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PHYSICS.

5500 Adams Electricity. 598 PP, 6 pl, 8, cf, 2, 1792. 50

1 Adams Lectures on Natural and Experimental

Philosophy: 2377 PP, 40 pl, 441 figs, 5 vols, 8, cf, 2, 1794.

Has very curious old plate, entitled "Truth Discovering

to Time, Science Instructing her Children in Natural Phi-

losophy". A remarkably fine and perfect copy of this

celebrated old work.

4.00

2 Allen Mechanics of Nature. 813 PP, 176 is, 8, 1. 2.00

3 Baile Electricity. 343 pp, 65 ill, new, 1872. 1.25

* Bartlett Acoustics and Optics. 360 PP, 110 ill, 8, hf.

sheep, 1.

.40

5 Bernoulli Mechanics. 494 pp, 121 ill, G, 2.

6 Bird (Golding, Electricity and Galvagism. 224 PP,

26 II, 2.

.35

7 Same, Natural Philosophy. 447 PP, many ill, 1, or

402 PP, 372 ill, cf, 2.

.55

8 Blake Nat. Phil. 252 Pp, 23 pl, many figs, cf, 3. .25

9 Bossut Hydrodynamique. 1124 PP, 23 pl, many figs,

2 vols, F, cf, An. IV., 1, 1796.

.80

5510 Same, Mecanique. 468 pp, 13pl, F, cf, An. X. .40

i Brown Philosophy of Physics. 541 PP, 8 new:

.60

a Cavallo Philosophy. 1049 pp, 21 large pl, 2 vols, 8,

cf, 3

.75

3 Chase Cosmical and Molecular Harmonies. 8, P,

new, 1873.

.15

4 Chevreul Colours. 430 PP, 4 pl, 1.

1.25

s Clare Motion of Fluids. 390 PP, to pl, 8 cf, 1, 1802, .75

6 Comstock Philosophy. 414 PP, 303 ill, cf, 2. .25

7 Conversations on Nat. Phil. 439 PP, 23 pl, 3. .25

Ś Cooley Nat. Phil. 329 pp. 149 ill, hf. sheep, new,.

1868

.60

9 Daniels Nat. Phil. 379 PP, 136 ill, hf. sheep, 1.

5520 Davis Manual of Magnetism. 330 PP, 184 ill, 1.

This book has a special interest for all book collectors, as

it is believed to be the first ever electro-stereotyped

throughout. It is the most complete ever published on

the subject.

1.25

1 Dickson Unity of the Physical Sciences. 95 pp,

.75

z Dolbear (Prof. A. E.) The Telephone, 128 pp, 17 ill.

An account of the phenomena of Electricity, Magnetism

and Sound, as involved in its action, with directions for

making a Speaking Telephone. New, 1877.

.60

3 Donovan Galvanism. 408 pp, 17 ill, 8, hf. cf, 1. 50

4 Draper Nat. Phil. 389 pp, 371 ill, cf, 1, 1863. .60

s Enfield Philosophy:. 324 pp, 16 pl, 241 fig, 4to, cf, 3.

Revised by Prof. S. Webber of Harvard and dedicated to

Priestly.

.50

6 Same, London, 1785.

.25

7 Same. 234 pp, 8, cf, 3.

.50

8 Ennemoser Magnetismus Natur und Religion.

568 pp, 8, hf. sheep, G, 3.

9 Farrar Cambridge N. E. Mechanics. 447 PP, 10 pl,

255 figs, 8,9.

9 Kyan Elements of Light. 144 pp, 4 pl, 8, 1 and 9,

London.

5550 Lardner Electric Telegraph. 149 PP, 100 ill, 9. .15

1. Same, Hydrostatics and Pneumatics. 281 pp, 130

ill, hf. cf 2.

.50

- Same, Steam Engine. 130 pp, ill, 1.

3 Leslie Mechanics and Hydrostatics. 519 PP, 10 pl.

180 figs, 8, 2.

4. Miller Magnetism and Electricity. 183 pp, 18 pl, 8,

hf. sheep, 2.

.6)

5 Mitchell Newtonian System of Philosophy. 163

PP, ill, 3.

6 Müller Physics and Meterology. 635 PP, 2 col, pl.

and 538 other ill, 8, new.

1.50

7 Same. 665 pp, col. pl. and 588 other ill, 8, hf, mor, fine

copy, G, new, 1872.

8 Natural Philosophy. 1679, pp, 1126 ill, 3 vols, 8,

cf, 2, $1.50, or hf. mor, 3, pub. by the Society for the

Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, London, includes Phy-

sics, Chemistry, Botany, Astronomy, &c.

9 Nicholson Philosophy. 769 PP, 25 pl, 168 figs, 2

vols, 8, cf, 2.

