The works of William Cowper, with a life of the author, by the editor R. Southey

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Robert Southey
1843
 

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Side xxxvi - Oh how unlike the complex works of man, Heaven's easy, artless, unencumbered plan ! No meretricious graces to beguile, No clustering ornaments to clog the pile ; From ostentation, as from weakness, free, It stands like the cerulean arch we see, Majestic in its own simplicity. Inscribed above the portal, from afar Conspicuous as the brightness of a star, Legible only by the light they give, Stand the soul-quickening words — BELIEVE, AND LIVE.
Side xxx - ... and imperfections of manners. For if a man's mind be deeply seasoned with the consideration of the mortality and corruptible nature of things, he will easily concur with Epictetus, who went forth one day...
Side xxxvii - Leaves have their time to fall, And flowers to wither at the north wind's breath, And stars to set, but all — Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death...
Side lxxxv - I will conclude with that which hath rationem totius, which is, that it disposeth the constitution of the mind not to be fixed or settled in the defects thereof, but still to be capable and susceptible of growth and reformation.
Side xcvii - Be to their faults a little blind And to their virtues very kind.
Side lxxxv - It were too long to go over the particular remedies which learning doth minister to all the diseases of the mind, sometimes purging the ill humours, sometimes opening the obstructions, sometimes helping digestion, sometimes increasing appetite, sometimes healing the wounds and exulcerations thereof, and the like ; and therefore I will conclude with that which hath rationem totius...
Side xxxvii - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Side lxxxv - The good parts he hath he will learn to show to the full, and use them dexterously, but not much to increase them : the faults he hath he will learn how to hide and colour them, but not much to amend them : like an ill mower, that mows on still, and never whets his scythe : whereas with the learned man it fares otherwise, that he doth ever intermix the correction and amendment of his mind with the use and employment thereof.
Side xxix - Such notes as, warbled to the string, Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what love did...
Side xxxii - Nay further, in general and in sum, certain it is that veritas and bonitas differ but as the seal and the print ; for truth prints goodness, and they be the clouds of error which descend in the storms of passions and perturbations.

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