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NOXIOUS, adj. Lat. norius. Hurt- fire, in 1131, 1152, and 1228. There are manuNor'1oCSNESS, n. s. ful; baneful; mischieve factories here of linen, muslins and caps, and

Nox'iously, udv. ous ; unwholesome : large tan-yards; and a trade is carried on in these hepce criminal; guilty; unfavorable: the sub- articles, and in corn, leather, &c. This is the stantive and adverb correspond.

native place of the celebrated Calvin. It is The writers of politics have warned us of the eighteen miles north-east of Compiègne, and noriousness of this doctrine to all civil governments, thirty-one S.S. W. of St. Quentin. which the Christian religion is very far from disturb- NOZʻLE, n. s. From Nose, which see. The ing.

Hammond.

nose; the snout; the end. Those who are norious in the eyes of the law are justly punished by them to whom the execution of

It is nothing but a paultry old sconce, with the the law is committed. Bramhall against Hobbes.

nozle broke off. Arbuthnot and Pope's Mart. Scrib. Preparation and correction is not only by addi- NUBIA, a country of Africa, situated between tion of other bodies, but separation of norious parts the cataract of the Nile, at Syene or Assouan, Abysfrom their own.

Browne.

sinia, and the Red Sea. It sometimes is considered Kill noxious creatures, where 'tis sin to save :

as including Sennaar, but this seems of sufficient This only just prerogative we have. Dryden.

Norious seeds of the disease are contained in a importance as a separate state to be treated dissmaller quantity in the blood.

Blackmore.

tinctly, see SENNAAR : the whole is a part of the See pale Orion sheds unwholesome dews,

ancient Ethiopia. Nubia consists almost entirely Arise, the pines a norious shade diffuse ;

of rocks and sandy deserts. Along the banks of Sharp Boreas blows, and nature feels decay,

the Nile it is indeed occasionally fertile, and diTime conquers all, and we must all obey. Pope. vided into a great number of petty principalities

Too frequent an appearance in places of much re- or states, governed by absolute chiefs, called mesort is norious to spintual promotions. Swift. leks or cachefs. But the whole population of

NOY (William), attorney-general under Charles this territory, which is about 500 miles long, but I., was the son of William Noy of St. Burian, very narrow, is estimated by Mr. Burckhardt at zent. In 1593 he was sent to Exeter College, only 100,000 individuals. It is divided into thence to Lincoln's Inn, where he became emi- two parts, called Wady Kenous, and Wady el nent in juridical knowledge. He was twice elected Nouba, sometimes also called Sayd : the inhabiM.P. for Helston, and in both parliaments zea- tants of these two divisions speaking different lously opposed king James's attempts to increase languages, although their manners and customs the royal prerogative. In 1625 he was elected appear similar. The city of Dongola, to which M.P. for St. Ives, and in that and the following the Mamelukes retired on their being driven parliament continued to shine as a popular patriot; by the pacha of Egypt from that country, is the but in 1631 the court converted him by appointing largest place along this line. Its neighbourhood is him attorney-general; after which he pleaded for particularly famous for the breed of horses, one the extension of the royal prerogative as zealously of which is said to be valued on the spot at ten as he had formerly opposed it. He wrote several or twelve slaves. But Dehr is regarded as the treatises; particularly, 1. The Complete Lawyer; capital of Nubia. 2. Arguments of Law, and Speeches; 3. The The geography of the whole valley of the Nile Principal Grounds and Maxims of the Laws of south of Philae is very defective. Its geology England, 4to. He died at Tunbridge Wells, in and mineral products, the probable elevation of August 1634.

the stream of the Nile, and its natural history, NOYON, an ancient and pretty post town, even as to the plants and animals, &c., have and chief place of a canton in the arrondissement been wholly neglected until the journey of Burckof Compiegne, department of the Oise, France, hardt, who himself did not penetrate farther into containing 5750 inhabitants. Situated at the foot this region than about 20° N. lat., and who and on the side of a hill, this town is surrounded has by no means exhausted these topics. We with a number of richly cultivated gardens, pre- shall give, however, the particulars that have senting an appearance of the greatest abundance been furnished, and add a few extracts from the and riches. It is very well built and very airy, observations of recent travellers. adorned with public fountains and crossed by Beyond Egypt the 'eastern bank of the Nile is the Vorse, which bere separates into two branches, said to be better watered and adapted to cultiand falls into the Oise at the distance of about a vation than the western; although almost all the mile from the town. Noyon was, for some time, ruins of this region are on the opposite bank. the capital of the emperor Charlemagne, who was It is thought, therefore, that this last must have crowned here. Hugh Capet was elected king been formerly more fertile, but has been reduced bere in 987. Three times it was devastated by to its present state by the continual encroachVol. XVI.-Part. I.