5560 Same,

Vol. II. 384 PP, 6 pl, 8, cf, 3.

i Norton Nat. Phil. 488 PP, 359 ill, hf. sheep, 2, 1870. .60

2 Nugent Optics. 247 PP, 103 ills, new, 1868. 1.25

3 Olmsted Nat. Phil.

592 PP, 305 ill, 8, cf, 2.

.35

4 Same. 758 pp, pl. and zio other ill, 2 vols, 8, cf, 1.

.50

5 Same. Revised by Snell. 447 pp, 379 ill, 8, 1872, 2. .75

6 Same. 296 pp, 185 ill, hf. sheep, new, 1867.

i Optics. 192 PP, 219 ill, 8, hf. cf., 2. Pub. by the Soc.

for the Diffusion of Knowledge, London.

.23

8 Parker First Lessons. 150 PP, ill, hf, sheep, 1, 150,

or P, new

.15

9 Same, Phil. 470 pp, 202 ill, hf. shp, 2, 1860 or 1861. .25

5570 Parlour Magic. 272 pp, over 100 ill, ..

i Partington Nat. and Experimental Phil. 783 pp,

4 pl. and 274 other ill, 2 vols, 8, bds, 2. Pub. at $6. 1.50

2 Paulian Dictionnaire de Physique. 2623 PP, 14 pl,

250 figs, 5 vols, 8, cf, F, 4, 1789.

3 Peck's Ganot's Physics. 504 pp, 335 ill, hf sheep, 1,

1865.

.50

4 Péclet Traité de Physique. Vol. II. 587 pp, F, 2. 30

$ Pepper Heat. 88 PP, 54 ill, new.

6 Same, Magnetism. 87 pp, 92 ill, new.

7 Same, Pneumatics and Acoustics. 98 pp, 61 ill.

8 Phanjas Physique. 3030 pp; 41 pl, 431 figs, 5 vols, cf,

.50

55.79 Same, Optics. 357 pp, ó pl, 183 fig, 8, 1, .60

1 Same, and Lovering Electricity. 343 pp, 7 pl, 187

figs, 8, 3

.60

2 Fischer (E. S.) Nat. Phil, 357 pp, 5 pl, 115 figs, 8,

Ed. by John Farrar in the Univ. of Cambridge.

New England.

.50

4 Fischer (J. G.) Physics. 476 PP, 267 ill, bds, G, 4: .25

5 Franklin (Benj.] Memoirs by his Grandson W.T.

Franklin. 2988 pp, port., autograph letter, 8 large p1, 6

vols, bound in 3,8, hf, cf, 1.

3.00

6 Same Works. 1182 pp, port, and 13 pl. of dig. of phi-

losophical apparatus, 2 vols, 8, new.

Gravesande. Introduction to Sir Isaac Newton's phi,

losophy. 972 PP, 127 large pl, many figs, 2 vols, 4to, cf,

gilt, marb. edge, 1. Very fine copy:

Grove Correlation of Physical Forces. 237 PP, 8,

London, new.

.75

5540 Guillemin [Amédée) Les Phénomènes de la

Physique. 784 pp, il finely col. pl. and 454 other ill,

imp., 8, hf, mor, F, new, Paris, 1868. A remarkally five

copy in every respect.

1 Harris Magnetism, 359 PP, 153 ill, 2 vols, London,

.75

2 Haüy Traité de Physique. 475 pp, 4 pl, Vol. I., 8, ef,

.35

3 Herschel Study of Nat. Phil. 286 pp, 1, 5cc, orhi,

mor, 2, 350, or fine gilt mor, 1.

.75

4 Hooker Nat. Phil. 346 PP, 289 ill, "hf. sheep, 1, 1870. .50

5 Hooper Rational Recreations. 559 PP, 2 vol, cf, 3. .50

6 Hunt Physics. 492 pp, col. pl, and 209 other ill., 3. .50

7 lagen-Housz Physique. Dedicated to Franklin. 1199

Pp, 6 large pl, 2 vols, hf. mor, 3, F.

8 johnston Nat. Phil. 379 PP, 320 ill, 8, hf, sheep, 2. .50

F, 1786, 3.

9 Phelps Nat. Phil. 218 pp, 131 ill, hf. sheep, new. :35

5580 Same. 306 pp, 282 ill, hf. sheep, 1, 1866.

.35

1 Phipson Phosphorescence. 225 PP, pl. and 28 other

ill, 1, 1869.

2 Playfair Nat. Phil. 682 pp, 7 pl 52 fig 2 vols 8, bds, 3. .60

3 Pouillet Physique. 1719 PP, 4) pl, many figs, 2 vols,

8, hf. mor, F, 1.

4 Same. 915 pp, 17 pl, many figs, 2 vols, 8, hf, mor, F, 3.75

5 Pratt Eccentric and Centric Force. 314 PP, 26 ill, 8,

uncut, London, 1862.

.60

6 Prescott Telegraph, 480 PP, pl, and 93 other ills, 1,

1860.

