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Rock-Landing on the said river Oconee, and thence proceed to ascertain the said head or source cf the main south branch of the said river, at the place where- it, shall be intersected by the line aforesaid, to be drawn from the Currahee mountain. And in order that the said boundary shall be rendered distinct and well known, it shall be marked by aline of felled trees at least twenty feet wide, and the trees chopped on each side from the said Currahee mountain, to the head or source of the said main south branch of the Oco:iee river, and thence down the marginof the said main south branch and river Oconee for the distance of twenty miles, or as much farther as may be necessary to mark distinctly the ■said boundary. And in order to extinguish forever all claims of the Creek nation, or any part thereof, to any of the land lying; to the northward and eastward of the boundary herein described, it is hereby agreed, in addition to the considerations heretofore made for the said land, that the United States will cause certain valuable Indian goods now in the state of Georgia, to he delivered to the said Creek nation ; and the said Un'ued States will also cause the sum of one thousand and live hundred dollars to be paid annually to the said Creek nation. And the kings, chit& and warriors, do hereby for themselves and the whole Creek nation, their heirs and descendants, for the considerations abovementioned,release, quit claim, relinquish a::d cede, all the land to the northward and eastward of the boundary herein describtd.

ARTICLE V.

The United Statesisolcmnly guarantee to the Creek nation, all their lands within the limits of the United States to the westward and southward of the boundary described in the preceding article. ARTICLE VI.

If any citizen of the United States, or other person not being an Indian, shall attempt to settle on any of the Creeks lands, surh person shall forfeit the protection of the United States, and the Creeks may punish him or nut, as they please.

ARTICLE VII,

No citizen or inhabitant of the United States shall attempt to hun! or destroy the game on the Creek lands: Nor shall any such citizen or inhabitant go into the Creek country, without a passport first obtained from the governor of some one of the United States, or the officer of the troops of the United States commanding at the nearest military post on the frontiers, or such other person as the president of the United Stales may, from time to time, authorize to grantthe same. ARTICLE VIII.

If any Creek Indian or Indians, or person residing among them, of who shall take refuge in their nation, shall commit a robbery or murder, or othercapital crime, on any of the citizens or inhabitants of the United States, the Creek nation, or town, or tribe to whichsuch offender or offenders may belong, shall be bound to deliver him or thera up, to be punished according to the laws of the United States.

ARTICLE IX.

If any citizen or inhabitant of the United States, or of either of the territorial districts of the United States, shall go into any town, settlement or territory belonging to the Creek nation of Indians, and snail ♦here commit any crime upon,o:- trespass against tiie person or piepcrly of any peaceable and friendly Indian or Indians, which if committed within the jurisdiction of any state, or within the jurisdiction of cither of the said districts, against a citizen or white inhabitant thereof, would be punishable by the laws of such i-tale or district, such offender or offenders shall be subject to the same punishment, and shall be proceeded against in the same manner, as if the offence had been committed within the jurisdiction of the state or district to which h« or they may belong, against a citizen or vhite inhabitant thereof.

ARTICLE X.

In cases of violence on the persons or property of the individuals of either party, neither retaliation nor reprisal shall be committed by the other, until satisfaction shall have been demanded of the party, of which the aggressor is, and shall have been refused. ARTICLE XI.

The Creeks shall give notice to the citizens of the United States of any designs, which they may know or suspect to be formed in any neighboring tribe, or by any person whatever, against the peace and inteiestsof the United States.

ARTICLE XII.

That the Creek nation may be led to a greater degree of civilization, and to become herdsmen and cultivators, instead of remaining in a state of hunters, the United States will from time to time furnish gratuitously the said nation with useful domestic animals and implements of husbandry. And further to assist the said nation in so desirable a pursuit, and at the same time to establish a certain mode of communication, the United States will send such, and so'many persons to resid* in said nation as they may judge prop.-r, and not exceeding four in number, who shall qualify themselves to act as interpreters. These persons shall have lands assigned them by the Creeks for cultivation, for themselves and their successors in office; but they shall be precluded exercising any kind of traffic.

ARTICLE XIII.

