Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

amendment to the constitution of the United States of America, which should be valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitution of the United States when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the states, which resolution is in words and figures following, to-wit:

“JOINT RESOLUTION

Proposing an amendment to the constitution of the United States.

1. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following amendment to the Constitution be, and hereby is, proposed to the states, to become valid as a part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of the several states as provided by the Constitution:

“ARTICLE

“SECTION 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited. “Section 2. The Congress and the several states shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Section 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several states, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the states by the Congress” now, therefore, be it Resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring herein: SECTION 1. That said proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America be and the same is hereby ratified by the General Assembly of the State of Illinois. Section 2. That certified copies of this preamble and joint resolution be forwarded by the Governor of this State to the Secretary of State at Washington, D. C., to the presiding officer of the United States Senate, and to the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States. Adopted by the Senate, January 8, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives, January 14, 1919.

INVESTIGATION OF ZION CITY AND WILBUR GLENN VoI.IVA.
(House Joint Resolution No. 11.)

WHEREAs, An institution calling itself “The Christian Catholic Apostolic Church of Zion,” located at Zion City in the State of Illinois, and one Wilbur Glenn Voliva, the owner or pretended owner of all or nearly all the real estate in said city, and by profession claims to be endowed with Supernatural powers and is represented as claiming direct communication with Divine Power; and

WHEREAs, It is represented that said institution and its said pretended owner and overseer, Wilbur Glenn Voliva, through such supernatural and divine powers is and has been enticing and encouraging citizens of this and other states to invest large sums of money in leases of land in said city and in other Zion enterprises, and by and through such leases pretending to extend over a period of a thousand years, it is charged that the same is a mere means and pretense to secure and enveigle the moneys and property of innocent persons under the guise of a false and fictitious religion; and that said institution through that and other means is using the city government of Zion City, the schools of said city and the courts of said city, to carry out its illegal and fraudulent purposes in securing property and oppressing those citizens of the State of Illinois who do not conform to the pretended beliefs of said insitution, and that in many other and divers ways, as it is represented, the said institution and its overseer, by controlling the rents, lots and homes, the business, the municipal school and judical government of said city, is and has become a blot upon the State of Illinois and is and has been depriving citizens of said city of the rights of citizenship and of a free government, and is and has been misrepresenting and fraudulently stating to the public its financial status and its religious beliefs, and is besng run for the purpose of defrauding the public; and WHEREAs, There are other persons, institutions and pretended organizations soliciting funds, deceiving the people and preying upon the public of the like and similar nature; therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That a committee of ten be appointed, five from the House and five from the Senate, to investigate the said institution and said other persons, institutions and pretended organizations; and be it further Resolved, That said committee is hereby fully authorized to take evidence and have the power to summon before it, or such sub-committee as said committee may appoint, witnesses and documents as said committee may find necessary to do, to fully and completely investigate and examine into all of the affairs of said institution and said overseer and said other persons, institutions and pretended organizations, and to report the same with the recommendations of said committee to both Houses of the General Assembly; and be it further Resolved, That said committee have full power, with the assent of the Speaker of the House and President of the Senate, to employ a sergeant-atarms and a secretary and such stenographers as may be necessary to fully and completely carry out said investigation. Adopted by the House, March 5, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, April 9, 1919.

INVITATION TO HON. WILLIAM H. TAFT. (House Joint Resolution No. 9.) WHEREAs, It seems possible to secure the presence of the Hon. William H. Taft, a former President of the United States, to discuss before the General Assembly of Illinois the subject of a League of Nations as the same is now being discussed before the Peace Conference at Versailles, France; and WHEREAs, This is a subject in which all people are interested and in regard to which all people, and especially the General Assembly, desire information and invite discussion; therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the Hon. William H. Taft, former President of the United States, be invited, at his pleasure in the near future to address the General Assembly of Illinois upon the subject of a League of Nations. Adopted by the House, February 20, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, February 20, 1919.

IRISH PEOPLE–RIGHTS AT PEACE CONFERENCE.
(House Joint Resolution No. 2.)