75

7 Quackenbos Nat. Phil.

450 PP, 335 ill, hf, sheep, i,

1864.

.50

8 Rodwell Nat. Phil. 182 pp 47 ill uncut London 1873. 75.

9 Rolfe and Gillet Elements. 135 PP, 95 ill, hf sheep,

.35

5590 Same, Hand-Book, 336 pp. and 218 other ill, hf.

sheep, 1, 1871.

.50

i Rood Mysteries of the Voice and Ear.

IO PP, P,

new, 1873

.25

2 Rossmann Mechanic. 472 pp, 21 pl, 224 fig, G, 5. .25

3 Schedler & Medlock Physics. 119 PP, 133 ill, new. .65

4 Snaithe and Gardiner Magnetism and Electricity.

90 pp, 30 ill, new, 1874.

.25

5 Silliman Principles of Physics. 737 PP, 722 ill, 8, 3,

1966,

75

6 Steele Fourteen Weeks in Philosophy. 34° PP,

222 ill, hf. sheep, 1, 1870.

7 South Kensiogton Museum Conference on Phy-

sica and Mechanics. Tyndall, Lockyer, Spotts-

wood, De La Rue, &c., &c. 431 pp, ill, 1877, 2. .50

8 Tate Nat. Phil. 328 pp, 615 ill, hf. sheep, new. .50

9 Tomlinson Nat. Phil. 168 PP, 37 ill, 2.

.25

56.19 Tyndall Forms of Water. 209 PP, port. and other

ill, new, 1874

1.23

I Samne, Fragments of Science 422 pp ill, 8, 3, 1871. 1.50

2 Same Light and Electricity 194 pp, ill, new, 1871. 1.00

3 Wella Nat. Phil. 452 pp, 374 ill, hf, sheep, 1.

4 Whewell Physics and Astronomy. 284 pp, 3. 50

5 Wiilits and Smit: Na:. Phil. *3.3 PP, 24 p!, ou fiy

8, cf, 2.

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.50

bds, I.

1, 1868.

2.00

2.00

new.

3, F.

2.00

American Coological Surveys.

the whole of a mountain front until it comes Hayden's ATLAS OF COLORADO.

out upon the table-land beyond. When will

our map-makers learn to use this, the only true The following article was written for the Lon- method for expressing the surface of a country? don Scientifical Periodical Nature, of September But above all, welcome are these six geologi. 12, by Professor Archibald Geikie, director of cal maps. In the previously published maps the Geological surveys of Scotland, and Profes and charts accompanying the annual reports, sor of Geology in the University of Edinburgh: only small detached areas were represented,

"In the magnificent atlas just issued by the and even from the careful descriptions of the Department of the Interior, we have the con various geologists of the staff, it was hardly possummation and crown of all the labors which sible to frame a satisfactory conception of the Dr. Hayden and his staff have carried on so geology of Oolorado as a whole. Ever since triumphantly for the last five years, and of which the marvels of its deep gorges and vividly they have already given us so much interesting painted cliffs were made known, that region has and important information in a series of annual possessed a high interest to the geologist. He reports. Before examining the work from a

has now the means of gratifying his desire for scientific point of view, no reader can refrain further knowledge. With the help of these from expressing his admiration of the style in maps and the two accompanying sheets of secwhich the Atlas has been produced by the tions, he can realize most satisfactorily every United States Government. As a specimen of great feature of Colorado geology. cartography, typography, and lithography, it is Two sheets of sections, drawn across all the altogether worthy of the highest praise. For more interesting and important portions of the beauty, and indeed sumptuousness of execution, geology, complete the vast fund of information it may be classed with those livres de luxe which, 1 given by the maps, while, that nothing may be from time to time, have been issued from the wanting to enable readers to realize what has National Imprimerie of France.

been done by the surveys and the conditions The atlas consists of two series of maps, the under which it has been accomplished, two one of a general, the other of a detailed kind. large sheets of sketches are given, which most The first series, on the scale of twelve miles to vividly represents the forms of the mountains, the inch, comprises four sheets, each embrac. plateaus, mesas and river-channels, as seen ing the whole State of Colorado and part of the from various commanding heights, neighboring territory. The first of these illus Dr. Hayden, with whose personal supervision trates the system of triangulation adopted in this great work has been accomplished, has the surveys; the third, by a simple and clear increased tenfold the obligations under which arrangement of colors, exhibits at a glance the he has laid geologists all over the world for the economic features of the whole region-the number and value of his contributions to geolagricultural land, pasturage, forests and wood ogy. He now furnishes us with new light lands, sage and bad lands, mineral tracts, and whereby to read his former researches and those the portions rising above the limit of timber of his able colleagues. May we venture to hope growth : the fourth contains a condensed and that he may find leisure to confer yet one further generalized geological map of the same terri- benefit before the progress of his survey plunges tory. Nothing can surpass the lucidity of ex him into a new whirl of works? If he could pression and artistic finish of these maps. be prevailed upon to sketch out a plan for di.

