The pilgrim's progress, from this world to that which is to come. With explanatory notes by [W.] Mason

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Side 11 - The PILGRIM'S PROGRESS IN THE SIMILITUDE OF A DREAM As I WALKED through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a Den, and I laid me down in that place to sleep: and as I slept I dreamed a dream. I dreamed, and behold, I saw a man clothed with rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back.
Side 90 - Give me understanding, and I shall keep thy law; yea, I shall observe it with my whole heart.
Side 257 - For why ? the Lord our God is good, His mercy is for ever sure ; His truth at all times firmly stood, And shall from age to age endure.
Side 287 - There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty.
Side 105 - May I speak a few words in my own defence ? JUDGE. Sirrah, sirrah, thou deservest to live no longer, but to be slain immediately upon the place : yet, that all men may see our gentleness towards thee, let us hear what thou hast to say.
Side 14 - He said, I think I do. Then said Evangelist, Keep that light in your eye, and go up directly thereto: so shalt thou see the gate; at which, when thou knockest, it shall be told thee what thou shalt do.
Side 67 - But now, in this Valley of Humiliation, poor Christian was hard put to it ; for he had gone but a little way before he espied a foul fiend coming over the field to meet him ; his name is Apollyon. Then did Christian begin to be afraid, and to cast in his mind whether to go back or to stand his ground.
Side 173 - Now I saw in my dream that these two men went in at the gate: and lo, as they entered, they were transfigured, and they had raiment put on that shone like gold. There...
Side 146 - The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold, the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon. He esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood. The arrow cannot make him flee, sling-stones are turned with him into stubble. Darts are counted as stubble : he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.
Side 169 - Beulah, whose air was very sweet and pleasant, the way lying directly through it, they solaced themselves there for a season ; yea, here they heard continually the singing of birds, and saw every day the flowers appear in the earth, and heard the voice of the turtle in the land.

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