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ment of the immense moving sands of the west. cloth and linen cap form the dress of the rich The territory is irrigated here not by the over- The women wrap themselves in black woollen flowing of the Nile, but by sakies, or wheels, gowns; but boys and girls go about naked. In constructed for the purpose of raising the waters ascending the Nile, the dress of all classes beof the river; the government receiving for the comes more and more scanty. use of each wheel so many fat sheep, and mea- Although firearms are comparatively rare, the sures of grain, called dhourra. This forms the Nubian is seldom unarmed; the first purchase great object of Nubian culture; it is the botanical a boy makes is a short crooked knife, tied over holcus arundinaceus. The people grind it by the elbow, and ready to be drawn on the slightest strewing the grain upon a large stone, and rub- quarrel. The Kenou and Nouba tribes are albing a smaller one over it. If the bread is to be most always engaged in bloody quarrels ; and, of superior quality, the dhourra is well washed and when death ensues, the family of the deceased may then dried in. the sun. This pains, however, they demand the price of blood, or retaliate on the do not often take. It is placed in an earthen jar, brother, son, or near relative, so that a whole and left to ferment from twenty-four to thirty-six family is often thus obliged to fly. Great numhours, when it acquires a sourish taste; and the bers of the lower orders repair to Cairo to act as substance being merely poured upon an iron porters. plate, or flat stone, placed over the fire, in a few The natives of Dar el Mahass, the inost southminutes it is baked into cakes resembling the erly district, differ considerably from the other Abyssinian liff. They are brought to table hot, Nubian tribes. They are perfectly black, and in a wooden bowl, with onion sauce, broth, and their lips like those of the negro, but not the milk, or butter. Cakes of a thinner kind, and nose or cheek. The king of Mahass is described well toasted, are prepared for the caravans, by Burckhardt as a mean-looking man, attended and will keep for some months. They have also, by half a dozen naked slaves, armed with shields after the dhourra, a crop of barley here, French and lances. This is the nearest part of the black beans, lentils, or water-melons. Tobacco is cul- country whence slave traders arrive at Cairo. tivated every where, and is a chief luxury, either Their houses are constructed of mats made of smoked or sucked rather than chewed. Animal palm leaves, fastened to high poles, the extrefood is scarce. The liquors (in which they in- mities of which go through the roof. dulge) are palm wine, a spirit distilled from Nubia is principally visited for its splendid dates, and, above all, bouza, a fermented liquor remains of antiquity, rivalling the most colossal made from the dhourra. No fruit is cultivated monuments of Thebes or Hindostan. The most except palms for dates.

magnificent is that of Ipsambul, still in a state The climate of Nubia, though intensely hot in of almost complete preservation, and sculpsummer, is very dry and salubrious. The plague, tured out of the living rock. It has at least ten which is so common near the lower parts of the colossal figures attached; six in front, and four Nile, never reaching beyond the second cataract. that Mr. Burckhardt found buried in the sand, at So healthy was this country during Mr. Burck- about the distance of 200 yards. One of them, hardt's visit, that in a journey of five weeks he from the dimensions of the shoulder, could not, did not observe a single person laboring under if uncovered, be less than sixty-five or seventy disease. The small-pox, however, makes occa- feet in height. They were conjectured to have sionally great havoc here. In general the inha- been constructed to serve as ornaments to an bitants are of full stature, well made, and have immense temple : some of their countenances fine features. The women

