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DEATH OF FRANK E. ARMSTRONG.
(Senate Joint Resolution No. 42.)

WHEREAs: Late Thursday afternoon, June 19, 1919, while in active discharge of intensive journalistic duties incident to the closing hours of the Fifty-first General Assembly, Frank E. Armstrong, for many years the Legislative Correspondent and Political Editor of the Chicago Daily News, was suddenly stricken and expired upon the public street in the city of Springfield; and WHEREAs : This tragic event has brought profound sorrow and grief to hundreds of officials, public men and citizens generally, who were privileged to meet him frequently and claim him as a personal friend; and WHEREAs: Frank E. Armstrong was pre-eminent because of his grasp of public affairs and legislative and civic needs and his familiarity with officials in State, county and city administrations and exerted an unusually wholesome influence through the columns of his paper in aiding the public in exercising discrimination and judgment in electing men of character and ability to public office; and WHEREAs: By reason of his keenness and marked intellectual attainments, coupled with an unusual appreciation of the value of efficient and honest administration in State and civic affairs he appreciated the need of greater and widening scope in social and industrial welfare legislation and an increasing non-partisan activity by Illinois citizens in all civic matters, and encouraged the enactment of legislation promotive thereof; he was increasingly effective and WHEREAs: Mr. Armstrong was a man of clean personal life, kind and courteous to all, tender and devoted to his family, quick to give wide credit and encouragement to any and all who rendered true public service as the members of this Assembly can personally bear witness to, and at all times exemplified the value and influence of wholesome Christian living, and properly directed industry and endeavor; now therefore, be it Resolved, by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring herein, That we express our admiration for Mr. Armstrong's achievements in life, his high character and attainments, our personal respect, esteem and friendship for him, as well as our sympathy for his newspaper ass0ciates and superiors, and for his widow and children, to whom his loss brings the profoundest grief; and, be it further Resolved, That this preamble and resolution be spread on the Journals of the Senate and House of Representatives; that a suitably engrossed copy thereof be sent to the family; that a committee be appointed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives to attend the funeral; and that as a further mark of respect, the Senate and House of Representatives do now take a recess. Adopted by the Senate June 20, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives, June 20, 1919.

DEATH OF HON. THOMAS E. MERRITT. (House Joint Resolution No. 6.) WHEREAs, We have learned with deep regret of the death of the Hon. Thomas E. Merritt on the 25th day of December, 1918, at Salem, Marion County, Illinois; and WHEREAs, The deceased was a member of the House of Representatives for twelve years and a member of the State Senate for eight years, and during his term of service in the General Assembly he was a forceful leader of his party and sponsored much of the epoch making legislation of the time; and WHEREAs, The deceased was a prominent figure in the public affairs of the State, having, while a member of the General Assembly, placed in nomination for United States Senator from Illinois the names of Hon. William R. Morrison and Hon. John M. Palmer, and also having been elected a

delegate to three Democratic National conventions, twice as delegate at large; therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the Fifty-first General Assembly of the State of Ilinois expresses its deep regret at the loss to the State of Illinois and to his community of so faithful a public servant and citizen, and that it extends its sympathy to the members of the bereaved family; and be it further Resolved, That these resolutions be spread on the records of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and that a copy thereof duly authenticated be forwarded by the Clerk of the House of Represenatives to the family of the late Mr. Merritt. Adopted by the House, February 5, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, February 6, 1919.

DEATH OF HON. CHARLEs A. WALKER.
(House Joint Resolution No. 22.)

W II EREAs, The Hon. Charles A. Walker, a former member of the House of Representatives and a former member of the Senate of the State of Illinois, departed this life at his home in the city of Carlinville, Illinois, On March 25, 1918; and

W HEREAs, The deceased as a member of both branches of the General Assembly gave to his constituents and to the State of Illinois, by untiring industry, faithful zeal and unblemished integrity, the fullest measure of devoted service; therefore, be it

Resolved, That the sincere sympathy of the House of Representatives and the Senate be, and the same is hereby, extended to the bereaved relatives and intimate and personal friends of our deceased former fellowmember: and, be it further

Resolved, That this preamble and resolution be spread on the records of the Fifty-first General Assembly; that a suitably engrossed copy thereof be forwarded to the family; and, as a further mark of respect to his memory, that the House do now adjourn.

Adopted by the House, April 22, 1919.

Concurred in by the Senate, June 10, 1919.

