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this sovereign of his own creation, his favourite fellow-soldier, connected with him by ties of kindred, should think it necessary for his own security to join the general confederacy against him. In the beginning of the year a treaty of alliance was concluded between the Emperor of Austria and the King of Naples, by the terms of which the Emperor engaged to keep at least 50,000 men in Italy, and the King 20,000, till the end of the war, to act in concert, and to be augmented in case of necessity; and the former guaranteed to the latter and his heirs the possession of the dominions actually held by him in Italy, and promised his mediation to induce the allies to accede to this guarantee. The King of Naples in consequence arrived at Bologna, whither Count

Bellegarde, on Jan. 6, went to pay his compliments to him. The French on the 4th quitted Verona, leaving a garrison in the old castle, and the Austrians on the same day entered the town. The Viceroy of Italy, Eugene Beauharnois, marched on the 7th with the flower of his troops on the side of Bozzolo on the Mincio, to oppose the passage of that river by the Austrians. A division and some battalions had already passed, when they were attacked by superior numbers. The whole of that day and the next passed in severe actions, in which the Austrians underwent considerable loss, but are represented as maintaining their ground. Their main army did not coine up till the 9th, when it was established to the number of between 40 and 50,000 men on both banks of the Mincio.

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army under Lord Wellington, which had taken up its winterquarters upon French territory. The first intelligence received from his Lordship was dated from St. Jean de Luz on January 9, at which period no other incident worthy of mention had taken place than the occupation of a height by the French to the right of a Portuguese brigade, from which they were afterwards driven without loss. In a dispatch dated Feb. 20, Lord Wellington mentions that on the 14th he moved the right of the army under Sir R. Hill, which attacked the enemy's position at Hellete, whence Gen. Harispe was obliged to retire with loss. Gen. Hill pursued on the next day, and found the French in a strong position in front of Garris, where Harispe had been joined by the division of Gen. Paris, which had been recalled from the march it had commenced towards the interior of France, as well as by other troops. A gallant attack was made upon this post by a Spanish and English division, under Gen. Murillo and Sir W. Stewart, who car.ried it without considerable loss. At the same time the centre of the army made a corresponding movement, and in successive actions drove their opponents across the Gave D'Oleron, upon which, on the 18th, its posts were established. The French at this time had considerably weakened their force at Bayonne, and had withdrawn from the right of the Adour above that town. The relics of the war in Germany consisted in the operations of the allied troops, which were employed in the investment and siege of those towns which were

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still occupied by Fren The untortunate city o was still suffering undlenting severity of M voust’s precautionaryn of which was the app a commission having condemning to deat who even used “ speeches to exasperat against their comm; inhabitants against ti ers, or against the tro zic was evacuated a cording to a capitula the French garrison soners of war. It the same day by D of Wurtemberg, 16,000 Russians amidst the general inhabitants delivere ferings of their lo fortress of Wittenb by storm on the ni 12, under the dio Tauenzien. After taken, the governo castle; but being der the threat of p rison to the sword, at discretion. The sailants was incons French prisoners we to Berlin. In Italy the conte Austrians and the maintained with con gour on both sides. legarde, the Austrian passing the Adige, add clamation to the peopl in which he mentioned

join the arms of the allies one of the most decisives of the opinion entertained poleon's approaching decli

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lifferent places, and FieldSir William Beresford atthe enemy's posts on the : Pau, and obliged them to The two above-mentioned nders then marched towards near which the French as assembled on the 25th, destroyed all the bridges on er. Several divisions of the led army marched up and | at different points, when emy was found in a strong on, with his right on the t on the road to Dax, and his n those above Orthes, and in town, opposing the passage or R. Hill. A general attack e enemy's centre and both is was then ordered, which seded in part after a vigorous ance; but the nature of the nd rendering the first plan of k impracticable in another t, the General ably altered it he midst of the action, and ating the enemy's fight posted he heights at the same time b r right and left, dislodged them secured the victory. The ich at first retired in admirable r, taking advantage of the y good positions which the try afforded. Being however y pushed, and losing many their retreat at length became it flight, and they were thrown he utmost confusion. The t continued till dusk, and uměd the next day, when ellington passed the Adour. dship does not pretend to he enem. o: "...i 'aoto onnon a o ld that

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CHAPTER II.