possess sweet

were beautifully expressive. countenances and pleasing manners. They are Another extensive part Nubia extends from also said to be modest and reserved : but, if the the Nile to the Red Sea; and here modem trawealthiest Nubian happen to have a daughter vellers have only penetrated in the line taken by whom the chief demands in marriage, the father the caravan to Sennaar. It is said to contain cannot venture to refuse him: and the chiefs not a single permanent abode, but is a complete have thus wives in every considerable village. desert, interspersed with wadys or valleys, afThe Nubian is extremely jealous of his wife's fording some few trees and shrubs, with a few honor, and on the slightest suspicion of her in- wells or rills. Burckhardt, after passing through fidelity, we are told, would carry her in the night the deserts of Suez and Sinai, did not think, to the side of the river, lay open her breast by a cut however, this quite so dreary. Unlike the other with bis knife, and throw her into the water, as he African deserts, it is covered with hills. says, “to be food for the crocodiles.' Their At the southern extremity of this tract is Berhouses are either of mud or loose stones; the ber, consisting of four large villages, employed in last being usually planted two together, one for a brisk trade between Egypt, Arabia, and Central the male, and the other for the female members Africa. The people are said to be a handsome of the family. The mud huts are roofed with race, of a dark red-brown color. The men are dhourra stalks or palm leaves. The utensils of taller than the Egyptians, and much stronger; the family generally consist of about half a dozen the nose is often perfectly Grecian here, and the coarse earthen jars, a few earthen plates, two cheek bones not prominent. “We are Arabs, stones for grinding the dhourra, and a hatchet. not negroes, they say; and they are careful to The domestic employment of the females consists maintain the purity of their race.

Few men in weaving coarse woollen and cotton cloth for have more than one wife; but every one who can shirts and mantles, and mats of date leaves ; afford it keeps a slave or mistress, called his they also make the small drinking bowls and companion. Few traders pass through Berber plaies used for the dhourra bread. A woollen without taking one of them, were it only for a

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week or two; and a general dissoluteness of examined, and no doubt remained of its having manners is the natural effect. Every thing dis- been a celebrated sanctuary of pure Egyptian creditable to humanity is said to be found in the architecture. Mr. Legh thinks it probably of an character of this race; but treachery and avidity earlier date than those in Egypt; the walls being predominate. Quarrels are frequent and violent, built in a ruder style, and the hieroglyphics, especially at their drinking parties; and they though bold, of inferior execution ; but the stacommonly end in bloodshed. The chief scenes tues, he adds, and the sphinxes would bear a of these disorders are the bouza huts, kept by closer examination. He was greatly struck with women of infamous character, by whom the the high state of preservation of the stone and liquor is manufactured: no one ventures there outward walls of these venerable ruins, as comwithout taking his sword with him; and various pared with the state of those below the catapersons of distinction who have entered have never

No reasonable allowance of difference been known to return. A common trick is to en- of date,' he says, will explain this; and we tice strangers to one of these women, who next day must seek for the cause in the mild unalterable is owned as a relation, and vengeance or presents climate between the tropics.

The corroding depanded for the dishonor done to the family. hand of time has no effect upon them, but they

Another part of the miscellaneous territory is are abandoned to the desert, and many of them the road to Souakin, through the populous and will in a few years entirely disappear. fertile district of Taka.

About fourteen miles further brought them to The chief trade of Berber, and of Nubia gene- Dehr, the capital of Nubia, to wait on Hassan rally, consists in slaves imported from the inte- cacheff, the chief of the Barabras. At this moTor of Africa, and conveyed northwards into ment the people were celebrating the festival of Egypt, or across the Red Sea by Souakin and the cacheff's marriage, which our travellers were Jidda. The annual number is estimated at 5000, rather surprised to hear them call (in lingua of whom about 2500 are for Arabia, 1500 for Franca) a fantasia. They rode through scattered Egypt, and 1000 for Dongola and the Bedouins plantations of date trees, among which were inof the mountains. Few of these unhappy beings terspersed a number of mud huts, till they are above the age of fifteen; they are chiefly reached the house of the chief, distinguished ked in the east as domestics. The most va.ued only by being built of brick, and consisting of are between eleven and fifteen ; if males they two stories. The natives, many of whom were sell for fifteen or sixteen dollars; if females, for drunk, were greatly astonished at the sudden aptwenty-five or twenty-six. While they remain pearance of the strangers ; but offered them no inwithin the negro territories they are treated with civility. They brought them paste, with boiled great indulgence; but when once in the desert, goat's flesh swimming in butter.

