is required in accordance with the size of the working force and the hazard of the industry.

Nothwithstanding that a large percentage of the accidents can be prevented only by the good will and coöperation of the employees, the average employer has done little to enlist their aid. He relies upon safeguards alone, whereas a cursory study of his accident records would indicate that a large proportion of accidents cannot be prevented by them. Those employers who are aware of this fact arrive at the hasty conclusion that the worker is “careless." This opinion, if voiced publicly, instead of imbuing the workers with cautiousness and a desire to coöperate with the management, actually stirs up "bad blood.” Very few employees are deliber

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