Anecdotes of Some Distinguished Persons, Chiefly of the Present and Two Preceding Centuries, Volum 2

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T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies, 1796

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Side 68 - A fiery soul, which, working out its way, Fretted the pigmy body to decay, And o'er-informed the tenement of clay...
Side 55 - It raiseth admiration, as signifying a nimble sagacity of apprehension, a special felicity of invention, a vivacity of spirit, and reach of wit more than vulgar; it seeming to argue a rare quickness of parts, that one can fetch in remote conceits applicable; a notable skill, that he can dexterously accommodate them to the purpose before him; together with a lively briskness of humour, not apt to damp those sportful flashes of imagination.
Side 375 - ... them in a superior manner did not always preserve, when they delineated individual nature. His portraits remind the spectator of the invention of history, and the amenity of landscape.
Side 316 - Marriot, it began to rain, and he called to his servant for his cloak. The servant not bringing it immediately, he Called for it again. The servant, being embarrassed with the straps and buckles, did not...
Side 318 - In the first place, I have only five guineas in my pocket; and in the second, they are heartily at your service.
Side 375 - Sir Joshua Reynolds was, on very many accounts, one of the most memorable men of his time. He was the first Englishman who added the praise of the elegant arts to the other glories of his country. In taste, in grace, in facility, in happy invention, and in the richness and harmony of colouring, he was equal to the great masters of the renowned ages.
Side 53 - Sometimes it lieth in pat allusion to a known story, or in seasonable application of a trivial saying, or in forging an apposite tale; sometimes it playeth in words and phrases, taking advantage from the ambiguity of their...
Side 336 - Vanbrugh , and is a good example of his heavy though imposing style (*Lie heavy on him, Earth, for he Laid many a heavy load on thee"), with a Corinthian portico in the centre and two projecting wings.
Side 88 - A king is a thing men have made for their own sakes, for quietness sake : just as in a family one man is appointed to buy the meat ; if every man should buy, or if there were many buyers, they would never agree ; one would buy what the other liked not, or what the other had bought before ; so there would be a confusion.

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