Selections from the British Satirists: With an Introductory Essay by Cecil Headlam

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F. E. Robinson, 1897 - 329 sider
 

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Side 282 - Here lies our good Edmund, whose genius was such, We scarcely can praise it or blame it too much ; Who, born for the universe, narrowed his mind, And to party gave up what was meant for mankind...
Side 252 - is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge.
Side 281 - Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head. Beside yon straggling fence that skirts the way, With blossom'd furze unprofitably gay, There, in his noisy mansion, skill'd to rule, The village master taught his little school ; A man severe he was, and stern to view, I knew him well, and every truant knew...
Side 252 - I had exhausted all the art of pleasing which a retired and uncourtly scholar can possess. I had done all that I could ; and no man is well pleased to have his all neglected, be it ever so little.
Side 194 - He sought the storms ; but, for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands to boast his wit. Great wits are sure to madness near allied, And thin partitions do their bounds divide ; Else why should he, with wealth and honour blest, Refuse his age the needful hours of rest?
Side 174 - Twas Presbyterian true blue, For he was of that stubborn crew Of Errant Saints, whom all men grant To be the true Church Militant...
Side 283 - Though secure of our hearts, yet confoundedly sick If they were not his own by finessing and trick: He cast off his friends as a huntsman his pack, For he knew, when he pleased, he could whistle them back.
Side 175 - The wrong, than others the right way; Compound for sins they are inclined to By damning those they have no mind to.
Side 236 - He is taller, by almost the breadth of my nail, than any of his court, 'which alone is enough to strike an awe into the beholders. His features are strong and masculine, with an Austrian lip and arched nose ; his complexion olive, his countenance erect, his body and limbs well proportioned, all his motions graceful, and his deportment majestic. He...
Side 283 - As an actor, confess'd without rival to shine ; As a wit, if not first, in the very first line : Yet, with talents like these, and an excellent heart, The man had his failings, a dupe to his art. Like an ill-judging beauty, his colours he spread, And beplaster'd with rouge his own natural red. On the stage he was natural, simple, affecting ; 'Twas only that when he was off he was acting.

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