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8. After examination and report, each bill shall be signed in the respective Houses, by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and by the President of the Senate. 9. After a bill shall have been signed by the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives, it shall be presented by said Joint Committee to the Governor for his approval. The said committee shall report the day of presentation to the Govenor to each House, which time shall be carefully entered on the Journals of each House. 10. All resolutions and memorials which are to be presented to the Governor shall be previously enrolled, examined, signed and presented to the Joint Committee, reported, and entry made thereof, as provided in case of bills. 11. When a bill or resolution which shall have passed one House is rejected in the other, information thereof shall be given to the House in which the same shall have passed. 12. When the consideration of any bill, memorial, or resolution, which has originated in one House shall be postponed in the other to a day so distant that it shall not be taken up again by the present session, the House in which such bill, memorial or resolution shall have originated shall be forth with informed of such postponement. 13. When a bill, memorial or resolution which has passed one House is rejected in the other, it shall not again be introduced during the same session. except in the House so rejecting, and after three days' notice and leave of that House. 14. Each House shall transmit to the other all papers on which any bill or resolution shall be founded. 15. While the two Houses are acting together upon elections, or any other matter, the Speaker shall preside, and all questions of order shall be decided by him, subject to an appeal to both Houses, as though but one body was in session. A call of members of either House may be had in joint meet. ing by order of the House in which the call is desired, and to constitute a quorum of the Joint Assembly, a majority of all the members elected to both Houses shall be present and voting. 16. Motions to postpone or adjourn shall be decided by a joint vote of both Houses, and yeas and nays upon such motions, if required shall be entered upon the Journals of both Houses. 17. Upon questions arising requiring the separate decision of either House, the Senate shall withdraw until the decision is made. Provided, that questions upon motions for a call of either House shall not come within the provisions of this rule. 18. Each House shall have the liberty of ordering the printing of bills messages and reports without the consent of the other. 19. Whenever any message, bill, report or document shall be ordered to be printed by the Senate or House, for the use of both Houses, it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Senate or Clerk of the House (as the case may be) immediately to report the fact of the passage of such order to the other branch of the General Assembly, together with the number so ordered to be printed in case the same shall exceed 300. Adopted by the House, May 23, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, June 3, 1919.

MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS—CoNSERVATION OF Forests. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 31.) WHEREAs, The United States during the last half century has witnessed the reduction of the forest in one region after another. The white plm" forests of Pennsylvania, New York, and New England disappeared nearly a half century ago. Likewise the pine forests of the Lake states for the most part were obliterated before 1900. The Southern pineries which to 20 years have been the main supply of lumber for Illinois and other Central

states will, according to statements recently made by authoritative sources, be to a large extent exhausted within the next ten years. WHEREAs, The effect of the exhaustion of the commercial forests has been the closing of nearby industries which depended upon these forests for supplies and the shifting of local population to new centers, involving heavy penalties upon both the industries and the people. As another result the country has observed the area of cutover timber land increase to an area estimated by the Secretary of the Interior at 228 million acres. Far the greater part of this land is in the North, South, and East and a very large percentage of it is non-agricultural. With recurring destructive forest fires millions of acres of it have become waste and can only be restored to productiveness through an extensive program of reforestation. WHEREAS, The wood-using industries not depending upon uncertain local forest supplies have become centered to a very large extent in the thickly populated districts east of the Mississippi River and are drawing their Supplies from the remaining forests in the Eastern states, the Gulf states and the states adjacent to the Great Lakes. A large number of such industries are located in the State of Illinois, with the City of Chicago the center of a very large and important group. Chicago has for many years been the chief lumber distribution point of the United States, and the greatest point of lumber distribution in the world. These important industries including the manufacture of railway cars, boxes, sashes and doors, farm machinery, furniture, pianos, vehicles and many other articles are now threatened by the exhaustion of the forests from which their supplies have been drawn. They now face the necessity of bringing timber from the Pacific Coast with heavy freight charges added to the cost. To the same Pacific Coast supply the country must look for lumber for general construction purposes. The transportation system of the country must add to its present burdens the transcontinental shipment of very large quantities of lumber, a bulky product upon which a high freight rate greatly increases the cost to the consumer. WHEREAs, Such forests as are owned and managed by the Government, the National Forests, are 97 per cent in the far west and for that reason cannot contribute substantially to the solution of the problem of wood supplies which has become so threatening to the industries of the Eastern States. WHEREAs, The situation is of such gravity as to require the most careful censidera ion by the Federal government and the states to the end that policies may be adopted that will lead to the solution of the problem. Therefore, be it resolved, by the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Representatives concurring therein, That the Fifty-first General Assembly of the State of Illinois urges the attention of the President and the Congress of the United States to the present timber situation and recommends that, without delay, there be formulated such a National program of forestry as will insure the future timber supplies required by the industries of the country. As an example of what should be done, this General Assembly points to the wise course of the Republic of France in so managing its forests for more than a century that they contributed substantially to the winning of the great War. It is further urged that the Federal government acting independently or in co-operation with the states inaugurate action looking towards such measure of public control of the remaining bodies of original timber as will make sure that their supplies will be available as needed by the industries. It is furthermore urged that comprehensive plans be put into effect for restoring the forest on cutover lands which are non-agricultural in character in the Eastern states, in the states bordering the Great Lakes, and in the South, in order that timber supplies from these regions may be available to the established industries of the Central and Eastern states. Be it Resolved, That the Secretary of State of Illinois be, and hereby is directed to transmit copies of this preamble and resolution to the President of the United States, the United States Senate and to the House of Representatives and to The Forester of the United States Department of Agri