After waiting where they have no chance of escape, the treat- about four hours, the cacheff made his appearment is entirely changed.

ance, attended by five or six officers, and a numMr. T. Legh, M. P., is the earliest of the ber of Negro guards; he was a young man, about modern band of travellers whose contributions six feet high, of a handsome person, half drunk to the illustration of this region are before us. with araki, a spirit distilled from dates. He He penetrated further along the banks of the asked them boisterously what they wanted, and Nile into the ancient Ethiopia than any pre- why they came to Dehr? This was but a disceding traveller. At Siala it was deemed expe- couraging reception from a man who had 300 dient to wait on the Douab cacheff, who was armed negroes at his elbow, and at least 3000 in encamped about a mile and a half from the the district, ready to execute any of his comriver, forming a sort of advanced guard of the mands. On retiring, he ordered his secretary, Nubians : they found the men in wigwams; who spoke Arabic, to conduct them to a lodging the women and children apart in tents; the for the night; this was a mud hut of two apartwhole body about 400; the horses and camels ments, but without a roof; it was, however, next feeding around them. The cacheff received them to that of the cacheff, the best in all Dehr. kindly; made no sort of objection to their pro- Early in the morning the secretary called upon ceeding up the river, and told them he would them, and hinted that his master expected a presend an express to Dehr, to inform Hassan sent, and that one of their swords would be acsacheff of their intended visit to his capital. ceptable. On waiting on the Cacheff, they He offered them milk, flour and butter, invited offered him a watch, of which he declined the them to eat out of the same bowl with him, the acceptance, as they were unable to comprehend strongest mark of hospitality and friendship, and, its use. Perceiving that any facilities for the in return for some coffee and tobacco, presented further progress of their journey depended on the them with a sheep.

sacrifice of one of their swords, Mr. Legh preAt Dondour was a small temple containing sented him with a fine Damascus blade worth at Dothing more remarkable than the character least 500 piastres: the effect was instantaneous : 4 + 2 upon the fragments showing it to have his eyes sparkled with pleasure, and his lips utbeen the possession of some early Christians. The tered nothing but friendship. lle enquired after. Weather began now to be exceedingly sultry; the our author's harem—if he had left it at the cathermometer in the cabin was at 86°; in the outer taract, “ meaning,' says Mr. Legh, “ as I underair 96®, and in the sand 126o; būt it was a great stood, to give me a female slave to wait upon my relief to find the inhabitants every where peaceably wife.' He afterwards made him a present of a disposed ; they brought the travellers dates, milk, negro boy, and granted permission for them to and whatever their scanty means enabled them proceed to Ibrim, offering horses and dromedato afford. The temple of Sibhoi was minutely ries, or any thing else that could be of service.

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ment of the immense moving sands of the west. cloth and linen cap form the dress of the rich
The territory is irrigated here not by the over- The women wrap themselves in black woollen
flowing of the Nile, but by sakies, or wheels, gowns; but boys and girls go about naked. In
constructed for the purpose of raising the waters ascending the Nile, the dress of all classes be-
of the river; the government receiving for the comes more and more scanty.
use of each wheel so many fat sheep, and mea- Although fire-arms are comparatively rare, the
sures of grain, called dhourra. This forms the Nubian is seldom unarmed; the first purchase
great object of Nubian culture; it is the botanical a boy makes is a short crooked knife, tied over
holcus arundinaceus. The people grind it by the elbow, and ready to be drawn on the slightest
strewing the grain upon a large stone, and rub- quarrel. The Kenou and Nouba tribes are al-
bing a smaller one over it. If the bread is to be most always engaged in bloody quarrels; and,
of superior quality, the dhourra is well washed and when death ensues, the family of the deceased may
then dried in. the sun. This pains, however, they demand the price of blood, or retaliate on the
do not often take. It is placed in an earthen jar, brother, son, or near relative, so that a whole
and left to ferment from twenty-four to thirty-six family is often thus obliged to fly. Great num-
hours, when it acquires a sourish taste; and the bers of the lower orders repair to Cairo to act as
substance being merely poured upon an iron porters.
plate, or fat stone, placed over the fire, in a few The natives of Dar el Mahass, the most south-
minutes it is baked into cakes resembling the erly district, differ considerably from the other
Abyssinian liff. They are brought to table hot, Nubian tribes. They are perfectly black, and
in a wooden bowl, with onion sauce, broth, and their lips like those of the negro, but not the
milk, or butter. Cakes of a thinner kind, and nose or cheek. The king of Mahass is described
well toasted, are prepared for the caravans, by Burckhardt as a mean-looking man, attended
and will keep for some months. They have also, by half a dozen naked slaves, armed with shields
after the dhourra, a crop of barley here, French and lances. This is the nearest part of the black
beans, lentils, or water-melons. Tobacco is cul- country whence slave traders arrive at Cairo.
tivated every where, and is a chief luxury, either Their houses are constructed of mats made of
smoked or sucked rather than chewed. Animal palm leaves, fastened to high poles, the extre-
food is scarce. 'The liquors (in which they in- mities of which go through the roof.
dulge) are palm wine, a spirit distilled from Nubia is principally visited for its splendid
dates, and, above all, bouza, a fermented liquor remains of antiquity, rivalling the most colossal
made from the dhourra. No fruit is cultivated monuments of Thebes or Hindostan. The most
except palms for dates.