DE MobiLIzATION of Soldi ERS For FARM LABOR. (House Joint Resolution No. 17.) WHEREAs, There exists at this time a very great scarcity of farm labor in this State and the demand for labor on the farm is continually increasing and will continue to do so as the harvest season approaches; and WHEREAs, We are urged by Federal officials, by State officials, by proclamations of Congress, by resolution of State Legislatures, by demand for appropriations of money to carry on public improvements, by the voice of the press of the country, to furnish employment for the unemployed and especially for the demobilized and returning soldiers of the late World's War: and WHEREAs, We are constantly informed through the press and by various civic organizations and employment bureaus and agencies that great numbers of released soldiers are in need of employment; and WHEREAs, It is our wish and patriotic duty to do all within our power to give employment and dignified relief to all seeking employment, and to take such action as will meet the requirements of the employer, and those seeking employment; and WHEREAs, Both from official sources and newspaper interviews and reports, it is found that great numbers of released and returned soldiers are not experienced in farm labor or adapted to its requirements; and WHEREAs, Large numbers of men who are experienced and adapted to farm occupations are retained in the service; therefore, be it

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That United States military and civilian officials having in charge the demobilization of the United States troops, both in home cantonments and in the overseas service, be requested through the two United States Senators and the members of the House of Representatives in Congress from Illinois to so far as possible and so far as may be just and consistent demobilize without delay such men as shall clearly prove by their records on entering the service that they are adapted to argicultural occupations and who are willing to return to such occupation.

Adopted by the House April 8, 1919.

Concurred in by the Senate April 22, 1919.

EMPLOYMENT OF SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 11.) WHEREAS, The cessation of hostilities in the World War has come upon us sooner than anticipated, and in advance of plans or preparation for readjustment from war to peace; and WHEREAs, The soldiers and sailors from the State of Illinois are daily returning in great numbers, and the return flow of soldiers from overseas has as yet scarcely begun; and WHEREAs, There appears to be great difficulty in placing our soldiers and sailors in suitable employment; and WHEREAs, The re-absorbing powers of peace industries are at present insufficient to take care of discharged war workers and soldiers and sailors; and WHEREAs, Ample provision should be made for the employment of our soldiers and sailors, in order that they shall not be compelled to accept public charity; and WHEREAS, The working people generally of this country, as American citizens, are entitled to living wages and good living conditions, commensurate with the vast wealth and enormous resources of this, the richest country in the world; and WHEREAs, The State of Illinois is ready and anxious to provide suitable employment for all its citizens; and WHEREAs, Labor and capital are united in urging that steps shall be taken to provide employment at once to tide over the dangerous transition from War to Peace; and WHEREAs, Many public improvements throughout the State of Illinois have been postponed on account of the war; now, therefore, be it Resolved, by the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Representatives concurring therein. That the Legislature will, upon request, render all necessary assistance and co-operation with the counties, cities, villages, towns, municipalities, park districts, drainage districts, boards of education, sanitary district, and all other public bodies in the State of Illinois, to facilitate said bodies in making necessary public improvements; and will pass whatever legislation is necessary to assist said bodies in making necessary public improvements; and, be it further Resolved, That all counties, cities, villages, towns, municipalities, park districts, drainage districts, boards of education, sanitary district, and all other public bodies in the State of Illinois, be, and they are hereby urged to take immediate steps to start work at once on public improvements coming properly within their sphere and under their supervision, in order to give employment to the unemployed; and, be it further Resolved, That a copy of this resolution shall be forwarded by the Secre tary of the State to the proper public bodies in the State of Illinois. Adopted by the Senate, February 12th, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives March 6th, 1919.

ENDORSEMENT OF THE AMERICAN LEGION. (House Joint Resolution No. 28.) WHEREAS, The young manhood of Illinois enthusiastically and patriotically responded to the call of our Government in doing its great part in the late World's War; and, WHEREAs, These our loyal and honored soldiers having performed such valiant and heroic service as to bring credit to themselves and to crown American arms with victory; and, WHEREAs, These our honored soldiers, numbering more than 350,000 from Illinois, are now being demobilized and returned to civilian life; and, WHEREAs, These men are now engaged with other millions of their comrades in arms from the other states of the Union in forming at this time their patriotic and permanent veterans' organization, known as THE AMERICAN LEGION; and WHEREAs, We recognize that the proposed Illinois chapter of the said AMERICAN LEGION will wield a great and good influence for economic, social, political and patriotic advancement within our Commonwealth; therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the General Assembly of Illinois hereby declares and registers its approval of this patriotic movement, and that it extends to our soldier citizenship its endorsement, and that it hereby gives assurance of moral support in this undertaking which already has taken concrete form in Illinois and elsewhere. Adopted by the House, June 5, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, June 10, 1919.