The second series, twelve in number, is on gesting the materials of his published annual the scale of four miles to one inch, and consists reports, he could doubtless find among his staff of six topographical sheets and six identical

some competent writer who, under his guidance, sheets, colored geologically. The topographcould produce a well arranged systematic guideical details, though numerous, are so selected book or text book to complete the value of the as not to neutralize each other, or mar the works of his survey. Such a book of reference broad, clear picture which the maps were de as would give a reader who has never had access signed to be. By means of contour lines 200 to the anuual reports a clear and comprehensive feet vertical distance, the surface configuration view of Colorado geology would be of great serof the whole region is depicted as in a model. vice. These remarks may be fitly closed by an We can follow the lines of the broad yalleys of expression of the warmest admiration for the the deep, narrow canons and of the hundreds liberal spirit in which the United States Governof minor tributaries which have scarred out their ment has conducted these surveys of the Tercourses on either side. Here we look down ritories, and has published their results. This upon a vast table-land, deeply trenched by costly Atlas has been distributed gratuitously stream-channels; there upon a succession of all over Europe. That this is a wise policy bold escarpments or mesas which bound the cannot be doubted. Whether actuated or not table-land and hem in the neighboring valley. by a desire to diffuse scientific information, the Huge mountain-ranges rising out of the plateaus, authorities at Washington do well to make as and are so vividly drawn that they seem to stand widely known as possible the geological strucout of the paper. Yet no shading is employed. ture and economic resources of their country, All the effects ofinequality are produced by con. They cast their bread upon the waters, avd tour lines so faithfully set down that a single the harvest comes to them in the form of eager, line may be tracked in its sinuous course along 'active emigrants from all parts of Europe.

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10, 25

PARTIAL LIST OF FOSSILS Ceramopora.

Stromatopora. now in stock in consider-nicholsoni, L. S.

iowensis, D.,

10, 30 15, 35 concentrica, U.S., 15, 25 tepuistriata, L. 8., able quantities. Man yonioensis, L. S. other species and geuera

Syringostroma.

Penta merus. on hand. In many cases

Coscinium.
columnaria, D., 75, 1.00 galeatus, U. 8.,

10, 30 from 3 to 5 specimens are plumosum, Carbon 50, 1.50

Melonites.

oblongus, U.S., given for the 5 or 10 cent

sagenella, Carb.

50, 1.00

mu ra, 2.50, 3.00 Productus. price in list. The names Fenestella.

Pentremites.

ovatus, L. S.,

10, 25 are arranged according to

banyana, Carb., 50, 1.00 pyriformis, C., 5, 25 burlingtopensis, L.S., 15, 25 S. A. Miller's work, see

prisca, L.s.,
10, 25 godoni, C.,
10, 25, aculeatus, C.,

10, 25 6351, $2.50. The great va Polypora.

Crinoidea.

elegans, C.,

5, 25 riation in price is in some halliani, Carb.

15, 1.00
Crinoid,

punctatus, C.,

10, 50 cases caused by several shumardi, Carb.,

15, 25

stems and roots, L.S., 5, 1.50 subalatus, D. specimens being on the varsoviensis, Carb., 15, 1.00

Actinocrinus.

Rensselaeria, same piece of rock, and it

nashvillae, C., 35, 50 ovoides, U. 8.,

Ptilodictya. is called one specimen. fenestrata, L. 8,

10, 25 pyriformis, C.,

Rhynchonella.
The letter or abbreviation carbonaria, Carb., 25, 1.00

stems, C.,
10, 1.00 ambigua, L. S.,

10, 25 after the name denotes the

Agaricocrinus.
Cyathophyllidae.

capax, L.S.

5, 30 geological age,

americanus, 1.00, 1.50 exiqua, L. S., Acervularia.

5, 25

wortheni, C., 35, 50 neglecta, L. S., 5, 25 PRICES IN CEXTS. profunda. Dev.,

25, 1.50
Agelacrinus.

Spirifer.
Amplexus.

cincinnatiensis, Plantæ.

25, 50 undulata, L. S., 20, 25 fragilis, Carb.,

5, 50
Dorycrinus.

grimesi, L. S. 25, 1.00 Alethopteris, Carb. 30 Caninia.

gouldl, c.

25, 50 congesta, D. Annularia.

10, 30 bilateralis, U.S.,

Forbesocrinus. longifolia, Carb, 5, 50

increbescens, U. S. 6, 30 Cyathophyllum.

shumardianus, sphenophylloides,

1.00, 1.50 kentuckiensis, C., 10, 50 dianthus, Ú.S. 25, 1.00 Glyptocrinus Arthrophycus.

leidyi, C., murchisoni (polished),

5, 30

decadactylus, L. S., harlani, L.S.

