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the steps leading through PRESCOTT-GATE, to the Lower-Town. The house formerly had an uninterrupted view in front as far as the wall of the Seminary, the buildings which now intervene being of modern date. It is remarkable in the local history of the city, for a representation in stone over the entrance from Buade Street, of a dog gnawing a bone, with an inscription in French. This having been always gilt, has acquired the name of Le Chien d'Or ; and the following explanation of its origin has been handed down to the present day :

Mr. PHILIBERT, who resided in this house, was a Merchant of high distinction during the time when M. Begon, whom we have mentioned above, was Intendant of New France. The latter had formerly been a merchant of Bordeaux; and came to Quebec in 1712. Differences occurred between him and M. PHILIBERT, over whom superior interest and power gave M. BEGON every advantage. Unable to obtain redress for his injuries, real or supposed, M, Philibert bitterly, although covertly, expressed his sentiments under the image of the Chien d'Or, to which he added the following inscription in old French :

JE SVIS VN CHIEN QVI RONGE L'os.
EN LE RONGEANT JE PREND MON REPOS.
VN TEMS VIENDRA QVI NEST PAS VENV
QVE JE MORDRAY QVI MAVRA MORDV.

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M. Begon determined on revenge, and M. PhiliBERT, descending the Lower Town hill, received the sword of M. De R a French Officer of the garrison, through his body. The perpetrator of this murder made his escape and left the Province; but the crime was too atrocious to be forgiven. The bro

ther of M. PHILIBERT came to Quebec to settle the estate, with a full determination of taking personal vengeance on the assassin. So determined was he to execute this part of his mission, that having ascertained that M. De R - had gone to the East Indies, he pursued him thither. They met in a street of Pondicherry-engaged on the spot-and the assassin fell mortally wounded under ihe sword of the avenger.

The Chien d'Or remains to perpetuate this tale of bloodshed and retribution.

MONTCALM HOUSE.

A little to the west of HOPE-GATE, within the Fortifications, and immediately adjoining the termination of the garden wall of the Hotel Dieu, looking towards the north-east, stands the building once inhabited by the brave Marquis DE MONTCALM. It is now divided into three private residences. The entrance appears originally to have been through a court yard in the rear; and as the walls of the building next to the fortifications are very thick, and the foundations massive, it is very probable that it was once intended for defence on the side looking to the basin.

It is at present no otherwise remarkable than as having been the residence of the French General, whose fame the battle of the Plains of Abraham has perpetuated in the same scroll with that of his successful and lamented antagonist.

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THE MARINE HOSPITAL.

This building, of which, as it will appear when finished, a view is given on the other side, is situated not far from the General Hospital, on the bank of the Little River St. Charles ; and nearly opposite to the spot where Jacques Cartier first wintered in 1535.

In 1831, it was resolved to erect an Hospital, out of the city, for the reception of sailors and persons coming by sea who might be afflicted with disease. Mr. H. M. Blaiklock, Architect and Civil Engineer, was appointed to prepare plans and estimates under the Commissioners, Messrs. Clouet, Cannon and Dr. Morrin, which plans were approved by the GoverNOR-IN-Chief. The estimated cost was £23,000, and the expenditure up to the present time has been £15,000, defrayed by different votes of the Legislature.

The MARINE HOSPITAL, when completed, will contain upon the ground or first story, Catholic and Protestant Chapels, with apartments for the officiating Ministers --Housekeeper's and Steward's apartments and store-rooms :- Nurses' apartments :--two large kitchens :-Wards for sixty patients, with Baths and all necessary conveniences. The principal story will contain a large entrance hall, approached by a double flight of stone steps on the exterior :à Museum, forty-five feet in length :apartments for the Medical Officers :-examining rooms :-operating theatres, and accommodations for sixty eight patients. The third story will have apartments for the chief Nurses, and wards for one hundred and forty patients. The upper story is

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