culture.
Adopted by the Senate June 4, 1919.
Concurred in by the House of Representatives June 5, 1919.

MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS—EXTRA PAY FOR SOLDIERs. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 6.) WHEREAs, The most important problem of reconstruction is the individual readjustment in the lives of the men who willingly went forth to heroically serve our Nation and our Allies in the time when free institutions and the rights of free men everywhere were threatened, and WHEREAs, No adequate provision is being made by the Federal government for these returning soldiers, sailors and marines, who have made tre. mendous sacrifices for our country, and WHEREAs, There is a movement to secure national legislation guaranteeing to every soldier, sailor and marine his pay for some sufficient period after his return to civil life, until he can obtain remunerative employment, and WHEREAs, Other countries which have suffered more and which have expended far greater sums of money that [than] has the United States of America, are making more ample and more just provisions for their soldiers, Be it Resolved, by the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Representatives concurring therein, That a memorial be sent to Congress requesting the Federal government to pay at least six months salary to every soldier, sailor and marine upon his return to civil life, and Be it Resolved, That the Secretary of State be, and hereby is directed to transmit copies of this resolution to the United States Senate and to the House of Representatives and to the several members of both bodies representing the State of Illinois, and to Hon. Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War, and to Hon. Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy. Adopted by the Senate January 28, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives, January 29, 1919.

MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS—NATIONAL SOLDIER SETTLEMENT ACT. (House Joint Resolution No. 32.) WHEREAs, There is now pending before the House of Representatives of the Congress of the United States, H. R. 487, “A Bill to provide employment and rural homes for those who have served with the military and naval forces through the reclamation of lands to be known as the ‘National Soldier Settlement Act; ' " and WHEREAs, This bill appropriates the sum of five hundred millions of dollars for the reclamation and improvement of lands, to be sold to memhers of the military and naval forces of the United States and of her Allies in the World War, at cost, as farms, and for the employment of these soldiers and sailors in that work; and WIIEREAs, The provisions of this bill possess great merit as a part of a program of readjustment and reconstruction; now, therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the members of the Fifty-first General Assembly of the State of Illinois request the members of the Congress from the State of Illinois to endeavor to bring about the passage of H. R. 487 or of similar legislation at as early a date as possible; and, be it further Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to each member of the Congress from the State of Illinois. Passed the House, June 17, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, June 20, 1919.

MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS—RAIL ROAD RATEs. (Senate Joint Resolution No. 14.) WHEREAs, Many public improvements for which there is an imperative need have been postponed on account of the existence of a state of war between the United States of America and the Imperial German government; and WHEREAs, The necessity for the resumption of the construction of public works is fully recognized and is being urged upon all people in authority representing the various political units and subdivisions of the United States; and WHEREAs, One of the greatest problems confronting the State and the nation at the present time is the furnishing of immediate employment to a large amount of idle labor released from other activities by the victorious termination of the war; and WHEREAs, The embarking upon the construction of the much-needed public improvements will furnish immediate and profitable employment to idle labor; and WHEREAs, The increase in freight rates on the heavy materials, entering largely into the construction of public works, which went into effect on June 25, 1918, was approximately one hundred per cent greater than the increase on other commodities; and WHEREAs, In the judgment of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, freight rates on materials designed for use in the construction of public works are excessive and tend unmistakably to discourage the reSumption of the construction of such enterprises, thus defeating the effort to give employment to idle labor; therefore, be it Resolved, by the Senate of the State of Illinois, the House of Representatives concurring therein, That the President of the United States, the Congress of the United States and the United States Railroad Administration be and they hereby are memorialized and respectfully but most urgently requested to take such action as will bring about a reduction in the freight tariffs governing the shipment of the materials entering largely into the construction of public works, said reduction to be not less than the advance which went into effect June 25, 1918, and to be effective at an early date; and That upon the passage of this resolution, certified copies thereof be forthwith forwarded by the Secretary of State of Illinois to the President of the United States, the presiding officers of both Houses of Congress and members from Illinois of both branches of the Congress of the United States, and the Director General of Railroads. Adopted by the Senate, February 12, 1919. Concurred in by the House of Representatives, February 13, 1919.

MEMORIAL ExFRCISEs—ABRAILAM LINCOLN.

- (Senate Joint Resolution No. 15.)

WHEREAs, Wednesday, February 12, 1919, is the birthday of Abraham Lincoln, our martyred President. Therefore, be it

Resolved, by the Senate of the State of Ilinois, the House of Representatives concurring herein, That a joint session of the two Houses be held in the Hall of the House of Representatives on Wednesday, February 12, 1919, at eleven o'clock a. m. for the purpose of memorial exercises in comThemoration of the life and character of Abraham Lincoln. Be it further

Resolved, That when the two Houses adjourn on Thursday, February * 1919, they stand adjourned until Tuesday, February 11, 1919, at ten o'clock a. m.

Adopted by the Senate, February 6, 1919.

Concurred in by the House of Representatives, February 6, 1919.

METROPOLITAN COURT COMMISSION. (House Joint Resolution No. 30.) Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the Metropolitan Court Commission is hereby created. Said com: mission shall be composed of 15 members all to be appointed by the GOVernor. One member of said commission shall be a representative of the sheriff and clerks of the Circuit, Superior and Criminal Courts of Cook County, one a representative of the clerk and bailiff of the Municipal Court of the city of Chicago, two shall be representatives of the judges of the Municipal Court of the city of Chicago, two shall be representatives of the judges of the Circuit Court of Cook County, two shall be representatives of the judges of the Superior Court of Cook County, and seven shall be practicing attorneys in Cook County. The duties and functions of the commission shall cease and the terms of office of the members thereof shall terminate upon the convening of the Fifty-second General Assembly. And be it further Resolved, That it shall be the duty of said commission to investigate the organization and operation of the courts of Cook County and the City of Chicago, and the administration of justice in said county and city, and in particular to examine and report upon the draft of the Metropolitan Court ..Bills, annexed as Exhibits A and B to the report of the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives of the 51st General Assembly, on House bills numbered 642 and 643, and to make such redraft of such bills as it, in its discretion may determine. The commission shall report the results of its investigation, together with any recommendations it may see fit to make to the Governor not later than December 1, 1920, for transmission to the Fifty-second General Assembly. And be it further Resolved, That the commission shall have power to call upon the judges and clerks of the Circuit, Superior and Criminal Courts of Cook County, the sheriff of Cook County, and the judges, clerks and bailiff of the Municipal Court of the city of Chicago for such information and assistance as it may require. It may compel the production of all relevant books and papers, summon witnesses and administer oaths, and take the testimony of all the witnesses necessary for the purposes of this resolution. Passed the House June 11, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate June 12, 1919.

North WEST TERRITORY-MEMORIAL TO SETTLERs. (House Joint Resolution No. 16.) WHEREAs, The Governor of Ohio has transmitted to the Governor and the General Assembly of this State a copy of a joint resolution passed by the 83rd General Assembly of Ohio, requesting the appointment of a coul. mittee to act with a like committee of the states comprising the original Northwest Territory, looking to the building of a memorial to the memory of the early settlers of such Northwest Territory; therefore, be it Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That there be appointed a committee of two persons from this State by the Governor thereof, such committee to act without pay, which committee shall meet a like committee from each of the states comprising the original Northwest Territory for the purpose of carrying out the foregoing plan; that such joint committee shall file a report of their recommendations with the legislatures and governors of the several states comprising the original Northwest Territory for further action by the legislatures of such states. Adopted by the House, April 8, 1919. Concurred in by the Senate, April 9, 1919.

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