10,50 mucronatus, D. 10,1.00

Carb., 25, 2.50 dyeri, L. s., Buthotrephis.

10, 50 striatus, C., Eridophyllum.

o'nealli, L. Š., gracilis, U.S.

Streptorhynchus. 10, 1.00 rugosum, U. S., 5, 1.00 Heterocrinus. Calamites.

filitextus, L. S., 10, 25 simcoense, Dev., 25, 50 i juvenis, L. S. cannaeformis, Carb. 15, 1.50

15, 25 nutans, L. S., Lithostrotion.

5, 25

simplex, L. S., cisti, 25, 50 canadense, Carb.,

25, 80 planoconvexus, L. 8., 10, 25 5, 2.00

Poteriocrinus. nodosus,

planumbona, L. S.,

10, 25 25, 50 Petraia.

missouriensis, C., 1.00, 2.00 Cyclopteris.

vetusta, L. S., corniculum, L. S.,

5, 50 Schizocrinus. jacksoni, Dev.,

Strophomena.
5, 75
Phillipastrea,

nodosus, L. S., Fucoides, L.'s.

10,50 alternata, L. S.,

5, 30 35,50 verneuilli (2 spec. polished) Brachiopoda.

filitexta, L. S. Lepidodendron

15, 25 Dev., 50, 2.50 aculeatum, Carb,

Athyrís.

nutans, L. S., 10, 25 15, 2.00 Polydilasma.

ambiqua, C., obovatum, Carb.,

10, 25 i planoconvexa, L. S., 50, 30 10, 3,00 turbinata, U. 8., 25, 50 spiriferoides, D., 25, 30 planumbona, L. S., Lepidostrobus, Carb, 10, 25

10, 30 Streptelasma.

subtilita, C.,

10, 25 rhomboidalis, L. S. 10, 30 Neuropteris.

corniculum, L. S.,

0,50

Atrypa. cyclopteroides, Carb., 10, 25

squamula, L. S., 15, 25 Zaphrentis.

increbescens, L. S., 5, 25 sulcata, L. S., gigantea, Carb.,

15, 25 15, 75 bilateralis, L. S., 15, 50 altilis, L.S, hirsuta, Carb.,

16, 25 subtenta, L. S., 15, 30 5, 50 dalii, U.S.,

15, 50

unicorta, L. S., Palaeophycus.

10, 15 tenuistriata, L. S.,

15, 25 gigantea, Dev., 25, 1.00

aspera, D.,

10, 25

Terebratula. Irregularis, L. S., 5, 50 prolifica, Dev., 15,50 cuboides D., 10, 30 | harlani, Cret., Pecopteris,

10, 50 | rafinesquii, Dev., 10, 1.00 globuliformis, D., abbreviata, Carb.,

carnea, Cret.,

10, 30 5, 50! spinulifera, Carb., 5, 50 inesacostalis, D., 5, 30 arborescens, Carb., 5,50 (quartz pseudo),

hastata, c.

10, 30 10, 25

modesta, D., villosa, Carb.,

5,15 impressa, Jur., 5, 50 Favositidæ.

5, 30

nodostriata, U.S., 10, 25 striata, Cret., unita, Carb.,

10, 30 5, 50 Alveolites, (polished), reticularis, D., Scolithus.

5,30 Terebratulina.

Carb., 40, 1.50 Calceola. linearis, L. S.,

plicata, Cret.,

10, 25 50 Chetetes.

sandalina, D., Sigillaria,

Zygospira. approximatus, L. S., 5, 25 Chonetes. attenuata, Carb.,

modesta, L. S., 10, 1.50 attritus, L. S., 5, 25 mesoloba, C.,

5, 15 laevigata, Carb.,

Conchifera. 10, 1.00 calicula, L. 8., 25, 50 logani, D.,

10, 1.00

Ambonychia. obovata, Carb., 25,75 dalii, L. s.,

5, 25
Dictyonema.

radiata, L. S., occulata, Carb., 5, 2.00 fletcheri, L. S.,

5, 50 10, 25 gracilis, L. S. 5, 25

Anodontopsis. pachyderma, Carb., 10, 1.00 frondosus, L. S., reniformis, Carb., . 25, 1.00

Leptaena.

milleri, L. S., gracilis, L. S.,

20, 35 sericea, L. S.

10, 25 unionoides, L. S., sp., Carb.,

30, 50 19, 1.00 amesi, L. S.,

alternata, L. 8.,

25, 30

Avicula.
Sphenophyllum, 25,75 lycoperdon, L. S., 30, 1.00 tenuistrata, L. S.,
Sphenopteris.

25, 30 pectiniformis, L. S., 20, 30 mammulatus, L. S., 10, 50 Lingula. decipiens, Carb.,

trentonensis, L. S., 10, 30 newberryi, L.S., 25, 35 antiqua, L. S., 25, 30 chemungensis, D., Sphirophyton.

