The Wonders of Geology: Or, A Familiar Exposition of Geological Phenomena : Being the Substance of a Course of Lectures Delivered at Brighton, Volum 1

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Side 6 - To conclude therefore, let no man, upon a weak conceit of sobriety or an ill-applied moderation, think or maintain that a man can search too far or be too well studied in the book of God's word or in the book of God's works ; divinity or philosophy ; but rather let men endeavour an endless progress or proficience in both...
Side 183 - My heart is awed within me when I think Of the great miracle that still goes on, In silence, round me, — the perpetual work Of thy creation, finished, yet renewed Forever.
Side 53 - Far down, and shining through their stillness lies ! Thou hast the starry gems, the burning gold, Won from ten thousand royal argosies. Sweep o'er thy spoils, thou wild and wrathful main ! Earth claims not these again.
Side 267 - The castled crag of Drachenfels Frowns o'er the wide and winding Rhine, Whose breast of waters broadly swells Between the banks which bear the vine...
Side 53 - Yet more, the Depths have more ! — What wealth untold Far down, and shining through their stillness lies ! Thou hast the starry gems, the burning gold, Won from ten thousand royal Argosies.
Side 79 - Nothing can be more melancholy," says Denon, "than to walk over villages swallowed up by the sand of the Desert, to trample under foot their roofs...
Side 419 - Cornwall is covered with a calcareous sand, consisting of minute particles of comminuted shells, which, in some places, has accumulated in quantities so great, as to have formed hills of from forty to sixty feet in elevation. In digging into these...
Side 99 - On Lough Neagh's bank, as the fisherman strays, When the clear cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days In the wave beneath him shining...
Side 33 - ... the earth. The fall of meteoric stones is much more frequent than is generally believed; hardly a year passes without some instances occurring, and if it be considered...
Side 258 - It is true that the cones thrown up around are partially wooded and in general covered with herbage ; but the sides of some are still naked ; and the interior of their broken craters rugged, black, and scorified, as well as the rocky floods of lava with which they have loaded the plain, have a freshness of aspect such as the products of fire alone could have preserved so long, and offer a striking picture of the operations of this element in all its most terrible energy.

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