Commentaries on the Conflict of Laws: Foreign and Domestic, in Regard to Contracts, Rights, and Remedies, and Especially in Regard to Marriages, Divorces, Wills, Successions, and Judgments

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Little, Brown, 1846 - 1068 sider
 

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Side 881 - ... all actions of debt grounded upon any lending or contract, without specialty, and all actions of debt for arrearages of rent, shall be commenced and sued within six years next after the cause of such action or suit, and not after.
Side 19 - In a strict and legal seN.se that is properly the domicil of a person where he has his true, fixed, permanent home and principal establishment, and to which, whenever he is absent, he has the intention of returning (animus rercrtcndi) .u [Italics supplied.] Mr.
Side 93 - English law, applicable to such a case. But the only principle applicable to such a case by the law of England, is, that the validity of Miss Gordon's marriage rights must be tried by reference to the law of the country where, if they exist at all, they had their origin. Having furnished this principle, the law of England withdraws altogether, and leaves the legal question to the exclusive judgment of the law of Scotland.
Side 117 - All men are born free and equal, and have certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.
Side 13 - The true foundation on which the administration of international law must rest is that the rules which are to govern are those which arise from mutual interest and utility, from a sense of the inconveniences which, would result from a contrary doctrine, and from a sort of moral necessity to do justice in order that justice may be done to us in return.
Side xxxvi - Natural allegiance is therefore a debt of gratitude, which cannot be forfeited, cancelled, or altered, by any change of time, place, or circumstance, nor by any thing but the united concurrence of the legislature.
Side 132 - The comity thus extended to other nations is no impeachment of sovereignty. It is the voluntary act of the nation by which it is offered, and is inadmissible when contrary to its policy, or prejudicial to its interests.
Side 15 - In the silence of any positive rule, affirming, or denying, or restraining the operation of foreign laws, courts of justice presume the tacit adoption of them by their own government, unless they are repugnant to its policy, or prejudicial to its interests.
Side 376 - ... contracts are to be construed and Interpreted according to the laws of the state In which they are made, unless, from their tenor, It Is perceived that they were entered into with a view to the laws of some other state.
Side 123 - no person held to service or labor in one state under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be due.

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