10,50 ortoni, L. S., 20, 30 planumbona, L. S., 10, 25 demissa, L. S., cauda-gallí, Dev.,

15, 50 25, 50 pulchellus, L. S.,

5, 50
Meristina.

emacerata, U. S.,
Stigmaria.
subpulchellus, L. S., 5, 30 maria, U.S.

10, 25

Cucullaea. ficoides, Carb., 15, 2.00 Favistella.

Meristella.

vulgaris, Cret, Trigonocarpon, Carb., 10, 25 stellata, L. S.,

sulcata, U.S., 10, 25

Edmondia. Populites, Cret.,

Favosites.

Orbicula.

subtruncata, L. S., 5, 30 Angiosperms. alveolaris, U. S., 5, 50 minuta, D.,

5. 30 (stems of), Cret.,

Exogyra.
10, 50 favosus, U. 8.,

5,50
Orthis.

arietina, Cret., Rhizopoda.

10, 75 goldfussi, D,

5, 50 biforata, L. S., 5, 50 costata, Cret., Eozoon.

10,50 gothlandicus, U. 8., 5, 50

var, lynx, L. S., 5, 50 virgula, Jur., canadense, Laur., 50, 1.25 niagarensis, U. S.,

25, 50 5, 50

var.acutilirata, Receptaculites, L. 8., 25, 50

Grammysia.
Monticulipora.

L. S.

10,40 cingulata L. S., Siphonia. papillata, U. S., 5,50 dentata, L. S., 5, 30 elliptica, D.,

30, 50 pyriformis, Cret., 50 Stellipora.

bellarugosa, L. S., 15, 25 ventricosa, C., Forameniferae.

10,50 antheloidea, L. S. 5, 50 cmacerata, L. S.,

Gryphaea. (polished), Carb., 75, 1.50 Halysitidae,

jugosa, L. S.,

15, 25

convexa, Jur., Bryozoa. Halysites.

25, 30

occidentalis, L. S., Alecto.

5, 25 incurva, Cret.,

35, 50 catcnulatus, U.S., 5, 75 sinuata, L. 8., 5, 25 pitcheri, Cret., auloporoides, L. S.,

6, 15 Protarea.

subquadrata, L. S., 5, 30 vomer, Cret., Archimedes.

10, 25 vetusta, L. 8., 25, 59 plicatella, L. S.,

5, 25

Inoceramus. wortheni, Carb.,

25, 2.00
Aulopora.

inultisecta, L. S., 10, 25 problematicus, Cret., 5, 1.00 Callopora. arachnoidea, L. 8., 10,50 testudinaria, L. S.,

Microdon. punctata, Carb.,

50, 1.00
cornuta, D.,
15, 25 | tricenaria. L. S., 5, 30 | bellistriata, D.,

25,50

10, 25

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Modiola.

Gonioceras. concentrica, O.,

anceps,

50, 1.00 Modiolopsis.

Wirines. modiolaris, D.,

Scolithus, Myalina.

linearis, perattenuata, C.,

verticalis, Orthonota.

20, 30

Serpulites. parallela, Ostrea.

jamesi, falcata, Cret.,

Trilonites. larva, Cret.,

25, 00 Asaphus. marshii, Jur.,

10, 1.00 (lsotelus) gigas, 25, 1.00 Pecten.

tuberculatus,

75, 1.00 quadricostatus, Cret., 16, 50 Calymene. Pinna.

senaria,

5, 1.50 Missouriensis, C.,

25, 1.00

Crypheus. Pterinea,

callitites,

75, 1.00 demissa,

Trinucleus. Ungulina.

concentrica, suborbicularis, D.,

Besides these we have on Bellerophon. bilobatus, L. S.,

hand sets of Tertiary Gasvar. corrugatus L. s., 10, 25 teropods from T. A. Concarbonarius, C.,

rad's private collection at 5, 15

the following rates : newberryi, D., 25, 50 Bucania.

20 species,

1.00 bidorsata, L. S.,

10, 15 sulcatina, L. S.

70

10.00 Cyclonema.

Echinoidea. bilix, L. S.,

Clypeus. Cyclora.

hugi, Jur., minuta, L. S.,

Echinus. Cyrtolites.

ciclaris (spines), C., ornatus, L. S., 19, 25 clypcaster, C., compressus, L. S.,

Encrinite. Holopea.

(arms), C., paludiniformis, L. E., 20, 30 Encrinus. Macrocheilus.

moniliformis, C., fusiformis, C.,

5, 25

Orthopsis. Murchisonia.

milliaris, (ret., bicincta, L. S.,

Polypiers. bellicincta, L. S.,

Cret., subfusiformis, L.S., 15, 330 Spatangus. Nerinaea.

Cret., goodhalli, Jur.,

Madrepora. Platyostoma.

mississippiensis, Es., 10, 30 temiata, L. S.,

30

Cephalopoda. Pleurotomaria.