WHEREAs, The Allied powers associated with the United States about to assemble in conference for the purpose of drafting terms of peace affecting the settlements of various questions arising out of the World War, and for the purpose of drafting agreements affecting the rights of the nations in: volved in said war, and for the purpose of readjusting conditions brought about by said war relative to those nations whose people are either subject to or whose National integrity has been endangered by the autocratic powers responsible for said war; and

WHEREAs, The Allied powers associated with the United States have subscribed to the fourteen principles enunciated by President Wilson as a basis

for a just peace, one of which principle is that the people of all nations forming a separate and distinct race in a particular country have the right of self determination in the creation of the administering power of government within their borders to the end that the power of government may conform to their ideas of justice and freedom, thereby preventing their subjection by governments or peoples foreign to their race and ideals; and WHEREAs, The Allied powers associated within [with the United States have given assurances to many of the smaller nations that they will guarantee that such rights of self determination will be provided for in the final treaties or agreements which shall be presented by the Peace Commissioners to the various powers for signature and ratification by said powers; and WHEREAs, The people of the State of Illinois believe that the right of self determination or self rule ought to and does apply to all nations no matter under whose rule such people are subject, and believing further that the people of Ireland come within the classification of such nations, and believing further that consistent with justice and humanity the Irish people are entitled to the same rights as other subject nations. Therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives of the State of Illinois, the Senate concurring herein, That the representatives of the people of the United States at the Peace Conference be requested to present to said conference the claims of the Irish people to the right of self government, and that they further be requested to exercise their influence to bring about a just consideration of the Peace Conference of the rights of the Irish people to govern themselves, and that said representatives of the United States at the Peace Conference further exercise their influence so that the Irish people may receive such measure of self determination as is consistent with justice and humanity towards the Irish people. Be it further Resolved, That these resolutions be spread on record in the Journal of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, and a copy of same properly attested with the Great Seal of State and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate, the Secretary of State and the Governor of Illinois, be forwarded to the President of the United States and to the representatives of the United States at the Peace Conference. Adopted by the House January 14, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate April 22, 1919.

ITALIAN GoverNMENT—CLAIMS BEFoRE PEACE CONFERENCE.
(House Joint Resolution No. 5.)

WHEREAs, The Allied Powers associated with the United States are assembled in conference for the purpose of drafting terms of peace affecting the settlements of various questions arising out of the World War; and for the purpose of drafting agreements affecting the rights of the nations involved in said war; and for the purpose of readjusting conditions brought about by said war, relative to those nations whose people are either subject to or whose national integrity has been endangered by the autocratic powers responsible for said war; and

WHEREAs, In addition to the sympathy and interest which the people of the United States of America have for Italy as an ally, there is a sentimental interest in Italy because Italy was the mother of modern civilization and because Italy is the birthplace of Christopher Columbus, who discovered America; and

WHEREAs, Italy has fought, with heroism and great sacrifice since its entry into the war, and has done its share in bringing about the great victory of the Allies; and

WHEREAs, Italy is making claims at the Peace Conference for the restoration to it of certain lands and territory formerly belonging to it, and for

[ocr errors]

lands and territory which it is alleged are necessary for its economic needs, and for its national security and preservation; now, therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives of the State of Illinois, and Senate concurring herein, That the Representatives of the People of the United States at the Peace Conference be requested to exercise their influence to bring about a just consideration of the claims of the Italian Government for the restoration to it of its lands and territory and of its claim for lands and territory which it is alleged are necessary for its economic needs and for its national security and preservation; and be it further Resolved, That these resolutions shall be spread on record in the Journal of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, and that a copy of the same properly attested with the Great Seal of State and signed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of he House of Representatives, the Secretary of State and the Governor of Ilinois, be forwarded to the President of the United States and to the Representatives of the United States at the Peace Conference. Adopted by the House February 5, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate June 5, 1919.

