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This compilation is an idea of my own, being conceived during an effort to qualify myself to prepare labels in compliance with the law, for my customers.

I have been a diligent reader of literature on this subject ever since the passage of the act. Some extra duties asked of me, by my house prompted me to issue this volume. I dare say, few, if any, have made the careful and constant study of the Pure Food and Drug laws in every phase of them as I have done.

My thorough knowledge of the drug business and long experience as a salesman for a large Pill Box and Label firm, coupled with the extensive study I have made upon this subject, causes me to feel that I am fully qualified to produce a book giving in every detail correct information for making labels in compliance with the Pure Drug laws.

E. M. WELLS,
Graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy.
A member of the committee revising the first National Formulary.

Box 734, Dallas, Texas.
Price, $3.00, postpaid.

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Label Requirements

9-11

Label Construction by Illustration......

.12-20

A list of many articles under the ban of the Law.

.24-26

Rules for Estimating Proportions Meeting Label Requirements.

.26-28

Form of Application for a Serial Number.

.22-23

List of Legal Names under

the Food and Drugs Act, with Formula as Required to be on the

Label, and the Dose. Also Trade Names that are Admissable

Under the Law

32-199

Many Miscellaneous Articles.

200-201

Harmony Shown Between the National Law and a Number of State

Laws

.202-228

HOW TO MAKE LABELS

IN COMPLIANCE WITH

The Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906

How to make labels in compliance with the Pure Drug Law is a question that greatly concerns every maker of labels as well as the users of them.

Labels are made up according to judgment, based upon knowledge of the Pure Food and Drug Laws and the standard works. Congress passed an Act making it an offense to manufacture, ship interstate, sell or have in possession any drug or food misbranded or adulterated, known as the "Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906."

"Section 6. That the term “Drug" as used in this Act, shall include all medicines and preparations recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary for internal or external use, and any substance or mixture of substances, intended to be used for the cure, mitigation or prevention of disease of either man or other animals.”

“The term "Food" as used herein, shall include all articles used for food, drink, confectionery, or condiment by man or other animals, whether simple, mixed or compounded.”

"Section 7. That the purpose of this Act and Article shall be deemed to be adulterated."

In case of drugs :

"First. If, when a drug is sold under or by a name recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary, it differs from the standard of strength, quality or purity as determined by the test laid down in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary official at the time of investigation.”

Provided, That no drug defined in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary, shall be deemed to be adulterated under this provision, if the standard strength, quality, or purity be plainly stated upon the bottle, box or other container thereof, although the standard may differ from that determined by the test laid down in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary.”

Second. If it's strength or purity fall below the proposed standard or quality under which it is sold.

In the case of confectionery.

“If it contains terra alba, barytes, talc, chrome yellow, or other mineral substances or poisonous color or flavor, or other ingredient deleterious or detrimental to health, or any vinous malt, or spiritous liquor, or compound, or narcotic drug.

"In the case of food :

“First. If any substance has been mixed and packed with it so as to reduce or lower or injuriously affect its quality or strength.

"Second. If any substance has been substituted wholly or in part for the article.

“Third. If any valuable constituent of the article has been wholly or in part abstracted.

"Fourth. If it be mixed, colored, powdered, coated, or stained in a manner whereby damage or inferiority is concealed.

“Fifth. If it contain any added poisonous or other added deleterious ingredient which may render such article injurious to health: Provided, That when in the preparation of food products for shipment they are preserved by any external application applied in such manner that the preservative is necessarily removed mechanically, or by maceration in water, or otherwise, and directions for the removal of said preservative shall be printed on the covering or the package, the provisions of this Act shall be construed as applying only when said products are ready for consumption.

“Sixth. If it consists in whole or in part of a filthy, decomposed, or putrid animal or vegetable substance, or any portion of an animal unfit for food, whether manufactured or not, or if it is the product of a diseased animal, or one that has died otherwise than by slaughter.

“Section 8. That the term “Misbranded,” as used herein, shall apply to all drugs, or articles of food, or articles which enter into the composition of food, the package or label of which shall bear any statement, design, or device regarding such article or the ingredients or substances contained herein which shall be false or misleading in any particular, and to any food or drug product which is falsely branded as to State, Territory, or country in which it is manufactured or produced.

“That for the purpose of this Act an article shall also be deemed

"In the case of drugs:

"First. If it be an imitation of or offered for sale under the name of another article.

"Second. If the contents of the package as originally put up shall have been removed, in whole or in part, and other contents shall have been placed in such package, or if the package fails to bear a statement on the label of the quantity or proportion of any alcohol, morphine, opium, cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta, eucaine, chloroform, cannabis indica, chloral hydrate, or acetanilide, or any derivative or preparation of any such substances contained therein.

"In the case of food :

"First. If it be an imitation of or offered for sale under the distinctive name of another article.

“Second. If it be labeled or branded so as to deceive or mislead the purchaser, or purport to be a foreign product when not so, or if the contents of the package as originally put up shall have been removed in whole or in part and other contents shall have been placed in such package, or if it fail to bear a statement on the label of the quantity or proportion of any morphine, opium, cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta, eucaine, chloroform, cannabis indica, chloral hydrate, or ace: tanilide, or any derivative or preparation of any such substances contained therein.

“Third. If in package form, and the contents are stated in terms of weight or measure, they are not plainly and correctly stated on the outside of the package.

'Fourth. If the package containing it or its label shall bear any statement, design, or device regarding the ingredients or the substances contained therein, which statement, design, or device shall be false or misleading in any particular: Provided, That an article of food which does not contain any added poisonous or deleterius ingredients shall not be deemed to be adulterated or misbranded in the following cases :

“First. In the case of articles labeled, branded, or tagged so as to plainly indicate that they are compounds, imitations, or blends, and the word "compound," "imitation," or "blend," as the case may be, is plainly stated on the package in which it is offered for sale: Provided : That the term blend as used herein shall be construed to mean a mixture of like substances, not excluding harmless coloring or flavoring ingredients used for the purpose of coloring and flavoring only: And provided further, That nothing in this Act shall be construed as re

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