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On this rests the Sarcophagus, seven feet three inches high. The obelisk measures forty-two feet eight inches, and the apex two feet one inch, making in the whole an altitude of sixty-five feet from the ground. The dimensions of the obelisk at the base are six feet, by four feet eight inches, taper-ing conically to the apex, where the sides are diminished to three feet two inches, by two feet five inches. This classical ornament of our city was finished, with the exception of the inscription, on the 8th September; and its completion was witnessed by the zealous patron of the work, the EARL OF DALHousie. On the morning of that day, not to be forgotten by the numerous friends of that noble Lord, being the day of his departure from the Province, the Government of which he had conscientiously administered for eight years, His LORDSHIP, accompanied by his successor in the Administration of the Government, Lientenant General Sir JAMES KEMPT, G. C. B., and attended by the Staff, several military officers, and a party of ladies and gentlemen of the city and vicinity, proceeded to the walk in front of the Governor's garden, to witness the completion of the Monument. A few minutes after eight o'clock, the apex, or cap-stone, was placed upon the summit; and the ceremony of tapping it with the mallet was performed by his nephew and Aide de Camp, Captain Fox MAULE, 79th Highlanders, as proxy for the noble Earl, who ascended to the top of the obelisk for that purpose. Thus was this chaste memorial to WOLFE and MONTCALM, through the exertions of Mr. John Phillips, the builder, completed during the summer of 1828, to the great gratification of His ExcELLENCY, who had all along expressed the

strongest wish for its completion before his departure from Quebec.

A prize Medal was offered, by the Committee for the erection of the Monument, to the person who should furnish the most appropriate inscription. The author of 6 MEN AND MANNERS IN America," travelling in CANADA, has thought fit to object to the inscription being in the Latin language. He has also found fault with the Monument itself, as copied too closely from one in Italy. To this latter objection, it has already been replied, when it was stated that the Monument is a combination of separate beauties contained in distinct works of art, here made to produce the happiest effect, and possessing the most perfectly classical union. It is, in fact, no copy of any particular Monument, either as to composition, or geometrical proportion. In answer to the former objection, it is sufficient to observe that to have adopted an inscription in either French or English might have been dissatisfactory to one portion of the inhabitants; and that by selecting the Latin,-a language common to every civilised nation, to all scholars, and almost universally adopted on similar occasions,—all objections seemed to be obviated. strangers who have visited this Monument, most have expressed decided approbation on both the points, objected to by Mr. Hamilton. Indeed the truly ATtic elegance and simple grandeur of this obelisk, together with the chivalrous generosity and ingenuous discrimination of its erection to the immortal memory of both of those heroes, WOLFE and MONTCALM, deserve the grateful commemoration of every liberal mind.

Of the many

The Monument presents the following inscription on the Sarcophagus, or Cenotaph of the heroes. On the front, in large letters :

MORTEM. VIRTVS. COMMVNEM.

FAMAM. HISTORIA.
MONVMENTVM. POSTERITAS.

DEDIT.

This inscription was honored with the prize Medal, and was written by J. CHARLTON Fisher, L. L. D. On the rear is the following, altered from that which was inscribed upon the Plate deposited with the foundation stone :

HUJUSCE
MONUMENTI IN VIRORUM ILLUSTRIUM MEMORIAM,

WOLFE ET MONTCALM,

FUNDAMENTUM P. C.
GEORGIUS COMES DE DALHOUSIE ;-
IN SEPTENTRIONALIS AMERICÆ PARTIBUS

AD BRITANNOS PERTINENTIBUS

SUMMAM RERUM ADMINISTRANS;
OPUS PER MULTOS ANNOS PRÆTERMISSUM,

QUID DUCI EGREGIO CONVENIENTIUS ?
AUCTORITATE PROMOVENS, EXEMPLO STIMULANS,

MUNIFICENTIA FOVENS.

A. S. MDCCCXXVII.
GEORGIO IV. BRITANNIARUM REGE.

On the north side of the Sarcophagus, looking to the country, is the simple word “ MONTCALM,” in large characters ; and on the opposite side, that towards the River by which he reached the scene of his glorious victory and death, is inscribed the name of " Wolfe.”

The following lines were written on the occasion of laying the first stone of the Monument: the Latin tetrastick by the author of the prize incription, and the English ode by an officer of the 66th Regiment :

WOLFE-MONTCALM.

HAVD ACIES EADEM-AST EADEM FATALIS ARENA

COMMVYIS VIRTVS- ATQVE PERENNE DECVS-
VICTRIX CAVSA PAREM MERITIS ET VICTA FAVOREM

VINDICAT-ÆTERNUM VIVERE FAMA DEDIT.

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Shall thousand Cenotaphs proclaim
On battle fields each glorious name,

And on this hallowed spot-
These smiling Banks his valor gain’d,
Those frowning Heights his blood hath stain'd,

Is only WOLFE's forgot ?

Deeply each British heart hath mourn'd
His dust nor trophied, nor inurn'd,

Unnoticed and unknown-
Be thing the stain to wash away,
Be THiNE thy Country's debt to pay,

And for the wrong atone.

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And thou, brave Veteran, on whose breast
WOLFE, dirg'd by Victory, sank to rest,

Come consecrate the Pile !
Virtue and Valor have agreed,
The Christian Priests shall bless the deed,

And HEAVEN above shall smile.

Having replied to the somewhat illiberal censure of the author of " Men and Manners in America," we must now advert, as connected with the too hasty impressions and frequently erroneous conclusions of travellers, to a statement contained in a recent publication, intituled, “ Transatlantic Sketches,by Captain ALEXANDER, 42d Royal Highlanders, F. R.G. S. and M. R. A. S. It is known to all residents in QUEBEC, that at the corner of St. John and Palace Streets, there is a public house, yclept “ General Wolfe's Hotel ;” and that in a niche at the angle of the wall, there has long been a diminutive statue, of painted wood, said to be of that hero. Captain ALEXANDER thus gravely introduces it to his readers : “ I promenaded about the city, and had pointed out to me the various objects of interest, particularly the small statue of WOLFE, in a red coat, cocked hat and knee breeches, set up in a corner of a street, to mark the spot to which the conqueror of Quebec penetrated as a spy previous to his victory !” It is certainly true that this statue was set up in honor of WOLPE, after the conquest, by an individual of more patriotism than taste; but the tale of his having penetrated into St. John Street as a spy is in itself so very improbable, and is besides so completely negatived by the well known facts of his attack upon the city, that it is really surprising how a traveller of any reputation could have been so far imposed upon as to record a story which his own historical information ought to have warned him to reject.

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