The Gallery of Engravings, Volum 1

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George Newenham Wright
Fisher, Son & Company, 1844
 

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Side 34 - He faded, and so calm and meek, So softly worn, so sweetly weak, So tearless, yet so tender — kind, And grieved for those he left behind; With all the while a cheek whose bloom Was as a mockery of the tomb, Whose tints as gently sunk away As a departing rainbow's ray...
Side 34 - Oh God ! it is a fearful thing To see the human soul take wing In any shape, in any mood.
Side 13 - Dispensatory," the Complete Justice, and a Book of Farriery. In the corner, by the fire-side, stood a large wooden two-armed chair with a cushion ; and within the chimney corner were a couple of seats. Here, at Christmas, he entertained his tenants assembled round a glowing fire made of the roots of trees, and other great logs, and told and heard the traditionary tales of the village respecting ghosts and witches, till fear made them afraid to move. In the mean time the jorum of ale was in continual...
Side 47 - My pulse as yours doth temperately keep time, And makes as healthful music. It is not madness That I have uttered : bring me to the test, And I the matter will re-word ; which madness Would gambol from.
Side 102 - t appointed to consider what Measures ought to be adopted with regard to the NATIVE INHABITANTS of Countries where BRITISH SETTLEMENTS are made, and to the neighbouring Tribes, in order to secure to them the due observance of Justice and the protection of their Rights ; to promote the spread of Civilization among them, and to lead them to the peaceful and voluntary reception of the Christian Religion...
Side 48 - And here you will forgive me, perhaps, if I presume to state what appears to me to be the conduct proper to be observed by a physician in withholding, or making his patient acquainted with, his opinion of the probable issue of a malady manifesting mortal symptoms. I own...
Side 34 - I've seen the sick and ghastly bed Of Sin delirious with its dread: But these were horrors — this was woe Unmix'd with such — but sure and slow. He faded, and so calm and meek, So softly worn, so sweetly weak, So tearless, yet so tender — kind, And grieved for those he left behind; With all the while a cheek whose bloom Was as a mockery of the tomb...
Side 65 - At what a sailor suffers ; fancy too, Delusive most where warmest wishes are, Would oft anticipate his glad return, And dream of transports she was not to know. She heard the doleful tidings of his death — And never smiled again ! and now she roams The dreary waste ; there spends the livelong day, And there, unless when charity forbids, The livelong night.
Side 9 - There is no instance of a man before Gibbons who gave to wood the loose and airy lightness of flowers, and chained together the various productions of the elements with a free disorder natural to each species.
Side 14 - On the Eve of Christmas-Day they carry MiSLETOE to the high Altar of the Cathedral and proclaim a public and universal liberty, pardon, and freedom to all sorts of inferior and even wicked people at the gates of the city, towards the four quarters of Heaven?

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