All animosities for past grievances shall henceforth cease ; and the contracting parties will carry the foregoing treaty into full execution,1 with all good faith and sincerity.

ARTICLE XIV.

This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall have been ratified by the president of the United States, with the advice and consent of the Senate of theUnited States.

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Made and concluded at Colerain, the twenty-ninth day of June, in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six, between the President of the United States if America, on tlie one part, and the Kings, Chiefs and Warriors of the Creek Nation of Indians, on the other part-,

I^HE parties being desirous of establishing permanent peace and . friends-hip between the United States and the said Creek nation, and the citizens and members thereof; and to remove the ca,usen of TVr>r. by -sc-r'.air.in;< their limits, ant] making other necessary, put and frien-'l;- a ia . ;-.*:nents ; the president of t;ie United States,by Benjamin Harvl-ins, Ccorgc Clymcr and Andrew Picker.;,, commissioners vbom he hath consti nUd with powers for these purposes, by and with the advice and efui-eM of the Ncin-te; and the Creek nation of Indians, by the ki.igs, c'u-.fs and warriors, representing the whole Creek uation.have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

The tre ;!y cr.tercd into, at New-York, 'between the parties onth* 7th day < f August, I't'.'d, v.,. and shall remain obligatory on the contrditi:i!-'XLi-Lics,-( cording to the terms of it, except as herein provided for

ARTICLE III

The boundary line from the Currahee mountain') to the head, or source of the main small branch of tiie Oconee river, called by the whiu people, Appal: tehee, and by the. Indians, 'J'ulapocka, and down the middle of the same, shall he clearly ascertained, and marked, at such time, and in such manlier, as the; president shall direct. And the Intiians will, on being informed of the determination of the president' send as many of ihci.oid chiefs, as he may reouire, to see the line ascertained and marked.

ARTICLE III.

The president of the United States of America shall have full powers, whenever lie may deem it advisable, to establish a trading or military post on the soutn side of the Alatamaha, on the bluff, about one miH above lieurd's bluff; or any where from thence down the said river on the lands of the Indians, to garrison the same with any part of the military force of the United States, to protect the posts, and to prevent the violation of any of the provisions or regulations subsisting between the parlies : And the Indians do hereby atuiex to the post aforesaid,atraei of land of five miles square, bordering one side on the river ; which post and the lands annexed thereto, are hereby ceded to, and shall be to the use, and under the government of the United States of America.

ARTICLE IV.

As soon as the president of the United States has determined on the1 time and manner of running the line from the Currahee mountain, to the head or source of the main south branch of the Oconee, and notified the chiefs of the Creek land of the same, a suitable number of pei-snns on their part shall attend to see the same completed: And if the president should deem it proper, then to fix on "any place or places adjoining the river, and on the Indian hinds for military or trading posts; the Creeks who attend there, will concur in fixing the same, according to the wishes of the president. And'to each post, the Indians shall unisex a tract of land of five miles square, bordering one side on the river. And the said l.uids shall he to the use and under the government of the United States of America. Provided always, that whenever any of the trailing or military posts mentioned in this treaty, shall, in the opinion of the president of the United States of America, be no longer necessary for the purposes intended by this cession, the same shall reTFerl to, and become ii part of the Indian lauds.

Articjue \ .

Whenever the president of the U-.ted, SUI&s of America, and the king of Spain, may deem it advisable to mark the boundaries which separate their territories, the president shall give notice thereof to the Creekchiefs, who will furnish two principal chiefs, and twenty hunters to accompany the persons employed on this business, as hunters and guides from the Choctaw country, to the head of St. Mary's. The chiefs shall receive each half a dollar per day, and the hunters one quarter of a dollar each per day, and ammunition, and a reasonable value for the meat delivered by them for the use of the persons on this service. ARTICLE VI.

The treaties of Hopewell, between the United States and the Chofclawa and Chickasaws, and at Holston between the Cherokees and the United States, mark the boundaries of those tribes of Indians. And the Creek nation do hereby relinquish all claims to any part of the territory inhabited or claimed by the citizens of the United States, in conformity With the said treaties.

ARTICLE VII.

