The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: Troilus and Cressida. Cymbeline. King Lear. Romeo and Juliet

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Collins & Hannay, 1823
 

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Del 25
308
Del 26
310
Del 27
313
Del 28
360

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Side 172 - FEAR no more the heat o' the sun, Nor the furious winter's rages: Thou thy worldly task hast done, Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages: Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust. Fear no more the frown o' the great: Thou art past the tyrant's stroke.
Side 326 - O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you. She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate-stone On the fore-finger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep ; Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners...
Side 334 - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! — Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
Side 21 - The heavens themselves, the planets and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order : And therefore is the glorious planet, Sol, In noble eminence enthron'd and spher'd Amidst the other ; whose med'cinable eye Corrects the ill aspects of planets evil, And posts, like the commandment of a king, Sans check, to good and bad...
Side 252 - O, reason not the need : our basest beggars Are in the poorest thing superfluous: Allow not nature more than nature needs, Man's life is cheap as beast's: thou art a lady; If only to go warm were gorgeous, Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear'st, Which scarcely keeps thee warm. — But, for true need, — You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need ! You see me here, you gods, a poor old man, As full of grief as age ; wretched in both ! If it be you that stir these daughters...
Side 170 - With fairest flowers, Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave : thou shalt not lack The flower that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azur'd harebell, like thy veins ; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Side 282 - Come on, sir; here's the place: stand still. How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs that wing the midway air Show scarce so gross as beetles: halfway down Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yond...
Side 212 - For, by the sacred radiance of the sun ; The mysteries of Hecate, and the night ; By all the operations of the orbs, From whom we do exist, and cease to be ; Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity, and property of blood, And as a stranger to my heart and me Hold thee, from this, for ever.
Side 253 - ... hearts Against their father, fool me not so much To bear it tamely : touch me with noble anger ! And let not women's weapons, water-drops, Stain my man's cheeks !— No, you unnatural hags, I will have such revenges on you both, That all the world shall — I will do such things — What they are yet I know not ; but they shall be The terrors of the earth. You think I'll weep ; No, I'll not weep : — • I have full cause of weeping ; but this heart Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws,...
Side 337 - And yet I wish but for the thing I have: My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep ; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.

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