ExPREssion of APPRECIATION TO OLD SALEM LIN colN LEAGUE AND
HoN. Hoyt ER J. TICE.
(House Joint Resolution No. 25.)

WHEREAs, In accepting the invitation of Hon. Homer J. Tice, more than two hundred State officials and Members of the General Assembly visited the site of New Salem, the early home of Abraham Lincoln, on Thursday, May 1, 1919, as the guests of the Old Salem Lincoln League, and the citizens of Petersburg; now, therefore, be it

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the Members of the Fifty-first General Assembly express their deep appreciation of the hospitality of Hon. Homer J. Tice, the Old Salem Lincoln League and the citizens of Petersburg, on the occasion of their visit to the site of New Salem; and, be it further

Resolved, That the Members of the General Assembly express their pride in the knowledge that the beautiful and historic site of New Salem is to be forever preserved by the State of Illinois, free to the people, as the Old Salem State Park; and, be it further

Resolved, That this preamble and resolution be spread on the Journals of the House and Senate; that copies thereof, suitably engrossed, be forwarded to Hon. Homer J. Tice, to the President of the Old Salem Lincoln League, and the Mayor of Petersburg.

Adopted by the House, May 6, 1919.

Concurred in by the Senate, May 7, 1919.

FORT CREVE COUER—Location. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 37.) WHEREAs, The location of Fort Creve Couer, built by Sieur de LaSalle, being the first fort erected in Illinois, has not been officially established by the State of Illinois: THEREFORE, Be it resolved by the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Representatives concurring herein, that the Department of Education and Registration is hereby requested to conduct an investigation for the purpose of establishing the site of said Fort Creve Couer; that said Department report its findings to the next General Assembly, and that its findings as to such location shall be considered the true site of said Fort for all State purposes. Adopted by the Senate June 17, 1919. , Concurred in by the House of Representatives June 18, 1919.

HEALTH PROMOTION WEEKS. (House Joint Resolution No. 14.) WHEREAs, More than twenty-four thousand men, women and children in the State of Illinois died of communicable diseases during the past fiscal year; and WHEREAS, More than eighty-three thousand cases of communicable diseases were reported during the past fiscal year to the Department of Public Health; and W HEREAs, It is conservatively estimated that in Illinois the annual cost of diseases, which are communicable, and therefore preventable, is upwards of one hundred fifty-five million dollars ($155,000,000); now, therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the week beginning on the second Sunday in May, 1919, and 1920, are hereby designated as Health Promotion Weeks throughout the State of Illimois; and, be it further Resolved, That the Fifty-first General Assembly hereby recommends to the people of Illinois that during the weeks thus designated, they shall emphasize in every possible way the need for united action against all communicable diseases and the causes thereof; and, be it further Resolved, That the Department of Public Health shall be and is hereby designated as the agency through which the programs and activities of the ..people during said Health Promotion Weeks shall be carried out. Adopted by the House, March 26, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, March 27, 1919.

ILLINois CENTENNIAL CoMMISSION, MATERIAL OF ETC., To BECOME PROPERTY OF ILLINois STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY. (House Joint Resolution No. 26.) WIIEREAs, The Illinois Centennial Commission in carrying out the Centennial observance including the compiling of the Centennial History of the State accumulated a considerable amount of material including historical manuscripts, copies of historical material, office equipment, etc.; and WHEREAs, It seems advisable that the material and property collected by the Centennial Commission be made the property of some permanent department of the State of Illinois; therefore, be it Resolved, By the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, that all books, newspaper files, manuscripts, pictures, sterotype plates and other illustrative material, office equipment or property of any kind whatsoever purchased or collected by the Illinois Centennial Commission shall when said Centennial Commission shall have completed its duties, become the property of the Illinois State Historical Library and be under the charge and control of the Board of Trustees of said Illinois State Historical Library. Adopted by the House, May 14, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, June 4, 1919.

INToxic ATING LIQUoB-RATIFICATION OF FEDERAL AMENDMENT.
(Senate Joint Resolution No. 3.)

WHEREAs, Both Houses of the Sixty-fifth Congress of the United States of America, by a constitutional majority of two-thirds thereof, proposed an

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