magnificent is that of Ipsambul, still in a state The climate of Nubia, though intensely hot in of almost complete preservation, and sculpsummer, is very dry and salubrious. The plague, tured out of the living rock. It has at least ten which is so common near the lower parts of the colossal figures attached; six in front, and four Nile, never reaching beyond the second cataract. that Mr. Burckhardt found buried in the sand, at So healthy was this country during Mr. Burck- about the distance of 200 yards. One of them, hardt's visit, that in a journey of five weeks he from the dimensions of the shoulder, could not, did not observe a single person laboring under if uncovered, be less than sixty-five or seventy disease. The small-pox, however, makes occa- feet in height. They were conjectured to have sionally great havoc here. In general the inha- been constructed to serve as ornaments to an . bitants are of full stature, well made, and have immense temple: some of their countenances fine features. The women

were beautifully expressive. countenances and pleasing manners. They are Another extensive part of Nubia extends from also said to be modest and reserved: but, if the the Nile to the Red Sea ; and here modem trawealthiest Nubian happen to have a daughter vellers have only penetrated in the line taken by whom the chief demands in marriage, the father the caravan to Sennaar. It is said to contain cannot venture to refuse him: and the chiefs not a single permanent abode, but is a complete have thus wives in every considerable village. desert, interspersed with wadys or valleys, afThe Nubian is extremely jealous of his wife's fording some few trees and shrubs, with a few honor, and on the slightest suspicion of her in- wells or rills. Burckhardt, after passing through fidelity, we are told, would carry her in the night the deserts of Suez and Sinai, did not think, to the side of the river, lay open her breast by a cut however, this quite so dreary. Unlike the other with his knife, and throw her into the water, as he African deserts, it is covered with hills. says, “to be food for the crocodiles. Their At the southern extremity of this tract is Berhouses are either of mud or loose stones; the ber, consisting of four large villages, employed in last being usually planted two together, one for a brisk trade between Egypt, Arabia, and Central the male, and the other for the female members Africa. The people are said to be a handsome of the family. The mud huts are roofed with race, of a dark red-brown color. The men are dhourra stalks or palm leaves. The utensils of taller than the Egyptians, and much stronger; the family generally consist of about half a dozen the nose is often perfectly Grecian here, and the coarse earthen jars, a few earthen plates, two cheek bones not prominent. “We are Arabs, stones for grinding the dhourra, and a hatchet. not negroes, they say ; and they are careful to The domestic employment of the females consists maintain the purity of their race. Few men in weaving coarse woollen and cotton cloth for have more than one wife; but every one who can shirts and mantles, and mats of date leaves; afford it keeps a slave or mistress, called his they also make the small drinking bowls and companion. Few traders pass through Berber plaies used for the dhourra bread. A woollen without taking one of them, were it only for a

possess sweet

week or two; and a general dissoluteness of examined, and no doubt remained of its having manders is the natural effect. Every thing dis- been a celebrated sanctuary of pure Egyptian creditable to humanity is said to be found in the architecture. Mr. Legh thinks it probably of an character of this race; but treachery and avidity earlier date than those in Egypt; the walls being predominate. Quarrels are frequent and violent, built in a ruder style, and the hieroglyphics, especially at their drinking parties; and they though bold, of inferior execution ; but the stacommonly end in bloodshed. The chief scenes tues, he adds, and the sphinxes would bear a of these disorders are the bouza huts, kept by closer examination. He was greatly struck with women of infamous character, by whom the the high state of preservation of the stone and liquor is manufactured: no one ventures there outward walls of these venerable ruins, as comwithout taking his sword with him; and various pared with the state of those below the catapersons of distinction who have entered have never racts. • No reasonable allowance of difference been known to return. A common trick is to en- of date,' he says, “ will explain this; and we tice strangers to one of these women, who next day must seek for the cause in the mild unalterable is owned as a relation, and vengeance or presents climate between the tropics. The corroding demanded for the dishonor done to the family. hand of time has no effect upon them, but they

Another part of the miscellaneous territory is are abandoned to the desert, and many of them the road to Souakin, through the populous and will in a few years entirely disappear. fertile district of Taka.

