The Life of Major-General Sir Thomas Munro, Bart. and K.C.B., Late Governor of Madras: With Extracts from His Correspondence and Private Papers, Volum 3

Forside
Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1830
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 388 - When we reflect how much the character of nations has always been influenced by that of governments, and that some, once the most cultivated, have sunk into barbarism, while others, formerly the rudest, have attained the highest point of...
Side 381 - ... of settling every thing permanently ; to do every thing in a hurry, and in consequence wrong; and, in our zeal for permanency, to put the remedy out of our reach. The ruling vice of our government is innovation ; and its innovation has been so little guided by a knowledge of the people, that though made after what was thought by us to be mature discussion, must appear to them as little better than the result of mere caprice. We have, in our anxiety to make every thing as English as possible,...
Side 388 - We should look upon India not as a temporary possession, but as one which is to be maintained permanently, until the natives shall in some future age have abandoned most of their superstitions and prejudices, and become sufficiently enlightened to frame a regular Government for themselves, and to conduct and preserve it.
Side 382 - It is time that we should learn, that neither the face of a country, its property, nor its society, are things that can be suddenly improved by any contrivance of ours, though they may be greatly injured by what we mean for their good...
Side 386 - There is one great question to which we should look in all our arrangements; What is to be their final result on the character of the people ? Is it to be raised, or is it to be lowered ? Are we to be satisfied with merely securing our power and protecting the inhabitants, leaving them to sink gradually in character lower than at present, or are we to endeavour to raise their character, and to render them worthy of filling higher...
Side 83 - I have myself so vulgar a taste, that " I see more beauty in a plain dress, than in one tricked out " with the most elegant pattern, that ever fashionable painter feigned. This unhappy depravity of taste has been occasioned, perhaps, by my having been so long accustomed to view the Brahmin women, who are in this country, both the first in rank and in personal charms almost always arrayed in nothing but...
Side 384 - Nations always take a part with their government, whether free or despotic, against foreigners. Against an invasion of foreigners, the national character is always engaged, and in such a cause the people often contend as strenuously in the defence of a despotic as of a free government. It is not the arbitrary power of a national sovereign, but subjugation to a foreign one, that destroys national character, and extinguishes national spirit.
Side 383 - ... secure from violence; they cannot be wantonly punished, or their property seized, by persons in power; and their taxation is, on the whole, lighter. But, on the other hand, they have no share in making laws for themselves, little in administering them, except in very subordinate offices ; they can rise to no high station, civil or military ; they are everywhere regarded as an inferior race, and often rather as vassals or servants than as the ancient owners and masters of the country.
Side 315 - On the state of the country and the condition of the people ', dated December 31, 1824, and I suggest this be read in view of the present position.
Side 360 - We profess to seek their improvement, but propose means the most adverse to success. The advocates of improvement do not seem to have perceived the great springs on which it depends : they propose to place no confidence in the natives, to give them no authority, and to exclude them from office as much as possible ; but they are ardent in their zeal for enlightening them by the general diffusion of knowledge. No...