Ammonites. tabulata, L. S.,

bucklandi, Jur.

25, 1.50 lenticularis, L.S.,

conradi, (ret. umbilicata, L. S.,

10, 50 5, 30 sulcomaginata, L. S., 10, 25 inantalli, Grel.,

cordiformis. Jur., 1.00, 1.50

50, 1.00

placenta, Cret. 0.5, 50 LOWER SILURIAX. rhotomareusis, Cret., 15, 50

varians, ('ret., 75, 1.00 Besides the many Lower Baculites. Silurian fossils in the pre-compressas, Cret.,

0.5 50 preceding list, the follow- ovatus, Cret., ing was in type before the Belemnitella. plan was changed :

mucronata, Cret., Pteropoda.

Ceratites. Tentaculites.

nodosus, Trias., 50, 1.00 minutus,

50, 75

Goniatites. fissarella,

15, 1.00 marcellensis, Der., stelingensis.

Hainites. Conularia.

attenuatus, Cret., 5, 10 trentonensis,

Nautilus. Cephalopoda.

pseu lo-elegans, Cret., 2.50, Orthoceras.

3.00 multicaineratum,

Pleurot.

25, 1.25 doseri,

15, 1.00 aronata, ('ret., arcuoliratum,

30, 1.00

Scaphites. tercii orme,

50, 1.00 larvelormis, Cret., 75, 1.0 ce receptuu, 15, 73 Descrisus, Cret..

30,0 junceuro,

15, 25 i reniricosus, Cret., sbareuium,

Turrilites.

50, 75 byrnesi,

tus, ret.,

3.3.10 veriebolls,

25, 50 2.dosus, ( ret., undlowi riatum,

35, 50)

Trilo riles. sirigatum,

Calymene. crinolica, 10, 30 viagırensi :, T.S.,

5, 25

Fossils. Recommended by the Natural Science committee of the Society for the Encouragement of Studies at Home. These are put up in three grades, according to size and quality, at $3.50, 85.00 and $10.00: 1 Primordial, Fucoides, Buthotrephis gracilis, Herki

mer county, N. Y. 2 Lower Silurian, Coral, Streptelasma corniculum, Or

ford, Ohio. 3 Trenton, Orthoceras, Orthoceras duseri, Waynesville,

Ohio.
Orthis, Orthis lynx, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Trilobite, Calymene senaria, Warren co., O.

Crinoid, Crinoid stems, Oxford, Ohio. 7

Brachiopod, Strophomena alternata, Cincin

nati, o. 8 Upper Silurian, Coral, Favosites niagarensis, Erie co.,

New York.
Brachiopod, Rychonella capax, Oxford, O.

Coral, Halysites catenulata, Ills. 11 Deronian, Coral, Favosites goldfussi, Logansport, Ind. 12

Brachiopod, Atrypa aspera, Moscow, N. Y.
Cap! pod, Gonatites marcellensis, Spice-

land, Ind. 14 Carboniferous, Coral, Lithostrotion canadense, War

Crinoids, Pentremites pyriformis, Ili.

Sigillaria, Sigillaria oculata, Pittston, Pa. 17

Fern, Pecopteris unita, Mazon Creek, 111. 18 Mesozoic Belemnitella, Belemnitella mucronata, N. J. 19 Tertiary, Gasteropod, Terebra divisurum, Vicksburg,

Miss. 20 Shark's teeth,

S. C. I have put up a large number of the Minerals and Rocks recommended by the Society. Their lists are as follows, and I will furnish the sets to any one ordering at the following rates: Minerals-17x22 inches, $2.00 24x342, $5.00. Rocks-144x27/2, $2.00; 27.39%, $3,50. The above sizes are only average, some run under and

Rocks. Elementary list of Rocks, advised by the Society: 1 Limestone, St. Louis, Mo. 2 Limstone, showing fossils, Warren Co., Ohio. 3 Chalk, Dover Cliffs, Eng. 4 Clouded Limestone Marble, Vermont. 5 Crystalline Limestone, Reading, Pa. 6 Oolite, Humbolt, Iowa. 7 Grey Sandstone, Rutherford Co., N. C. 8 Conglomerate, Pittston, Pa. 9 Sbale, Montgomery Co., Pa. 10 Slate, Slatington, Þa. 11 Granite, coarse, Maine. 12 Granite, fine, Maine. 13 Porphyritic Granite, St. Cloud, Minn. 14 Syenite, Philadelphia, Pa. 15 Gneiss, Philadelphia, Pa. 16 Mica Schist, Fairmount Park, Pa. 17 Trap, Montgomery Co., Pa. 18 Trachyte. 19 Lava, Sandwich Islands. 20 Diatomaceous Earth; Richmond, Va.