The Creek nation shall deliver, as soon as practicable, to the super* intendant of Indian affairs, at such place as he may direct, all citizens of the United States, white inhabitants and negroes, who are now prisoners in any part of the said nation, agreeable to the treaty at NewYork, and also all citizens) white inhabitants, negroes and property taken since the signing of that treaty. And if any such prisoners, negroes or property should not be delivered, on or before the first day of January next, the governor of Georgia may empower three persons to repair to the said nation, in order to claim and receive such prisoners, negroes and property, under the direction of the president of the United States. ARTICLE VIII.

In consideration of the friendly disposition of the Creek nation towards the government of the United States, evidenced by the stipulations in the present treaty, and particularly the leaving it in the discretion of the president to establish trading or military posts on their lands ; the commissioners of the United States on behalf of the said states, give to the said nation, goods to the value of six thousand dollars, and stipulate to send to the Indian nation, two blacksmiths, with strikers, to be employed for the upper and lower Creeks with the necessary tools. ARTICLE IX.

All animosities for past grievances shall henceforth cease; and the contracting parties will carry the foregoing treaty into full execution, with all good faith and sincerity. Provided nevertheless, That persons now under arrest, in the state of Georgia, for a violation of the treaty at NewYork, are not to be included in this amnesty, but are to abide the decision of law. ARTICLE X.

This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall have been ratified by the president of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

Note. This treaty -iiv/j ratified by the president and senate on condition, That nothing ins The 3d C^ At h articles should be construed to affetl any claim of th; state of Georgia to the right of pre-emption in the land therein set apart for military or trading posts or to give to the U. States Ksjithout the consent of the said state, any right to the soil, or to the exclusive legislation over the same, or any other right than that of establishing, maintaining, and exclusively governing military *rtd trading posts ivithin the Indian territory mentioned In the sold articles, as long as the frontier "f Georgia may require these esttilishmenls, Q,

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Between Timothy Tickcring, agent for the United States, and the Chirfi of the Oneida, Tuscorora, arid Stockbridge Indians, d-velling in the lounfrj of the VneiJas, concluded at Oneida the second day of December, in the jear one thousand seven hundred end ninety-four.

WHEREAS, in the. late war between Oeat-Britain and the United States of America, a body of the Oneida and Tuscorora and the Stockbridge Indians adhered faithfully to the United States, and assisted them 'with their warriors ; and in consequence of this adherence and assistance, the Oneidasand Tuscororas, at an unfortunate period of the War, were driven from their homes, and their houses were burnt and their property destroyed: And as the United States in the time of their distress, acknowledged their obligations to these faithful iriends, and promised to reward them: And the United States being How in a condition to fulfil the promises then made, the following article! are stipulated by the respective parties for that purpose; to be in force when ratified by the President ;md Senate.

ARTICLE L The United States will pay the sum of five thousand dollars, to be distributed among individuals of the Oneida and Tuscorora nations, as « compensation for their individual losses and services during the late War between Great-Britain and the United States. The only man of the Kaughnawaugus now remaining in the Oneida country, as well as some fjvv very meritorious persons of the Stockbridge Indians, will be considered in the distribution.

ARTICLE II. I or the general accommodation of these Indian nations, residing in. the country of the Oneidas, the United States will cause to be erected a complete grist-mill and saw-mill, in a situation to serve the present principal settlements of these nations. Or if such one convenient situation cannot be found, then the United States will cause to be erected two slich grist-mills and saw-milis, in places where it is nov known the proposed accommodation may be effected. Of this the United States will judge.

ARTICLE III. The United States will provide, during three years after the mill' shall be completed, for the expense of employing one or two suitable persons to manage the mills, to keep them in repair, to instruct some young men of the three nations in the arts of the miller and sawcr, aiid to provide teams and utensils for carrying on the work of the mills.

ARTICLE IV* The United States will pay one thousand dollars, to be applied in building a convenient church at Oneida, in the place of the one which was there burnt by the eneinv, in the late war.

ARTICLE V*

In consideration of the above stipulations to be performed on the part

of the United States, tnc Oneida, Tuscorora and Stockbridge Indians

uforfciiitnuoiied, now uiknow ledge themselves satisfied,and rclinquishall

other claims of compensation and rewards for their losses anil services

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