Napoleon's Attempt to recover Soissons.—His Attack upon Blucher at Craone.—The latter retreats to Laon and is there attacked.—French repulsed.—Rheims taken by the Russians and recovered by Napoleon.— Schwartzenberg's Army at Arcis-sur-Aube.--Arcis taken by the Prince of Wurtemberg.—Negociations at Chattillon broken off.-Lord Wellington advances to Orthes.—Carries the French Positions, and passes the Adour.—Citadel of Bayonne invested.—French retreat towards Tarbes.—Marshal Beresford enters Bourdeaur, where the White Cockade is hoisted, and the Duke of Angouleme is received.—French driven from Tarbes.—Aetions near Vitry.—Napoleon pushes between

the Allied Armies.—They unite and advance towards Paris.-French defeated at Fere Champenoise.—Convoy taken.—Advance of the Allies. —Marmont and Mortier enter Paris.-Force there.—Position of the Allies before the Capital.—Schwartzenberg's Address to the Parisians. —French march out.—Attacked at Belleville, &c. by the Allies.— Armistice and Capitulation of Paris.-Entrance of the Allied Sovereigns.—Their Declaration.—Decrees of the French Senate.—Transactions of Napoleon.—His Abdication.—Conditions.—State of the French Nation.— Provisional Government, and French Constitution. —Monsieur enters Paris. –Lord Wellington advances to Toulouse.— Battle there.—Suspension of Hostilities.—Sortie from Bayonne.— Transactions at Paris.—Decree of Monsieur.—Buonaparte's Departure from Fontainbleau.-Louis XVIII. lands in France.

WE left Napoleon making a second advance against the army commanded by Marshal Blucher, the antagonist whose spirit and enterprise appear to have rendered him peculiarly an object of alarm. This army effected its junction with the corps of Winzingerode and Bulow, at Soissons, on the evening of March 3; and the Field-marshal took a position to the left, and in the rear of Soissons, with his right on the village of Laffaux, and his left near Craone. On the 5th, Napoleon, with the whole of his guards, the corps of Marmont and Mortier, and a considerable body of cavalry, having

come up, determined on an attempt to recover Soissons, which was defended by 10,000 Russian infantry of Langeron's corps. The attack was made soon after day-light; the French gained possession of the greatest part of the suburbs, and twice assailed the town itself on opposite sides with heavy columns, supported by the divisions of Marmont and Mortier. They were both times repulsed, but still retained possession of the suburbs, whence they maintained a constant fire till night on the troops posted on the walls of the town, the Russians at the same time keeping another part of the suburbs,

and a few houses only separating the combatants. The contest was sanguinary, and the loss of the Russians is stated to have been more than a thousand in killed and wounded. Napoleon in the mean time was descried moving to his right; and on the forenoon of the 6th, he effccted his passage of the Aisne; and at two in the afternoon, commenced an attack on the left of Blucher's position at Craone. Strong columns were observed at the same time marching by Corbeny towards Laon. The Fieldmarshal made proper dispositions to secure Laon and cover the communication with that city, and at the same time to support that part of the position which was threatened. The enemy was repulsed, and the firing ceased with the day. On the morning of the 7th, it was ascertained that the French had desisted from their march to Laon, and their further intentions were not clearly discoverable. About eleven in the forenoon, however, they began an attack with their whole force against the point where Winzingerode's infantry was posted. A very severe action ensued, the result of which was, that Gen. Sacken found it necessary to execute that part of the disposition which provided for the retreat of the army towards Laon. This was effected with great order, not even a single dismounted gun being left in the enemy's possession. The lossin killed and wounded was, however, considerable; and that of the Freuch could scarcely be inferior, from the admirable manner in which the Russian artillery was served. On March 9, Napoleon with his concentrated force attacked Blucher in his position at Laon, where the

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with columns of infantry and cavalry on the causeway towards Soissons. They were soon repulsed from the nearest villages, and Blucher ordered the cavalry from the rear to advance and turn their left flank, whilst a part of Bulow's corps was ordered to drive them from the other village. During these operations, about two in the afternoon, a column of the enemy, consisting of sixteen battalions of infantry, with cavalry and cannon, was descried advancing along the causeway from Rheims. General D’Yorck, with Sacken to support him, were directed to oppose them, and here the battle became most general and decisive. The French opened a battery of forty or fifty pieces of artillery, and were con

fidently moving forward on a pas de charge, when they were met by Prince William of Prussia, and overthrown. Their retreat soon became a flight, in which they lost baggage, cannon, and prisoners. The pursuit continued as far as Corbeny. On the right, no other advantages were gained than the expulsion of the French from the villages. The attack on the right was renewed on the next day, the 10th, and continued during the whole of it. The French at one

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