About fourteen miles further brought them to The chief trade of Berber, and of Nubia gene- Dehr, the capital of Nubia, to wait on Hassan rally, consists in slaves imported from the inte- cacheff, the chief of the Barabras. At this monor of Africa, and conveyed northwards into ment the people were celebrating the festival of Egypt, or across the Red Sea by Souakin and the cacheff's marriage, which our travellers were Jidda. The annual number is estimated at 5000, rather surprised to hear them call (in lingua of whom about 2500 are for Arabia, 1500 for Franca) a fantasia. They rode through scattered Egypt, and 1000 for Dongola and the Bedouins plantations of date trees, among which were inof the mountains. Few of these unhappy beings terspersed a number of mud huts, till they are above the age of fifteen; they are chiefly reached the house of the chief, distinguished used in the east as domestics. The most taued only by being built of brick, and consisting of are between eleven and fifteen; if males they two stories. The natives, many of whom were sell for fifteen or sixteen dollars ; if females, for drunk, were greatly astonished at the sudden aptwenty-five or twenty-six. While they remain pearance of the strangers; but offered them no inwithin the negro territories they are treated with civility. They brought them paste, with boiled great indulgence; but when once in the desert, goat’s flesh swimming in butter.

After waiting where they have no chance of escape, the treat- about four hours, the cacheff made his appearment is entirely changed.

ance, attended by five or six officers, and a numMr. T. Legh, M. P., is the earliest of the ber of Negro guards; he was a young man, about modem band of travellers whose contributions six feet high, of a handsome person, half drunk to the illustration of this region are before us. with araki, a spirit distilled from dates.

He He penetrated further along the banks of the asked them boisterously what they wanted, and Nile into the ancient Ethiopia than any pre- why they came to Dehr ? This was but a diseeding traveller. At Siala it was deemed expe- couraging reception froin a man who had 300 dient to wait on the Douab cacheff, who was armed negroes at his elbow, and at least 3000 in Encamped about a mile and a half from the the district, ready to execute any of his comriver, forming a sort of advanced guard of the mands. On retiring, he ordered his secretary, Nubians : they found the men in wigwams; who spoke Arabic, to conduct them to a lodging the women and children apart in tents; the for the night; this was a mud hut of two apartwhole body about 400; the horses and camels ments, but without a roof; it was, however, next feeding around them. The cacheff received them to that of the cacheff, the best in all Dehr. kindly; made no sort of objection to their pro- Early in the morning the secretary called upon ceeding up the river, and told them he would them, and hinted that his master expected a preund an express to Dehr, to inform Hassan sent, and that one of their swords would be acracheff of their intended visit to his capital. ceptable. On waiting on the Cacheff, they He offered them milk, flour and butter, invited offered him a watch, of which he declined the thern to eat out of the same bowl with him, the acceptance, as they were unable to comprehend strongest mark of hospitality and friendship, and, its use. Perceiving that any facilities for the in return for some coffee and tobacco, presented further progress of their journey depended on the them with a sheep.

sacrifice of one of their swords, Mr. Legh preAt Dondour was a small temple containing sented him with a fine Damascus blade worth at Dothing more remarkable than the character least 500 piastres : the effect was instantaneous : A + Q upon the fragments showing it to have his eyes sparkled with pleasure, and his lips utbeen the possession of some early Christians. The tered nothing but friendship: lle enquired after. weather began now to be exceedingly sultry; the our author's harem—if he had left it at the cathermometer in the cabin was at 86°; in the outer taract, - meaning,' says Mr. Legh, as I underair 96°, and in the sand 126° ; būt it was a great stood, to give me a female slave to wait upon my relief to find the inhabitants every where peaceably wife.' He afterwards made him a present of a disposed; they brought the travellers dates, milk, negro boy, and granted permission for them to and whatever their scanty means enabled them proceed to Ibrim, offering horses and dromedato afford. The temple of Sibhoi was minutely ries, or any thing else that could be of service.

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