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THE FACTORS

OF THE

UNSOUND MIND

WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE

PLEA OF INSANITY IN CRIMINAL CASES

AND THE

AMENDMENT OF THE LAW.

BY

WILLIAM A.^£U Y,

M.B. Cantab., F.R.C.P., F.R.S.

Consulting Physician to King's College Hospital; late President of the
Statistical Society; Honorary Member of the Medico-Psychological
Association; and formerly Professor of Forensic Medicine
and Hygiene in King's College^ London,
Author of "Principles of Forensic Medicine " and of "Public Health;"
also Editor of "Hooper's Physician's Vade Mecum," and of
Walker's "Original;" etc., etc.

"Though this be madness, yet there's method in it."

LONDON:
THOS. DE LA RUE & CO.

1881

[TAc Right of Translation and Reproduction is reserved.]

"But if there be any doubt of sanity, surely the evidence of men of acknowledged science and reputation should at least be listened to, especially in capital offences, lest the execution of the maniac be a miserable spectacle both against law and of extreme inhumanity and cruelty, and be no example to others."—COKE in "Blackstone," as cited by Johnstone.

"// cannot be necessary to enter upon any serious refutation of that senseless and inhuman cackle and gabble of sophistry, that madmen who commit great crimes should not be merely shut out of society, but, like all other rabid animals, should be hunted out of life?—" On Madness."— Johnstone's Medical Essays.

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