Minerals. List of Minerals recommended by the Society, for Elementary use. 1 Quartz crystallized, Ilot Springs, Ark, 2 Agate, Agate Harbor, L. S. 3 Smoky Quartz, Pike's Peak, Col. 4 Jasper, Bijou Basin, Col. 5 Hone stone, Tot Springs, Ark. 6 Flint, Dover Cliils, Eng. 7 Feldspar (Orthoclase), Pike's Peak, Col. 8 Mica (Muscovite), Chester Co., Pa. 9 Hornblende, Frankford, Pa. 10 Pyroxene, Reading, Pa. 11 Garnet, Brunswick, Me. 12 Tourmaline, Bristol, Conn. 13 Calcite, El Paso Co., Col. 14 Dolomite, St. Louis, Mo. 15 Gypsum, Indian Territory. 16 Pyrite, Virginia. 17 Magnetite (Lodestone) Magne Cove, Ark. 18 Hematite (Specular Iron), N. Y. Mine, Mich. 19 Limonite, Trigg Co., Ky. 20 Siderite, Spathic Ore, Roxbury, Mass. 21 Chalcopyrite (Yellow Copper Ore) Colorado. 22 Galena, Washington Co., Mo. 23 Graphite (Black Lead), Colfax Co., New Mexico.

20, 30 10,50

10,50

5, 50

5, 25

25, 65

35,50

25, 1.0)

25, 73

10, 30

2), 1.20 cincinnatiense,

Dainanites. Cyrtoceras.

calliteles, Der macrostomum,

Homalonowis. Endocerco.

dekayi, Der,

27, 1.00 proteiforme,

5, 1.09

Phacops. Ormoceros.

bufo, Der..

16, 1.00 tenuifiliuia,

vas. i7n3, 11:., 27, 76

25, 50

23, 1.50

35, 50

27, 50

[graphic]

LEISURE HOURNE Bulletin

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No. 3:

March. 1879.

"No rest this throbbing slave may ask, In sending stamps for sums under $1, please Forever quivering o'er his task,

send only lc. stamps. While far and wide a crimson jet Leaps forth to fill the woven net,

Thomas Meehan's great work on "The Na

tive Flowers and Ferns of the U.S.," is being Which in unnumber'd crossing tides, pushed forward with far more vigor than any The flood of burning life divides, Then, kindling each decaying part,

other botanical work of the present time. The Creeps back to find the throbbing heart."

well known reputation of Prof. Meehan, who has just been re-elected Vice-President of the

Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, The various collections of plants that were is a sufficient guarantee of the scientific accuadvertised in the January number, especially the racy of the work. No lover of ferns or flowers ferns,etc., by a well known New England Bot- should be without it. anist, and the Sandwich Island Ferns, have been The study of Natural History is the most enselling much better than was expected. The for- nobling pursuit to which the human mind can mer at $3.50 per hundred, are about one-third give its attention. We can but feel a deep regular prices, and include many rare species, pity for those minds that are dead to harmonies and the latter are quite rare and much less like those that the following fact is an example than the regular price. A set of 25 species, of. A bone was presented to the great comover forty specimens for $2. I also advertise

parative 'Anatomist, Prof., Owen, and after a fine set of woods of New England Trees, fifty carefully examining it, he pronounced it to be specimens, $2.50. This is far below the ordin

the leg bone of a new species, and of a hitherto ary rates. Size of each specimen, 5xl}x} in. unknown wingless type. The time was short, thick. Every specimen accompanied by a before complete skeletons arrived from New printed label, giving both scientific and com. Zealand, and soon live birds, one of which mon name and descriptive list.

looking as much like a hairy animal as a bird, I offer a set of 575 species of Southern I have at my exhibit in the Permanent Exhiplants, collected by a first-class botanist. They bition. Leidy, Cope, Gray, and other eminent have given the highest satisfaction to all who Naturalists, are daily giving us similar exam. have purchased them. Prof. J. C. Martindale, ples of the results of a due appreciation of of Camden, says of this collection: “It has Nature's undeviating laws of perfect harmony. given me the highest satisfaction, I consider it

It is this that makes the discovery of Shortia one of the best collections I ever bought." Salicifolia of so much interest. See January THERE never would have been any milk in

number, page 3. the cocoanut, if some of our dairymen had ESPECIAL attention is called to the low price had the construction of it.

at which I sell systematic collections. Besides

the 18 collections sent to Williams College, UNIVERSITY OF Ohio,

over 90 have been sold during the past month.

I have sent very many collections to Europe, Columbus, O., Oct., 23, 1878.

and yesterday sent one to Scutari, Turkey. A Prof. Foote :—The books came to hand all few weeks before I sent a box to Genl. Gadocorrect, and you have my thanks for prompt- lin and Count Kotzubui, of Russia. Scientific ness. The books are a bargain. Yours, very men are cosmopolitians. Franklin received truly,

the thanks of the British Government for the Pror. S. W. Robinson. conduct he gave Capt. Cook around the world.

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