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OFFICERS PRESENT ; RANK AND FILE, &c. AT THE BATTLE OF 13th SEPT. 1759,

15th Amherst's

415 51 0 28th Bragg's

1 0 1 5 9 81 0 35th Otway's.....

0

5 11 811
43d Kennedy's.

0 6 5 4| 1
47th Lascelles'

0 1 0 5 8. 81 0
48th Webb's..

이 4 16 7| 1
58th Anstruthers'. 0 1 1 417 61 0

Monckton's 1 0 0 2 6 61 0 60th

Lawrence's S01 0 4 11 8 0
78th Fraser's.

0 0 0 7 12 7 1
22d Louisbourg 2
40th Companies of 0 1 0 2 8 0 1
45th Grenadiers...

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Total. 31 6 5|48|109|67|| 5 2 4. 1 (259 102 4215

4826 One Major General ; Three Brigadiers, one Quarter Master General ; one Aid Quarter Master

General ; one Adjutant General; four Majors of Brigade; two Aids de Camp.

Total

(58th

48th
47th
43d.
35th
28th
15th.

Regiments.

60th
78th .........
Louis. Gren. ... 0 1 0 0

3d Bat.
2d Bat.

oo | Captains.

KILLED.

cs

All Ranks, Killed, Wounded and Misssing—Six hundred and Sixty-Four.

1' 6 1 31 47 14 2611 251 41506

3 7 0 131

WOUNDED.

LIST OF THE KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING ON THE 13th SEPT. 1759.

1 80

Lieutenants
Ensigns.
Serjeants.
Rank and

File.
Captains.
Lieutenants
Ensigns.

Serjeants.
| Drummers.
Rank and
File.
Rank and File

Missing

Bombar-
One Wounded.

diers.
| Two Killed.

| Gunners.
| Five Wounded.

| Matrosses. | Killed. Maj. Genl. 1

| Wounded. Brigadier. I
- Wounded. Q. M. Genl. |

| Wounded. Adjt. Genl.
| Wounded. Maj. Brig. 1
I Wounded. Aides de C.
| Wounded. Engineers.

5

1

ARTILLERY

STAFF.

STRENGTH of the French Army at the Battle of Quebec,

13th September, 1759.

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THE NAVAL FORCE of the French consisted of the following

vessels :

KING's FRIGATES.

L'Atalante...
La Pomone...... ............

Guns. ....60 ....32

MERCHANT VESSELS.
Le Machault..................

..24
Le Seneclere......

.24 Le Duc de Fronsac.......................

...24 Le Bienfaisant.....

... 24 The lovely Nancy.......

....24 La Chezine.....

22

CHAPTER THE SIXTEENTH.

In order to do ample justice to the interesting subject of which we now treat, and satisfied that nothing which tends to illustrate the glorious campaign of 1759, will be read with indifference at the present day, we devote this chapter to a selection from the various anecdotes and reminiscences, which have been handed down, relative to the chief actors in the eventful crisis which added another wreath to the national fame, and a new Province to the British Empire.

MEMORABILIA OF 1759.

ANECDOTE OF MR. PITT, AFTERWARDS EARL OF CHATHAM, The following anecdote of Mr. Pitt, the Minister who selected WOLFE as eminently fit for the command of the expedition against Quebec, was communicated by his under Secretary of State, Mr. Wood, to a friend of his, and is a striking proof of his honesty and energy of purpose.

Mr. Pitt sought out merit wherever he could find it ; and knowing that he could not give General Wolfe a sufficient number of troops, he told him that he would make it up to him as well as he could, by giving him the appointment of all his officers. Wolfe sent in his list, in which was the name of an officer, Lieutenant Colonel Guy Carleton, who had unfortunately made himself obnoxious to the then King, by some un. guarded expression, concerning the Hanover troops, and which had, by some officious person, been repeated to His Majesty.

Lord Ligonier, then Commander-in-Chief of all His Majesty's land forces, took in the list to the King, who, as he expected, made objections to a particular name, and refused to sign the commission. Mr. Pitt sent Lord Ligonier into the closet a second time, with no better success. His Lordship refused to go in a third time at Mr. Pitt's suggestion. He was, however, told his place would be vacant if he did not; and that, on presencing the name to the sovereign, for the third time, he should tell him the peculiar situation of the state of the expedition ; and that in order to make any General completely responsible for his conduct he should be made as much as possible inexcusable if he failed ; and that, in consequence, whatever an officer, entrusted with any service of contidence, requested, should, if possible, be complied with. Lord Ligonier went in a third time, and told bis Sovereign, what he was directed to say. The good sense of this so completely disarmed his resentment, that he signed the particular commission as he was requested.

GENERAL WOLFE.

General JAMES WOLFE was born January 2nd, 1727, in the Parish of Westerham, Kent. The County of York also claimed the honor of his birth, and there was a dispute on the subject. His father was Lieutenant General EDWARD WOLFE, who died Colonel-in-Chief of the 8th Regiment, on the 27th March, in the same year with his illustrious son.

He commanded that Regiment at the battle of Culloden, in 1745. He was the second son—the eldest, Edward, a youth of great promise, also entered the army, and died young in Germany. Another brother, younger than James, is mentioned as baring been at Louisbourg.

In the mismanaged expedition against Rochford, under Sir John Mordaunt, in 1757, WOLFE was Quarter Master General with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the army. When the General's conduct came under examination, he was called upon as an evidence by both parties. The candor, precision, and knowledge of his profession, with which he delivered it, gained him esteem ; and though only thirty years of age, his military talents in conversation appeared with such lustre as recommended him to the patronage of the Ministry, and of His Majesty George II. His gallant conduct at the capture of LOUISBOURG completely established his fame, and led to his appointment to the command of the expedition against QUEBEC.

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