JEWISH PEOPLE-PERSECUTION IN POLAND AND ROUMANIA. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 38.) WHEREAS: It has been charged by persons, worthy of belief, that many people of the Jewish faith, including men, women and children, have recently in different parts of Poland and Roumania been murdered, tortured and otherwise illtreated and subjected to pillage; and WHEREAS: The existence of such a situation, if in fact it does exist is, in this day of enlightened civiliation, deplorable in the extreme; and WHEREAs: The conditions which are alleged to exist in Poland and Roumania should be investigated so that proper steps may be taken, if need be, to remedy the situation; now therefore be it Resolved, by the Senate, the House of Representatives of the State of Illinois concurring therein: That the Government of the United States of America, through its proper officials, investigate said charges and that the United States of America use its good offices and influences to end the persecution, if any there be, of the people of the Jewish faith in Poland and Roumania; and be it further Resolved: That a copy of this resolution, under the seal of State, be sent by the Secretary of State, to each member of Congress from this State. Adopted by the Senate June 19, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives, June 20, 1919.

JEWISH PEOPLE—RIGHTS IN PALESTINE. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 27.) WHEREAs. The future prosperity and peace of the world depends upon a just and equitable settlement of the European war whereby each and every nationality, however small, be granted the liberty to determine its own destiny and the opportunity of living its own life; and WHEREAs, The government of the United States of America is recognized as an ardent exponent of the rights of the small nations; therefore, be it Resolved, By the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Repre: sentatives concurring therein, that the national aspirations and historic claims of the Jewish people with regard to Palestine be recognized at the peace conference, in accordance with the British government's declaration of November second, nineteen hundred and seventeen, that there shall be established such political, administrative and economic conditions in Pales. tine as will assure the development of Palestine into a Jewish common: wealth, and that the American representatives at the peace conference shall use their best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this object; be it furth or

Resolved, By the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Representatives concurring therein, that express provisions be made at the peace conference for the purpose of granting the Jewish people in every land the complete enjoyment of life, liberty, and the opportunities for national development to the end that justice may be done to one of the most suffering people on earth—the Jewish people; and be it further Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted by the Secretary of the State of Illinois to the President of the United States. Adopted by the Senate, April 22, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives May 7, 1919.

JOINT RULES OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE. (House Joint Resolution No. 27.) Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the following be adopted as the Joint Rules of the House and Senate of the Fifty-first General Assembly, to-wit: 1. When a message shall be sent from the Senate to the House of RepreSentatives, it shall be announced at the door of the House by the doorkeeper, and shall be respectfully communicated to the Chair by the person by whom it may be sent. 2. The same ceremony shall be observed when messages shall be sent from the House of Representatives to the Senate. 3. Messages shall be sent by such persons as a sense of propriety in each House may determine to be proper. 4. In every case of disagreement between the two Houses, if either House request a conference, and appoint a committee for that purpose, the other House shall appoint a committee to confer there with upon the subject of their disagreement. Said committee shall meet at a convenient time to be agreed upon by their chairman, and, having conferred freely, each shall report to its respective House the result of their conference. In case of an agreement the report shall be first made, with the papers referred accompanying it, to the disagreeing House, and there acted upon; and such action shall be immediately reported by the Clerk to the other House, the papers referred accompanying the message. In case of disagreement, the papers shall remain with the House which referred them. The agreeing report of a conference committee shall be made, read and signed in duplicate by all Imembers of the committee, or by a majority of those of each House, one of the duplicates being retained by the committee of each House. Should either House disagree to the report of the committee, such House shall appoint a second committee and request a second conference, which shall be acceded to by the other House before adhering. The motion for a committee of conference, and the report of such committee, shall be in order at any time. When both Houses shall have adhered to their disagreement, a bill or resolution is lost. 5. While bills are on their passage between the two Houses they shall be accompanied by a message signed by the Secretary or Clerk (as the case Inay be) respectively. 6. After a bill has passed both Houses, it shall be enrolled before it is presented to the Governor. 7. When bills are enrolled, they shall be examined by a joint committee, which shall consist of five members, two from the Senate and three from the House, to be appointed by the Senate and the Speaker of the House respectively. The clerk of the Committee on enrolling, transcribing and typing of bills of the respective Houses shall act as clerk of the committee when. ever their services are required. Said committe shall carefully Compare the enrolled bills with the engrossed bills, so passed by both Houses, correct any errors which may be discovered in the enrolled bills, and make their report forth with to their respective Houses; the Secretary or Clerk having previously certified on the margin of the roll in which House it originated.

« ForrigeFortsett »